How Ken O'Dowd voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should deregulate Australia's wheat export market so that bulk wheat export is no longer done through a single exporter (which is known as a 'single desk' policy)

Division Ken O'Dowd Supporters vote Division outcome

31st Oct 2012, 6:25 PM – Representatives Wheat Export Marketing Amendment Bill 2012 - Second Reading - Read a second time

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to read the bill for a second time.(Read more about the stages that a bill must pass through here. )

This means that the majority agree with the main idea of the bill and that the House can now consider the bill in more detail.

One member, Nationals MP Tony Crook, crossed the floor to vote 'aye' with the Government.(Read more about what it means to rebel and cross the floor in our FAQ section. )

Background to the bill

The bill was introduced to transition the wheat export industry to full deregulation by abolishing the Wheat Export Accreditation Scheme and winding up Wheat Export Australia.(Read more about the effect of the Wheat Export Marketing Amendment Bill 2012 in its bills digest (333 KB). )

Prior to 2008, Australia's wheat export market operated under a ' single desk' policy.(Read more about the history of the regulation of the wheat industry here. ) This means that bulk wheat exports were directed through a single exporter of bulk wheat under the Australian Wheat Board International Limited (AWB International). The Export Wheat Commission managed the export of non-bulk wheat (that is, bagged or container wheat).

The single desk policy ended with the introduction of the Wheat Export Marketing Bill 2008 and related bill,(Read more about the bills in their bills digests. The digest for the Wheat Export Marketing Bill 2008 is available here (198 KB). The digest for the Wheat Export Marketing (Repeal and Consequential Amendments) Bill 2008 is available here (53.1 KB). ) which established the Wheat Export Accreditation Scheme that was regulated through the Wheat Exports Australia. This introduced competition into the bulk wheat export market so that "[r]ather than forcing growers to sell their wheat through a single exporter they [were] able to choose from a number of accredited exporters as well as domestic outlets."(See the explanatory memorandum of the Wheat Export Marketing Bill 2008.)

References

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

31st Oct 2012, 6:15 PM – Representatives Wheat Export Marketing Amendment Bill 2012 - Second Reading - Decline to read a second time

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Nationals MP John Cobb. This means that the motion was unsuccessful.

The motion was:

That all words after "That" be omitted with a view to substituting the following words:

"the House declines to give this bill a second reading and:(Read more about the stages that a bill must pass through here. )

(1) calls on the Government to extend the operation of Wheat Exports Australia for not less than six months after the resumption of the 44th Parliament to enable the government of the day to modify Wheat Exports Australia or replace it with a another body, to better represent the needs of the wheat industry; and

(2) notes that the Coalition commits to a consultation process that will commence immediately and provide stakeholders with a forum to outline what wheat industry issues need to be addressed."

Background to the bill

The bill was introduced to transition the wheat export industry to full deregulation by abolishing the Wheat Export Accreditation Scheme and winding up Wheat Export Australia.(Read more about the effect of the Wheat Export Marketing Amendment Bill 2012 in its bills digest (333 KB). )

Prior to 2008, Australia's wheat export market operated under a ' single desk' policy.(Read more about the history of the regulation of the wheat industry here. ) This means that bulk wheat exports were directed through a single exporter of bulk wheat under the Australian Wheat Board International Limited (AWB International). The Export Wheat Commission managed the export of non-bulk wheat (that is, bagged or container wheat).

The single desk policy ended with the introduction of the Wheat Export Marketing Bill 2008 and related bill,(Read more about the bills in their bills digests. The digest for the Wheat Export Marketing Bill 2008 is available here (198 KB). The digest for the Wheat Export Marketing (Repeal and Consequential Amendments) Bill 2008 is available here (53.1 KB). ) which established the Wheat Export Accreditation Scheme that was regulated through the Wheat Exports Australia. This introduced competition into the bulk wheat export market so that "[r]ather than forcing growers to sell their wheat through a single exporter they [were] able to choose from a number of accredited exporters as well as domestic outlets."(See the explanatory memorandum of the Wheat Export Marketing Bill 2008.)

References

Yes No Not passed by a small majority

How "voted very strongly against" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 1 0 50
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 1 0 10
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 0 0 0
Total: 0 60

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 0 / 60 = 0.0%.

And then