How Jan McLucas voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should introduce the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme, which is a cap-and-trade system of emissions trading introduced by the Rudd Labor Government

Division Jan McLucas Supporters vote Division outcome

22nd Feb 2010, 5:56 PM – Senate Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2010 and related bills - First Reading - Proceed without formalities

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The motion that "the bills may proceed without formalities" failed to gain a majority. An equal number of MPs voted 'aye' and 'no', which means that the motion failed.

This motion is a procedural motion and, according to Odgers' Australian Senate Practice, "has the effect of suspending the requirements, otherwise imposed by the standing orders, for stages of the passage of the bill or bills to take place on different days, for notice of motions for such stages, and for the printing and certification of the bill or bills during passage".(Read the relevant part of Odgers' Australian Senate Practice here. ) Because this motion failed, the bill will have go through the usual delays provided by the standing orders.

Background to the bills

The Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2010 and ten related bills were introduced to create the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme. This is the third attempt to introduce this scheme.(Read about the previous attempts here. )

The scheme is an emission trading scheme designed to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in an effort to address climate change. It gives effect to Australia's obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol.

The design of the scheme has been criticised by the business community for threatening jobs and by environmentalists for not going far enough with its emission reduction targets.(Read more about these criticisms here.)

The ten other bills are called:

References

Yes Yes Not passed

30th Nov 2009, 9:53 PM – Senate Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 [No. 2] and related bills - In Committee - Free permits for coal fired electricity generators

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The majority voted against amendments introduced by Greens Senator Christine Milne.

Senator Milne explains that these amendments address the issue of giving free permits to coal fired electricity generators. She says that "there is no public policy purpose for these free permits going to coal fired power stations".(Read the whole explanation of these amendment here, starting from 8:45pm. )

Background to the bills

The Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 (No. 2) was introduced as part of a package of six bills along with five other related bills to introduce the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme. They reflect the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 and its related acts, as amended in the House of Representatives before it was negated in the Senate.(See that division here. )

The scheme is an emission trading scheme designed to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in an effort to address climate change. It gives effect to Australia's obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol.

The design of the scheme has been criticised by the business community for threatening jobs and by environmentalists for not going far enough with its emission reduction targets.(Read more about these criticisms here.)

The six bills that were introduced as a package are called:

The five other related bills are called:

References

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

30th Nov 2009, 8:05 PM – Senate Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 [No. 2] and related bills - In Committee - Limit overseas permits

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The majority voted against amendments introduced by Greens Senator Christine Milne.

Senator Milne explained that "these amendments go to whether or not there should be a restriction on the number of overseas payments that can be bought and used in Australia. The government’s scheme as it stands allows for the unlimited purchase of overseas permits, and we seek to amend this to restrict the purchase of overseas permits to 20 per cent."(Read the whole explanation of these amendment here, starting from 7:30pm. )

Background to the bills

The Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 (No. 2) was introduced as part of a package of six bills along with five other related bills to introduce the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme. They reflect the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 and its related acts, as amended in the House of Representatives before it was negated in the Senate.(See that division here. )

The scheme is an emission trading scheme designed to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in an effort to address climate change. It gives effect to Australia's obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol.

The design of the scheme has been criticised by the business community for threatening jobs and by environmentalists for not going far enough with its emission reduction targets.(Read more about these criticisms here.)

The six bills that were introduced as a package are called:

The five other related bills are called:

References

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

30th Nov 2009, 6:27 PM – Senate Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 [No. 2] and related bills - In Committee - Free allocation of permits

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The majority voted against a series of amendments introduced by Greens Senator Christine Milne.

Senator Milne explains that "[t]he purpose of this particular set of amendments goes to the question of how permits under the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme are allocated. The Australian Greens believe that there is no case whatsoever for allocating free permits. We believe that there should be 100 per cent auctioning of these permits."(Read the whole explanation of these amendment here, starting from 4:15pm. )

Background to the bills

The Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 (No. 2) was introduced as part of a package of six bills along with five other related bills to introduce the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme. They reflect the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 and its related acts, as amended in the House of Representatives before it was negated in the Senate.(See that division here. )

The scheme is an emission trading scheme designed to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in an effort to address climate change. It gives effect to Australia's obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol.

