How Linda Reynolds voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should increase investment in renewable energy technologies

Division Linda Reynolds Supporters vote Division outcome

16th Jun 2020, 4:50 PM – Senate Motions - Mining - Transition to renewables

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Queensland Senator Larissa Waters (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) since the Sydney Morning Herald and The Agereported on 11 June 2020 that international insurance companies Liberty Mutual, HDI-Talanx and Aspen Re were underwriting work on Adani's Carmichael coal mine, Liberty Mutual and HDI-Talanx have publicly stated that they will not provide future policies to the Adani Carmichael project, and Aspen Re is 'reviewing its underwriting appetite for fossil fuels',

(ii) existing coverage extends to early work only and Adani has still not secured insurance for the complete construction and operation of the Carmichael mine,

(iii) many major companies have refused to be involved in any part of the climate-wrecking project, including:

(A) at least sixteen global insurers, and

(B) at least sixty-five major insurance, construction, engineering, finance and haulage companies, and

(iv) in the ten years since this mine was announced, the Adani group has:

(A) misrepresented the number of jobs the Carmichael mine would create,

(B) illegally released contaminated water into protected wetlands and the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage area, and

(C) been criminally convicted in relation to giving false and misleading information to the Queensland regulator in relation to unlawful clearing activities; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to:

(i) recognise that the Adani Carmichael coal mine project is unviable and withdraw its support for the project,

(ii) ban all new thermal coal mining in the Galilee Basin and plan a just transition for workers in existing coal mines, and

(iii) invest in renewable energy projects that will actually create jobs without turbo-charging the climate crisis.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

26th Feb 2020, 4:15 PM – Senate Motions - Renewable Energy - Invest in renewables

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Tasmanian Senator Anne Urquhart (Labor), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that the Leader of the Liberal National Party in the Queensland Parliament, Mrs Deb Frecklington, has promised to require government-owned energy companies to invest in renewable energy generation;

(b) supports increased investment in renewable power as the cheapest and cleanest means of supplying our future energy needs; and

(c) calls on the Federal Liberal National Party to support further investment in renewables.

No Yes Not passed by a small majority

16th Oct 2019, 4:35 PM – Senate Motions - Climate Change - Address and adapt

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The majority voted against an amended motion, which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(ii) investing in renewable energy is essential to ensure real action on climate change, and

(iii) strong climate action is needed, to protect the prosperity of future generations of Australians and to meet our international obligations under the Paris climate change accords;

(b) acknowledges that any responsible government must modernise our economy and adapt to inevitable climate impacts;

(c) understands that every Australian deserves a government that looks to the future and makes the necessary policy reforms and investments to secure that future;

(d) notes that projects, such as the proposed hydrogen production facility at Bell Bay, should have bipartisan support;

(e) further notes that Tasmania is a renewable energy leader but that Australia cannot get left behind by other countries, such as Japan and South Korea;

(f) understands that Tasmania Hydrogen can provide one-quarter of Northern Tasmania's export growth over the next 10 years;

(g) recognises that, once complete, the proposed facility would use renewable energy to split water into hydrogen and oxygen through a process called electrolysis, with the product then able to be sold as liquid hydrogen, or combined with nitrogen to create ammonia; and

(h) notes that the regional development ramifications for a project like this should be recognised, including an estimated 500 to 1000 jobs which could be created, and that the flow-on effect to other businesses and service providers would be ongoing.

No Yes Not passed by a small majority

15th Oct 2019, 6:04 PM – Senate Motions - Australian Capital Territory: Renewable Energy - Congratulate

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Victorian Senator Richard Di Natale (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate congratulates the Australian Capital Territory Government for reducing emissions by 40% since 1990, and this month securing 100% of the Territory's power from renewable energy, meaning Australian Parliament House and the offices of Senator Canavan and the Member for Hughes, Mr Craig Kelly, and the Prime Minister's Office, among others, are all running completely on clean energy.

