How Slade Brockman voted compared to someone who believes that Members of Parliament (MPs) and Senators should vote to suspend standing and sessional orders (that is, the procedural rules of Parliament) so that their colleagues can introduce motions for Parliament to vote on even when the the procedural rules would prevent them from doing so

Division Slade Brockman Supporters vote Division outcome

2nd Dec 2019, 11:12 AM – Senate Motions - Climate Change - Suspend the usual rules

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The majority voted against a motion to suspend the usual parliamentary rules so that a vote can happen. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to suspend standing orders.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent Senator Wong moving a motion relating to the conduct of the business of the Senate, namely a motion to provide that general business notice of motion No. 314 be called on immediately and be considered until 12.20 pm.

No Yes (strong) Not passed by a small majority

2nd Apr 2019, 5:29 PM – Senate Motions - Climate Change - Let a vote happen

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Victorian Senator Janet Rice (Greens) to suspend the usual procedural rules to let a vote happen. In parliamentary jargon, they voted against suspending standing orders.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent Senator Rice from moving a motion to provide for consideration of that motion.

No Yes (strong) Not passed by a modest majority

14th Feb 2019, 12:44 PM – Senate Motions - Queensland Nickel - Suspend usual rules

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The majority voted against a motion to suspend the usual procedural rules (known as standing orders) so that Queensland Senator Pauline Hanson (One Nation) can introduce her motion on Queensland Nickel, which means Senator Hanson won't be able to do so.

In parliamentary jargon, they voted against the following motion:

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the motion being moved immediately and determined without amendment or debate.

No Yes (strong) Not passed by a modest majority

6th Dec 2018, 2:32 PM – Senate Home Affairs Legislation Amendment (Miscellaneous Measures) Bill 2018 - Second Reading - Let a vote happen

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The majority voted against a motion to ignore the usual procedural rules so that Senator Cory Bernardi (SA) can move an amendment. In parliamentary jargon, the motion was:

That so much of standing orders be suspended as would prevent me from moving my foreshadowed second reading amendment.

Yes Yes (strong) Not passed by a small majority

4th Dec 2018, 5:05 PM – Senate Documents - Queensland: Abortion - Let a vote happen

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The majority voted against a motion to suspend the usual laws (known as standing orders) to let a vote happen, which means the vote won't happen.

Because the vote related to abortion, which is considered a matter of conscience, the Liberal Party held a free vote, which is when its members can vote either way depending on their own conscience.

absent Yes (strong) Not passed by a modest majority

26th Nov 2018, 4:23 PM – Senate Motions - Suspension of Standing Orders - Let a vote happen

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The majority voted against a motion to suspend the usual rules, which means it failed. In parliamentary jargon, they voted against suspending standing orders. It was introduced by South Australian Senator Cory Bernardi (Australian Conservatives).

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent me moving a motion that general business notice of motion No. 1212 may be moved immediately and determined without amendment or debate.

No Yes (strong) Not passed by a large majority

17th Oct 2018, 4:23 PM – Senate Motions - Suspension of Standing Orders - Let a vote happen

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The majority voted against letting Senator Fraser Anning introduce a motion about Jerusalem being Israel's capital.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent me from moving a motion that general business notice of motion no. 1141 may be moved immediately and determined without amendment or debate.

No Yes (strong) Not passed by a large majority

15th Oct 2018, 3:22 PM – Senate Documents - Religious Freedom Review Expert Panel; Order for the Production of Documents - Let a vote happen

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The majority voted against a motion to suspend the usual rules to allow a vote to happen. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to suspend the standing orders.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended, as would prevent me from moving a motion relating to consideration of a matter, namely a motion relating to an order for the production of a document.

No Yes (strong) Not passed by a modest majority

15th Oct 2018, 11:11 AM – Senate Motions — Suspension of Standing Orders

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The majority voted against a motion to suspend the usual rules to allow a vote to happen.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent Senator Hinch from moving a motion relating to the consideration of a matter, namely a motion relating to discrimination by independent schools.