The design of the scheme has been criticised by the business community for threatening jobs and by environmentalists for not going far enough with its emission reduction targets.(Read more about these criticisms here.)

The six bills that were introduced as a package are called:

The five other related bills are called:

References

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

30th Nov 2009, 12:23 PM – Senate Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 [No. 2] and related bills - In Committee - Insert mandatory requirement to consider

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The majority voted against amendments introduced by Greens Senator Christine Milne.

Senator Milne explains that these amendments insert "a mandatory requirement to take into account optimal atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases ... So the minister must have regard to that principle that 350 parts per million CO2e is in Australia’s interests."(Read the whole explanation of these amendment here, starting from 10:56am. )

Background to the bills

The Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 (No. 2) was introduced as part of a package of six bills along with five other related bills to introduce the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme. They reflect the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 and its related acts, as amended in the House of Representatives before it was negated in the Senate.(See that division here. )

The scheme is an emission trading scheme designed to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in an effort to address climate change. It gives effect to Australia's obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol.

The design of the scheme has been criticised by the business community for threatening jobs and by environmentalists for not going far enough with its emission reduction targets.(Read more about these criticisms here.)

The six bills that were introduced as a package are called:

The five other related bills are called:

References

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

30th Nov 2009, 12:00 PM – Senate Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme (CPRS Fuel Credits) Bill 2009 [No. 2] and Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Amendment (Household Assistance) Bill 2009 [No. 2] - Third Reading - Read a third time

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The majority voted against a motion to read the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme (CPRS Fuel Credits) Bill 2009 [No. 2] and the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Amendment (Household Assistance) Bill 2009 [No. 2] for a third time.(Read more about the stages that a bill must pass through before becoming law here. )

This means that the majority of Senators do not want to pass the bills in the Senate and that they will not proceed to become law.

One Liberal Senator, Judith Troeth, crossed the floor to vote 'aye' with the government.(Read more about what it means to cross the floor in our FAQ section. )

Background to the bills

The Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme (CPRS Fuel Credits) Bill 2009 (No. 2) and the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Amendment (Household Assistance) Bill 2009 (No. 2) were introduced along with nine other bills to introduce the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme.

The scheme is an emission trading scheme designed to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in an effort to address climate change. It gives effect to Australia's obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol.

The design of the scheme has been criticised by the business community for threatening jobs and by environmentalists for not going far enough with its emission reduction targets.(Read more about these criticisms here.)

Altogether, the eleven bills are called:

References

Yes Yes Not passed by a small majority

30th Nov 2009, 11:52 AM – Senate Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 [No. 2] and related bills - Third Reading - Read a third time

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The majority voted against a motion to read the following bills for a third time:(Read more about the stages that a bill must pass through before becoming law here. )

  • Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 [No. 2]
  • Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme (Consequential Amendments) Bill 2009 [No. 2]
  • Australian Climate Change Regulatory Authority Bill 2009 [No. 2]
  • Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme (Charges-Customs) Bill 2009 [No. 2]
  • Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme (Charges-Excise) Bill 2009 [No. 2]
  • Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme (Charges-General) Bill 2009 [No. 2]
  • Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme (CPRS Fuel Credits) (Consequential Amendments) Bill 2009 [No. 2]
  • Excise Tariff Amendment (Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme) Bill 2009 [No. 2]
  • Customs Tariff Amendment (Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme) Bill 2009 [No. 2]

This means that the majority of Senators do not want to pass the bills in the Senate and that they will not proceed to become law.