No Yes Not passed by a small majority

9th Sep 2019, 5:07 PM – Senate Motions - Energy - Clean energy industry

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Queensland Senator Larissa Waters (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) the Clean Energy Regulator's The Renewable Energy Target 2018 Administrative ReportThe acceleration in renewables investment, highlights the record investment in large scale, commercial and industrial and household renewables over the last year,

(ii) the Australian Bureau of Statistics reports that jobs in renewable energy in Queensland grew by 1,550 in 2017-2018, an increase of 44 percent on the previous year,

(iii) the Green Energy Markets 2019 update report, states that 2,012 full time equivalent Queenslanders were employed in the installation and sale of rooftop solar PV in June 2019,

(iv) the recently announced shortlist for the Queensland Government's Renewables 400 tender includes ten renewable energy generation and storage developments projected to collectively deliver 3,000 jobs in central and far north Queensland, including 350 direct jobs created by the Clarke Creek Wind and Solar Farm, west of Rockhampton, and

(v) the Adani Carmichael mine, if it proceeds, is expected to create between 800 and 1,500 jobs in the construction phase, with 100 ongoing jobs; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to:

(i) deliver real jobs that last, by backing the job-creating, climate-fixing clean energy industry, and

(ii) fund industry development, training and other support to ensure that regional workers and communities, including coal workers, have secure long-term futures.

No Yes Not passed by a small majority

1st Aug 2019, 12:13 PM – Senate Committees - Energy - Consistent national energy policy

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Tasmanian Senator Anne Urquhart (Labor), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) Tasmania, and mainland Australia, stand to reap significant benefits from the Battery of the Nation and Marinus Link projects, including lower power prices, lower carbon emissions, additional income and new jobs,

(ii) the initial feasibility study into Marinus Link concludes that the Marinus Link and related Battery of the Nation projects are only economically viable in the 'High Emission Reduction Target' scenario, which includes a significant increase in renewable energy investment, over a business as usual scenario over the next decade,

(iii) according to the feasibility study, under a business as usual 'neutral' scenario, which corresponds to the Federal Government's approach to renewable energy investment, the Marinus Link and Battery of the Nation projects have a net cost of up to $730 million dollars, while under the High Emission Reduction Target scenario, the projects have a net benefit of up to $482 million,

(iv) the Marinus Link and Battery of the Nation projects will not go ahead unless they deliver net benefits to Tasmania and the nation,

(v) after announcing 14 energy policies, the Federal Government still refuses to introduce any policy to support renewable energy investment to replace the 2020 Renewable Energy Target, which will be fully acquitted next year, and

(vi) without consistent national energy policy that supports renewable energy investment, the Marinus Link and Battery of the Nation projects will not go ahead; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to introduce a consistent national energy policy that supports renewable energy investment through the 2020s and addresses carbon emissions as well as affordability and reliability in the electricity sector, to ensure the Marinus Link and Battery of the Nation projects go ahead.

No Yes Not passed by a small majority

4th Jul 2019 – Senate Motions - Energy - Affordable, clean, renewable energy

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The majority voted against an amendment to a motion introduced by West Australian Senator Louise Pratt (Labor), which means it failed. The amendment was introduced by Queensland Senator Larissa Waters (Greens).

Motion text

(1) After paragraph (a)(i), add:

(ia) Government is giving this gas away with no royalties and missing out on $90 billion in revenue with gas companies sitting on $324 billion in PRRT credits before they have to pay a cent in tax and that neither the government or opposition want to change this cosy set up or threaten future political donations,

(2) Omit subparagraph (a)(iii), substitute:

(iii) Australia has become the world's largest gas exporter, thanks to environmental approvals issued by Labor governments, while our own businesses face difficulties in securing affordable gas supplies;

(3) After subparagraph (a)(vi), insert:

(vii) gas exports increases pressure on domestic gas extraction, placing farmers' land and water under sustained threat from fracking for unconventional gas, and