No Yes (strong) Not passed by a small majority

20th Aug 2018, 4:20 PM – Senate Motions - Suspension of Standing Orders

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The majority voted against a motion to suspend the usual rules so that a vote can happen. In parliamentary jargon:

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the motion being moved immediately and determined without amendment or debate.

Yes Yes (strong) Not passed by a small majority

15th Aug 2018, 10:48 AM – Senate Motions - Anning, Senator Fraser; Censure - Let vote happen

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The majority voted against a motion to suspend the usual rules to allow a vote to happen. In the usual parliamentary language, the motion was:

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the Leader of the Australian Greens moving a motion to provide for the consideration of a matter; namely, a motion to give precedence to a motion relating to the censure of Senator Anning.

No Yes (strong) Not passed by a modest majority

25th Jun 2018, 4:53 PM – Senate Motions - Suspension of Standing Orders - Let Senator McKim introduce his motion

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The majority voted against suspending the usual procedural rules (known as standing orders) so that Greens Senator Nick McKim can introduce a motion.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent Senator McKim moving a motion relating to the conduct of the business of the Senate, namely a motion to give precedence to general business notice of motion No. 878 which relates to the policy of US President Trump to forcibly separate families of people seeking asylum in the US.

absent Yes (strong) Not passed by a modest majority

30th Nov 2017, 1:20 PM – Senate Motions - Dastyari, Senator Sam - Suspend standing order

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The majority agreed to a motion to suspend the usual parliamentary rules (known as standing orders) so that a vote can take place. Since this vote was successful, Senator George Brandis' motion could be voted on.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent Senator Brandis moving a motion to provide for the consideration of a matter, namely a motion to provide that a motion relating to Senator Dastyari may be moved immediately and determined without amendment or debate.

Yes Yes (strong) Passed by a modest majority

17th Oct 2017, 1:05 PM – Senate Motions - Suspension of Standing Orders - Let a vote happen

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The majority voted against a motion to suspend the rules to allow a vote to happen. In parliamentary jargon, they voted against suspending the standing orders.

Greens Senator Richard Di Natale had introduced this motion so that he could move "a motion to give precedence to a motion relating to climate change".

No Yes (strong) Not passed by a large majority

17th Aug 2017, 1:50 PM – Senate Documents - Deputy Prime Minister - Let a vote happen

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The majority voted against a motion to let a vote happen. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to suspend the standing orders. This means that the vote won't happen.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent Senator McKim moving a motion relating to the Government's failure to provide a response to an order for production of documents concerning the Member for New England.

No Yes (strong) Not passed by a modest majority

16th Aug 2017, 10:09 AM – Senate Motions - Wong, Senator Penny; Censure - Let a vote happen

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The majority voted against a motion to let a vote on Labor Senator Penny Wong to happen, which means the following motion won't take place.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent me moving a motion to provide for the consideration of a matter, namely a motion to give precedence to a motion to censure the Shadow Minister for Foreign Affairs, Senator Wong, in the following terms:

That the Senate censures the Shadow Minister for Foreign Affairs (Senator Wong) for:

(a) causing her Chief of Staff to engage in inappropriate conduct with a foreign political entity for the purpose of causing damage to Australia;

(b) causing her Chief of Staff to interfere in the political process of New Zealand for the purpose of undermining the Australian Government;

(c) misleading the Senate by suggesting that the issue of the Deputy Prime Minister's citizenship arose in New Zealand as a result of media inquiries, rather than orchestration by her Chief of Staff;

(d) embarrassing the government of New Zealand, and thereby potentially causing damage to Australia's relationship with one of our closest allies; and

(e) engaging in conduct which makes her unfit to ever hold the office of Foreign Minister of Australia.

absent Yes (strong) Not passed by a small majority

How "voted moderately against" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 3 150 150
MP voted against policy 10 0 500
MP absent 3 75 150
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 0 0 0
Total: 225 800

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 225 / 800 = 28%.

And then