Two Liberal Senators, Sue Boyce and Judith Troeth, crossed the floor to vote 'aye' with the government.(Read more about what it means to cross the floor in our FAQ section. )

Background to the bills

The Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 (No. 2) was introduced as part of a package of six bills along with five other related bills to introduce the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme. They reflect the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 and its related acts, as amended in the House of Representatives before it was negated in the Senate.(See that division here. )

The scheme is an emission trading scheme designed to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in an effort to address climate change. It gives effect to Australia's obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol.

The design of the scheme has been criticised by the business community for threatening jobs and by environmentalists for not going far enough with its emission reduction targets.(Read more about these criticisms here.)

The six bills that were introduced as a package are called:

The five other related bills are called:

References

Yes Yes (strong) Not passed by a small majority

25th Nov 2009, 4:13 PM – Senate Motions - Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Legislation - Defer question of third reading

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Family First Senator Steve Fielding that would have deferred the vote on whether to read the bills for a third time.(Read more about the stages that a bill must pass through before becoming law here. )

The motion was:

"That the question for the third reading of the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 (No. 2) and 10 related bills not be put until the third sitting day in February 2010."

The Liberal Party were split on the issue of whether to vote 'aye' along with their National Party colleagues, with some voting 'aye' and others 'no'.

Background to the bills

The Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 (No. 2) was introduced as part of a package of six bills along with five other related bills to introduce the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme. They reflect the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 and its related acts, as amended in the House of Representatives before it was negated in the Senate.(See that division here. )

The scheme is an emission trading scheme designed to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in an effort to address climate change. It gives effect to Australia's obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol.

The design of the scheme has been criticised by the business community for threatening jobs and by environmentalists for not going far enough with its emission reduction targets.(Read more about these criticisms here.)

The six bills that were introduced as a package are called:

The five other related bills are called:

References

No No Not passed by a modest majority

25th Nov 2009, 12:42 PM – Senate Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 [No. 2] and related bills - Second Reading - Read a second time

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to read the bills for a second time.(Read more about the stages that a bill must pass through before becoming law here. )

This means that the majority agree with the main idea of the bills, which was to introduce a Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme

Background to the bills

The Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 (No. 2) was introduced as part of a package of six bills along with five other related bills to introduce the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme. They reflect the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 and its related acts, as amended in the House of Representatives before it was negated in the Senate.(See that division here. )

The scheme is an emission trading scheme designed to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in an effort to address climate change. It gives effect to Australia's obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol.

The design of the scheme has been criticised by the business community for threatening jobs and by environmentalists for not going far enough with its emission reduction targets.(Read more about these criticisms here.)

The six bills that were introduced as a package are called:

The five other related bills are called:

References

Yes Yes (strong) Passed by a large majority

25th Nov 2009, 12:35 PM – Senate Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 [No. 2] and related bills - Second Reading - Refer to committee

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Senator Rachel Siewert.

It would have amended the original motion "That these bills be now read a second time" with the following:

At the end of the motion, add “and that:

(a) the bills, the multi-billion dollar adjustment to the bills, as agreed by the Coalition and the Government in November 2009, and the amendments required to implement that agreement, be referred to the Economics Legislation Committee for inquiry and report by 12.30pm on 1 December 2009;

(b) the Minister representing the Treasurer provide to that committee by 30 November 2009, for consideration as part of that inquiry, any modelling or analysis commissioned by Treasury and/or the Department of Climate Change and all documents prepared by Treasury in relation to the August 2009 Frontier Economics report on the economic impact of the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme;(Read that report here (1.6 MB) )

(c) the Senate meet from 1 December to 3 December 2009 to consider the bills;

(d) further consideration of the bills be an order of the day for the day the committee presents its report”.

Background to the bills

The Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 (No. 2) was introduced as part of a package of six bills along with five other related bills to introduce the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme. They reflect the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 and its related acts, as amended in the House of Representatives before it was negated in the Senate.(See that division here. )

The scheme is an emission trading scheme designed to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in an effort to address climate change. It gives effect to Australia's obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol.

The design of the scheme has been criticised by the business community for threatening jobs and by environmentalists for not going far enough with its emission reduction targets.(Read more about these criticisms here.)