(viii) new gas production will increase global emissions 25% more than new coal projects and the industry threatens our ability to stay below 1.5 degrees of warming,

(4) Omit paragraph (b), substitute:

(b) calls on the Government to take real action to reduce the cost of energy in Australia by:

(i) bringing big gas and fossil fuel companies to heel, supporting the transition to renewable energy and ensuring Australian users have access to affordable, clean, renewable energy;

(ii) guaranteeing a reduction in gas energy prices for Australian businesses by subsidising renewable energy developments to levels that can sustain competitive Australian manufacturing, as well as ensuring ample gas clean energy supply for Australian users; and

(iii) delivering a national energy policy that will end investment uncertainty and deliver a modern energy system including cheaper, reliable and clean power.

Original motion text

(a) notes that:

(i) since 2013, gas prices for manufacturers have skyrocketed, increasing by up to four times their levels in 2013,

(ii) according to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, spiralling gas prices have resulted in three manufacturers closing down and threaten the viability of many more businesses,

(iii) Australia has become the world’s largest gas exporter while our own businesses face difficulties in securing affordable gas supplies,

(iv) the Federal Government continues to refuse to bring big gas companies to heel by pulling the trigger on gas export controls,

(v) under Prime Minister Morrison, power prices have continued to skyrocket, with wholesale power price futures contracts up by 33% since former Prime Minister, Mr Malcolm Turnbull was forced out of The Lodge, and

(vi) Prime Minister Morrison’s election promise to reduce wholesale power prices to $70/mwh by 2021 would only bring prices back to the levels seen under his predecessor, Mr Turnbull; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to take real action to reduce the cost of energy in Australia by:

(i) bringing big gas companies to heel by finally pulling the trigger on gas export controls and ensuring Australian users have access to affordable Australian gas,

(ii) guaranteeing a reduction in gas prices for Australian businesses to levels that can sustain competitive Australian manufacturing, as well as ensuring ample gas supply for Australian users, and

(iii) delivering a national energy policy that will end investment uncertainty and deliver a modern energy system including cheaper, reliable and clean power.

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

26th Nov 2018, 3:51 PM – Senate Motions - Renewable Energy - Cheap, reliable and clean

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The majority voted in favour of a motion introduced by Independent Senator Tim Storer, which means it succeeded. Motions like these don't make any legal changes on their own but since they represent the will of the Senate.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) Australia in blessed with world-class renewable energy and energy storage resources,

(ii) the price of renewable energy continues to decline, setting new records year on year,

(iii) utility-scale wind and solar farms are the cheapest form of new-build electricity generation in Australia today,

(iv) Australia has the highest penetration of rooftop solar in the world, with close to two million households having installed solar systems to help them to reduce their power bills, and

(v) South Australia's Honesdale Power Reserve, the world's biggest grid connected lithium-ion battery, is showing how new technology can put downward pressure on electricity prices and allow for the successful integration of high levels of wind and solar energy; and

(b) agrees that renewable energy, coupled with energy storage technologies, can provide "fair dinkum power" that is cheap, reliable and clean.

No Yes Passed by a small majority

12th Sep 2018, 10:04 AM – Senate Treasury Laws Amendment (Accelerated Depreciation for Small Business Entities) Bill 2018 - in Committee - Encourage energy-efficiency

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The majority voted against an amendment introduced by Greens Senator Nick McKim, which means it failed.

Senator McKim explained that:

This amendment would encourage and incentivise small businesses to invest into infrastructure and assets that would result in an energy-efficiency dividend for small businesses, which would bring Australia's emissions profile down as well as improve the bottom line of small businesses. It would also encourage and incentivise small businesses to reduce their use of fossil fuels and to fuel-switch from gas to electricity.

absent Yes Not passed by a modest majority

8th Feb 2018, 12:11 PM – Senate Motions - Mining - Against Adani

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The majority voted against this motion, which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes, with concern, that the Adani Group (Adani) is on the record blatantly misrepresenting the number of jobs its polluting Carmichael coal mine would create;

