How Raff Ciccone voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should increase investment in renewable energy technologies

Division Raff Ciccone Supporters vote Division outcome

16th Oct 2019, 4:35 PM – Senate Motions - Climate Change - Address and adapt

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The majority voted against an amended motion, which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(ii) investing in renewable energy is essential to ensure real action on climate change, and

(iii) strong climate action is needed, to protect the prosperity of future generations of Australians and to meet our international obligations under the Paris climate change accords;

(b) acknowledges that any responsible government must modernise our economy and adapt to inevitable climate impacts;

(c) understands that every Australian deserves a government that looks to the future and makes the necessary policy reforms and investments to secure that future;

(d) notes that projects, such as the proposed hydrogen production facility at Bell Bay, should have bipartisan support;

(e) further notes that Tasmania is a renewable energy leader but that Australia cannot get left behind by other countries, such as Japan and South Korea;

(f) understands that Tasmania Hydrogen can provide one-quarter of Northern Tasmania's export growth over the next 10 years;

(g) recognises that, once complete, the proposed facility would use renewable energy to split water into hydrogen and oxygen through a process called electrolysis, with the product then able to be sold as liquid hydrogen, or combined with nitrogen to create ammonia; and

(h) notes that the regional development ramifications for a project like this should be recognised, including an estimated 500 to 1000 jobs which could be created, and that the flow-on effect to other businesses and service providers would be ongoing.

Yes Yes Not passed by a small majority

15th Oct 2019, 6:04 PM – Senate Motions - Australian Capital Territory: Renewable Energy - Congratulate

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Victorian Senator Richard Di Natale (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate congratulates the Australian Capital Territory Government for reducing emissions by 40% since 1990, and this month securing 100% of the Territory's power from renewable energy, meaning Australian Parliament House and the offices of Senator Canavan and the Member for Hughes, Mr Craig Kelly, and the Prime Minister's Office, among others, are all running completely on clean energy.

Yes Yes Not passed by a small majority

9th Sep 2019, 5:07 PM – Senate Motions - Energy - Clean energy industry

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Queensland Senator Larissa Waters (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) the Clean Energy Regulator's The Renewable Energy Target 2018 Administrative ReportThe acceleration in renewables investment, highlights the record investment in large scale, commercial and industrial and household renewables over the last year,

(ii) the Australian Bureau of Statistics reports that jobs in renewable energy in Queensland grew by 1,550 in 2017-2018, an increase of 44 percent on the previous year,

(iii) the Green Energy Markets 2019 update report, states that 2,012 full time equivalent Queenslanders were employed in the installation and sale of rooftop solar PV in June 2019,

(iv) the recently announced shortlist for the Queensland Government's Renewables 400 tender includes ten renewable energy generation and storage developments projected to collectively deliver 3,000 jobs in central and far north Queensland, including 350 direct jobs created by the Clarke Creek Wind and Solar Farm, west of Rockhampton, and

(v) the Adani Carmichael mine, if it proceeds, is expected to create between 800 and 1,500 jobs in the construction phase, with 100 ongoing jobs; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to:

(i) deliver real jobs that last, by backing the job-creating, climate-fixing clean energy industry, and

(ii) fund industry development, training and other support to ensure that regional workers and communities, including coal workers, have secure long-term futures.

absent Yes Not passed by a small majority

1st Aug 2019, 12:13 PM – Senate Committees - Energy - Consistent national energy policy

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Tasmanian Senator Anne Urquhart (Labor), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) Tasmania, and mainland Australia, stand to reap significant benefits from the Battery of the Nation and Marinus Link projects, including lower power prices, lower carbon emissions, additional income and new jobs,

(ii) the initial feasibility study into Marinus Link concludes that the Marinus Link and related Battery of the Nation projects are only economically viable in the 'High Emission Reduction Target' scenario, which includes a significant increase in renewable energy investment, over a business as usual scenario over the next decade,