The six bills that were introduced as a package are called:

The five other related bills are called:

References

absent No Not passed

25th Nov 2009, 12:24 PM – Senate Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 [No. 2] and related bills - Second Reading - Defer consideration

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Nationals Senator John Williams.

It would have amended the original motion "That these bills be now read a second time" with the following:

At the end of the motion, add:

and further consideration of the bills, which will impose the single largest structural change to the Australian economy, be made an order of the day for the first sitting day after:

(a) the Copenhagen Climate Change Summit has concluded; and

(b) the United States Senate has clarified its position by finally voting on the American Clean Energy and Security Act (the Waxman-Markey bill).

The Liberal Party was split on this amendment, with some voting 'aye' along with their National Party colleagues and some voting 'no'. This split within a major party is quite unusual and reflects the controversy of this policy.

Background to the bills

The Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 (No. 2) was introduced as part of a package of six bills along with five other related bills to introduce the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme. They reflect the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 and its related acts, as amended in the House of Representatives before it was negated in the Senate.(See that division here. )

The scheme is an emission trading scheme designed to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in an effort to address climate change. It gives effect to Australia's obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol.

The design of the scheme has been criticised by the business community for threatening jobs and by environmentalists for not going far enough with its emission reduction targets.(Read more about these criticisms here.)

The six bills that were introduced as a package are called:

The five other related bills are called:

References

No No Not passed by a modest majority

25th Nov 2009, 12:14 PM – Senate Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 [No. 2] and related bills - Second Reading - Commit to reducing emissions

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The majority voted against an motion introduced by Greens Senator Bob Brown.

This would have amended the original motion "That these bills be now read a second time" with the following:

At the end of the motion, add:

provided that the Government first commits to entering the climate treaty negotiations at the end of 2009 with an unconditional commitment to reduce emissions by at least 25 per cent below 1990 levels by 2020 and a willingness to reduce emissions by 40 per cent below 1990 levels by 2020 in the context of a global treaty.

Background to the bills

The Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 (No. 2) was introduced as part of a package of six bills along with five other related bills to introduce the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme. They reflect the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 and its related acts, as amended in the House of Representatives before it was negated in the Senate.(See that division here. )

The scheme is an emission trading scheme designed to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in an effort to address climate change. It gives effect to Australia's obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol.

The design of the scheme has been criticised by the business community for threatening jobs and by environmentalists for not going far enough with its emission reduction targets.(Read more about these criticisms here.)

The six bills that were introduced as a package are called:

The five other related bills are called:

References

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

25th Nov 2009, 11:01 AM – Senate Business - Rearrangement - Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme legislation

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The majority voted in favour of a motion introduced by Labor Senator Joe Ludwig, which was:

That, on Wednesday, 25 November 2009:

(a) the hours of meeting shall be 9.30 am to 6.30 pm and 7.30 pm to 11.40 pm;

(b) the routine of business from 7.30 pm shall be consideration of the government business order of the day relating to the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 (No. 2) and 10 related bills; and

(c) the question for the adjournment of the Senate shall be proposed at 11 pm.

This is a procedural motion that Senator Ludwig introduced to ensure that the Senate has sufficient time to finish considering these Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme bills this week.

The Liberal Party was split in this division with twelve voting in favour of the motion and seven voting against it.(Read more about what it means for a senator to cross the floor and rebel against their party in our FAQ section. )

Background to the bills

The Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 (No. 2) was introduced as part of a package of six bills along with five other related bills to introduce the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme. They reflect the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 and its related acts, as amended in the House of Representatives before it was negated in the Senate.(See that division here. )

The scheme is an emission trading scheme designed to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in an effort to address climate change. It gives effect to Australia's obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol.

The design of the scheme has been criticised by the business community for threatening jobs and by environmentalists for not going far enough with its emission reduction targets.(Read more about these criticisms here.)