(b) condemns Adani's deception in inflating its jobs figures sevenfold, until it was forced under oath to reveal that the true figure is in fact 1,464 direct and indirect jobs over the life of the project, rather than the 10 000 claimed;

(c) further notes that the carbon pollution from Adani's mine would significantly contribute to dangerous global warming, further endangering the Great Barrier Reef and the 70 000 jobs that rely on it; and

(d) asserts that, rather than relying on a polluting, deceitful company to provide jobs for Queenslanders, federal and state Governments should invest in renewable energy, service industries and manufacturing as the best drivers of Queensland jobs.

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

8th Feb 2018, 12:05 PM – Senate Motions - Defence Industry - Do not support

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The majority voted against a motion, which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes:

(i) the Australian Government's plans to make Australia one of the top ten weapons manufacturers globally, raising us from the 20th to the 10th spot, and

(ii) the dangerous and destructive effects of the global arms trade in fuelling conflicts;

(b) re-affirms the comments of World Vision CEO, Mr Tim Costello, that Australia will be "exporting death and profiting from bloodshed";

(c) condemns the fact that the Government plans to loan $3 billion to arms manufacturers, which is equal to Australia's entire foreign aid budget, which has suffered $11 billion in cuts since 2014, and follows attempts by the Government to cut $2 billion from higher education; and

(d) calls on the Government to cease immediately this plan to turn Australia into a mercenary nation of arms dealers, and instead use the funds to revitalise our manufacturing industry around renewable energy, electric cars, advanced medical technology and education services.

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

12th Sep 2017, 4:12 PM – Senate Motions - Renewable Energy - Against target and subsidies

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Senator David Leyonhjelm, which means the motion failed.

Motion text

That the Senate agrees that—

(a) the renewable energy target should not continue beyond 2023;

(b) no scheme to subsidise renewable energy generation or mandate a particular market share for renewable energy generation should replace it; and

(c) renewable energy projects not already approved by the Clean Energy Regulator be ineligible to receive subsidies via renewable energy certificates.

No No Not passed by a large majority

5th Sep 2017, 5:02 PM – Senate Motions - Energy - Coal not clean

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The majority voted in favour of a motion: That the Senate does not consider coal-fired power to be clean.

This motion was introduced by WA Senator Rachel Siewert (Greens) also on behalf of Victorian Senator Richard Di Natale (Greens).

No Yes Passed by a small majority

15th Sep 2016, 11:35 PM – Senate Budget Savings (Omnibus) Bill 2016 - Third Reading - Pass the bill

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to pass the bill in the Senate. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to read the bill for a third time.

Since the bill's already passed in the House of Representatives, it will now become law.

What does this bill do?

This bill does a lot of work! It crosses eight different portfolios, from Education to the Treasury. Read more about it in the bills digest.

For example, the bill:

Yes No Passed by a modest majority

15th Sep 2016, 10:27 PM – Senate Budget Savings (Omnibus) Bill 2016 - in Committee - ARENA

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Yes No Passed by a modest majority

15th Sep 2016, 9:25 PM – Senate Budget Savings (Omnibus) Bill 2016 - Second Reading - Agree to the main idea

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to read the bill for a second time. In other words, they agreed with the main idea of the bill and will now discuss it in more detail.

What does this bill do?

This bill does a lot of work! It crosses eight different portfolios, from Education to the Treasury. Read more about it in the bills digest.

For example, the bill:

Yes No Passed by a modest majority

15th Sep 2016, 9:12 PM – Senate Budget Savings (Omnibus) Bill 2016 - Second Reading - ARENA funding

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Larissa Waters, which means it was unsuccessful.