(iii) according to the feasibility study, under a business as usual 'neutral' scenario, which corresponds to the Federal Government's approach to renewable energy investment, the Marinus Link and Battery of the Nation projects have a net cost of up to $730 million dollars, while under the High Emission Reduction Target scenario, the projects have a net benefit of up to $482 million,

(iv) the Marinus Link and Battery of the Nation projects will not go ahead unless they deliver net benefits to Tasmania and the nation,

(v) after announcing 14 energy policies, the Federal Government still refuses to introduce any policy to support renewable energy investment to replace the 2020 Renewable Energy Target, which will be fully acquitted next year, and

(vi) without consistent national energy policy that supports renewable energy investment, the Marinus Link and Battery of the Nation projects will not go ahead; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to introduce a consistent national energy policy that supports renewable energy investment through the 2020s and addresses carbon emissions as well as affordability and reliability in the electricity sector, to ensure the Marinus Link and Battery of the Nation projects go ahead.

Yes Yes Not passed by a small majority

4th Jul 2019 – Senate Motions - Energy - Affordable, clean, renewable energy

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The majority voted against an amendment to a motion introduced by West Australian Senator Louise Pratt (Labor), which means it failed. The amendment was introduced by Queensland Senator Larissa Waters (Greens).

Motion text

(1) After paragraph (a)(i), add:

(ia) Government is giving this gas away with no royalties and missing out on $90 billion in revenue with gas companies sitting on $324 billion in PRRT credits before they have to pay a cent in tax and that neither the government or opposition want to change this cosy set up or threaten future political donations,

(2) Omit subparagraph (a)(iii), substitute:

(iii) Australia has become the world's largest gas exporter, thanks to environmental approvals issued by Labor governments, while our own businesses face difficulties in securing affordable gas supplies;

(3) After subparagraph (a)(vi), insert:

(vii) gas exports increases pressure on domestic gas extraction, placing farmers' land and water under sustained threat from fracking for unconventional gas, and

(viii) new gas production will increase global emissions 25% more than new coal projects and the industry threatens our ability to stay below 1.5 degrees of warming,

(4) Omit paragraph (b), substitute:

(b) calls on the Government to take real action to reduce the cost of energy in Australia by:

(i) bringing big gas and fossil fuel companies to heel, supporting the transition to renewable energy and ensuring Australian users have access to affordable, clean, renewable energy;

(ii) guaranteeing a reduction in gas energy prices for Australian businesses by subsidising renewable energy developments to levels that can sustain competitive Australian manufacturing, as well as ensuring ample gas clean energy supply for Australian users; and

(iii) delivering a national energy policy that will end investment uncertainty and deliver a modern energy system including cheaper, reliable and clean power.

Original motion text

(a) notes that:

(i) since 2013, gas prices for manufacturers have skyrocketed, increasing by up to four times their levels in 2013,

(ii) according to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, spiralling gas prices have resulted in three manufacturers closing down and threaten the viability of many more businesses,

(iii) Australia has become the world’s largest gas exporter while our own businesses face difficulties in securing affordable gas supplies,

(iv) the Federal Government continues to refuse to bring big gas companies to heel by pulling the trigger on gas export controls,

(v) under Prime Minister Morrison, power prices have continued to skyrocket, with wholesale power price futures contracts up by 33% since former Prime Minister, Mr Malcolm Turnbull was forced out of The Lodge, and

(vi) Prime Minister Morrison’s election promise to reduce wholesale power prices to $70/mwh by 2021 would only bring prices back to the levels seen under his predecessor, Mr Turnbull; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to take real action to reduce the cost of energy in Australia by:

(i) bringing big gas companies to heel by finally pulling the trigger on gas export controls and ensuring Australian users have access to affordable Australian gas,

(ii) guaranteeing a reduction in gas prices for Australian businesses to levels that can sustain competitive Australian manufacturing, as well as ensuring ample gas supply for Australian users, and

(iii) delivering a national energy policy that will end investment uncertainty and deliver a modern energy system including cheaper, reliable and clean power.

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

How "voted moderately for" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 3 30 30
MP voted against policy 1 0 10
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 1 1 2
Total: 31 42

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 31 / 42 = 74%.

And then