The six bills that were introduced as a package are called:

The five other related bills are called:

Yes Yes Passed by a modest majority

17th Nov 2009, 1:15 PM – Senate Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 [No. 2] - First Reading - Proceed without formalities

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The motion that "the bill may proceed without formalities" failed to gain a majority. An equal number of MPs voted 'aye' and 'no', which means that the motion failed.

This motion is a procedural motion and, according to Odgers' Australian Senate Practice, "has the effect of suspending the requirements, otherwise imposed by the standing orders, for stages of the passage of the bill or bills to take place on different days, for notice of motions for such stages, and for the printing and certification of the bill or bills during passage".(Read the relevant part of Odgers' Australian Senate Practice here. ) Because this motion failed, the bill will have go through the usual delays provided by the standing orders.

Background to the bill

The Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 (No. 2) was introduced as part of a package of six bills along with five other related bills to introduce the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme. It is identical to the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 as amended in the House of Representatives before it was negated in the Senate.(See that division here. )

The scheme is an emission trading scheme designed to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in an effort to address climate change. It gives effect to Australia's obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol.

The design of the scheme has been criticised by the business community for threatening jobs and by environmentalists for not going far enough with its emission reduction targets.(Read more about these criticisms here.)

The six bills that were introduced as a package are called:

The five other related bills are called:

References

Yes Yes Not passed

13th Aug 2009, 11:13 AM – Senate Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 and related bills - Second Reading - Read a second time

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The majority voted against a motion to read the bills for a second time.(Read more about the stages that a bill must pass through here. )

This means that the majority disagreed with the main idea of the bills, which was to introduce the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme, and that the bills will no longer proceed.

Background to the bills

The Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 was introduced as part of a package of six bills along with five other related bills to introduce the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme.(Read more about the scheme on Wikipedia. ) This is an emission trading scheme designed to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in an effort to address climate change. The scheme gives effect to Australia's obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol.

The design of the scheme has been criticised by the business community for threatening jobs and by environmentalists for not going far enough with its emission reduction targets.(Read more about these criticisms here.)

The six bills that were introduced as a package are called:

The five other related bills are called:

References

Yes Yes (strong) Not passed by a small majority

13th Aug 2009, 11:06 AM – Senate Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 and related acts - Second Reading - Commit to reducing emissions

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Christine Milne. This means that the motion was rejected.

The motion was the following:

At the end of the motion ["That these bills be now read a second time"], add:

provided that the Government first commits to entering the climate treaty negotiations at the end of 2009 with an unconditional commitment to reduce emissions by at least 25 per cent below 1990 levels by 2020 and a willingness to reduce emissions by 40 per cent below 1990 levels by 2020 in the context of a global treaty.

Background to the bills

The Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme Bill 2009 was introduced as part of a package of six bills along with five other related bills to introduce the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme.(Read more about the scheme on Wikipedia. ) This is an emission trading scheme designed to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in an effort to address climate change. The scheme gives effect to Australia's obligations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Kyoto Protocol.

The design of the scheme has been criticised by the business community for threatening jobs and by environmentalists for not going far enough with its emission reduction targets.(Read more about these criticisms here.)

The six bills that were introduced as a package are called:

The five other related bills are called:

References

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

4th Dec 2008, 10:04 AM – Senate Motions - Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme - Delay introduction

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Liberal MP Michaelia Cash, which means that it was unsuccessful. The motion was:

That the Senate-

(a) notes and commends the sensible action taken by Labor Senators Sterle and Hutchins and also the Labor Member for Throsby, Ms George, in expressing concern over the proposed Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme (CPRS);

(b) notes the concern expressed publicly by a number of industries that may be potentially affected by the proposed CPRS including BlueScope Steel, Nyrstar, Qantas and Visy; and

(c) calls on the Government to delay the introduction of the proposed CPRS until these concerns are addressed.

No No Not passed by a small majority

How "voted moderately for" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 3 150 150
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 7 70 70
MP voted against policy 6 0 60
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 1 1 2
Total: 221 282

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 221 / 282 = 78%.

And then