Motion text

At the end of the motion, add:

, but the Senate condemns this bill for ripping $500 million from the Australian Renewable Energy Agency's clean energy innovation grants as a dangerous and irresponsible act of sabotage, especially in a climate emergency and global transition to clean energy, and because it leaves the Coalition and Labor parties with no meaningful plan to meet Australia's Renewable Energy Target and pollution reduction target agreed at the Paris climate conference.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

3rd May 2016, 4:02 PM – Senate Motions - Budget - Australian Renewable Energy Agency

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The majority voted against a motion that called for the Senate to resolve that funding for the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) won't be reduced. The motion was introduced by Greens Senator Larissa Waters.

Wording of the motion

That the Senate—

(a) notes:

(i) how well positioned Australia is to take advantage of the huge jobs and commercial opportunities from investing in research and development in clean energy technologies,

(ii) That the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) is the institution that will enable us to be global leaders in clean technology innovation, and

(iii) That the 2014 Budget proposed $1.3 billion in cuts to ARENA for the financial years 2017-18 to 2021-22 which have so far been blocked but which have caused considerable uncertainty for ARENA; and

(b) resolves That the $1.5 billion of currently legislated funding for ARENA for the financial years 2016-17 to 2021-22 will not be reduced.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

17th Mar 2016, 12:39 PM – Senate Motions - Climate Change - Support a rapid transition to clean energy

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Larissa Waters. It called for the government to stop supporting new coal mining developments and start supporting a rapid transition to clean energy.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) the Chief Scientist, Dr Alan Finkel, stated on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's Q&A program that Australia is 'losing the battle' against global warming,

(ii) Professor Terry Hughes has told 'The Conversation' that Australia can either develop new coal mines or protect the Great Barrier Reef, but 'we can't possibly do both',

(iii) coral bleaching caused by global warming has already caused the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority to raise its bleaching alert to Level 2, and the United States' National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has upgraded its Coral Reef Watch warning for the far northern Great Barrier Reef to Alert Level 2, the highest threat level, and

(iv) the mining and burning of coal is driving dangerous global warming which threatens the Great Barrier Reef; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to abandon its support for the Adani mega coal mine and Abbot Point coal port expansion, and support a rapid transition to 100 per cent clean energy as soon as possible, and at least 90 per cent clean energy by 2030.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

9th Sep 2015, 4:28 PM – Senate Motions - Newcastle City Council Investment Policies - Environmental investment

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by NSW Senator Lee Rhiannon (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) Newcastle City Council recently passed an update to its investment policies that notes the Council's preference for environmentally and socially responsible investment, and notes reports that this policy will see the Council shift its investments away from coal and fossil fuels,

(ii) the decision has been heavily criticised by the Minister for Industry and Science (Mr Macfarlane), despite warnings from scientists that Australia must act to stave off catastrophic climate change, and

(iii) an opinion poll conducted after the Council's decision found that only one in four Newcastle residents think investing in coal is financially safe; and

(b) congratulates the Newcastle City Council on updating its investment policy and joining councils across New South Wales, such as Lake Macquarie City Council, Willoughby Council, the City of Sydney, Marrickville Council, Leichhardt Council and Lismore City Council, in adopting policies regarding environmentally and socially responsible investment.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

23rd Jun 2015, 11:03 PM – Senate Renewable Energy (Electricity) Amendment Bill 2015 - Third Reading - Pass the bill

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to pass the bill (in parliamentary jargon, they voted to read the bill for a third time).

Purpose of the bill

The bill amends the Commonwealth Renewable Energy Target (RET) scheme by, for example, reducing the large-scale renewable energy target (LRET) and replacing the requirement for two-yearly reviews of the operation of the RET scheme with annual statements by the Clean Energy Regulator (CER). Further detail is available in the bills digest.

Read more on ABC News.

absent No Passed by a modest majority

17th Jun 2015, 6:02 PM – Senate Renewable Energy (Electricity) Amendment Bill 2015 - Second Reading - Agree to the bill's main idea

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to agree with the bill's main idea (in parliamentary jargon, they voted to read the bill for a second time).

Main idea of the bill

The bill amends the Commonwealth Renewable Energy Target (RET) scheme by, for example, reducing the large-scale renewable energy target (LRET) and replacing the requirement for two-yearly reviews of the operation of the RET scheme with annual statements by the Clean Energy Regulator (CER). Further detail is available in the bills digest.

Yes No Passed by a modest majority

28th Oct 2014, 4:07 PM – Senate Motions - Mining - Acknowledge massive economic benefits

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The majority supported acknowledging "the massive economic benefits" of the black coal mining industry.

Wording of the motion

National Party Senator Barry O'Sullivan wanted the Senate to acknowledge:

the massive economic benefits delivered to this nation by the black coal industry and the importance it has for the employment fortunes of miners and other professionals in this nation, noting that Australia should maintain a diverse and sensible energy mix.

Background to the motion

Prime Minister Tony Abbott and his Government has been criticised for being too in favour of coal mining at the expense of addressing climate change (for example, see ABC News).

absent No Passed by a modest majority

17th Jul 2014, 10:41 AM – Senate Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2014 — In Committee — Funding to ARENA

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The majority voted in favour of a motion "that schedule 5 stand as printed", which means that the schedule will remain unchanged. This motion was put in response to an amendment to oppose that schedule, which was introduced by Greens Senator Christine Milne.

Schedule 5 amends the funding for the Australian Renewable Energy Agency ('ARENA').(Read more about this schedule in the explanatory memorandum. ) Senator Milne explained that "if the government's schedule stands, ARENA's funding would drop from just over a billion dollars down to $341 million".(Read Senator Milne's full explanation and the associated debate here, after 10.28 am. )

Background to the bills

The Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2014 and related bills were introduced to repeal the carbon pricing mechanism, which was introduced by the Australian Labor Party while in government. The Coalition described the mechanism as a “carbon tax” and removing it was a key policy platform during the 2013 election.(You can read more about the Coalition's policy to remove the carbon price here. )

The carbon pricing mechanism commenced on 1 July 2012.(For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website. ) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon is fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market, though the Labor Government did announce plans to bring this forward to 1 July 2014 just before they were defeated by the Coalition in the 2013 election.

This is the third time that this package of bills have been introduced. The first time, they were rejected in the Senate during the third reading stage.(See that division here. ) The second time, they were rejected in the Senate during the committee stage.(See that division here. Read more about this second rejection of this package of bills on ABC News here or on the World Today here.)

The bills included in this package are the following:

Yes No Passed by a small majority

10th Jul 2014, 12:12 PM – Senate Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No. 2] - In Committee - Schedule 5

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This division relates to the Policy For a carbon price.

The majority voted against a motion "that schedule 5 stand as printed", which means that the majority opposed the schedule.

This motion was put in response to an earlier motion to oppose schedule 5 introduced by Greens Senator Christine Milne. Schedule 5 provides for a reduction in funding for the Australian Renewable Energy Agency.(Read more about schedule 5 in the bill's explanatory memorandum. )

Background to the bills

The Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 (No. 2) and related bills were introduced to remove the carbon pricing mechanism, which was introduced by the Australian Labor Party while in government. The Coalition described the mechanism as a “carbon tax” and removing it was a key policy platform during the 2013 election.(You can read more about the Coalition's policy to remove the carbon price here. )

The carbon pricing mechanism commenced on 1 July 2012.(For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website. ) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon is fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market, though the Labor Government did announce plans to bring this forward to 1 July 2014 just before they were defeated by the Coalition in the 2013 election.

This is the second time that this package of bills has been introduced, after they were rejected in the Senate during the third reading stage the first time round.(See that division here. )

The other related bills that were introduced along with the Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 (No. 2) are:

The Clean Energy (Income Tax Rates and Other Amendments) Bill 2013 (No. 2) was previously rejected in the Senate at second reading stage.(See that division here.)

Yes No Not passed by a small majority

How "voted strongly against" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 1 10 10
MP voted against policy 21 0 210
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 3 3 6
Total: 13 226

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 13 / 226 = 5.8%.

And then