How Kristy McBain voted compared to someone who believes that Members of Parliament (MPs) and Senators should vote to suspend standing and sessional orders (that is, the procedural rules of Parliament) so that their colleagues can introduce motions for Parliament to vote on even when the the procedural rules would prevent them from doing so

Division Kristy McBain Supporters vote Division outcome

23rd Mar 2021, 4:21 PM – Representatives Business - Rearrangement - Don't let a vote happen

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of disagreeing with a motion introduced by MP for Warringah Zali Steggall (Independent). The motion was to suspend the usual procedural rules - known as standing orders - in order to let a vote happen. Because the majority voted to disagree with this motion, the vote will not go ahead.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the Member for Warringah from moving the following motion immediately—

(1) That the House notes:

(a) the Australian Human Rights Commission and the Law Council of Australia have identified that the Sex Discrimination Act does not prohibit sexual harassment in all circumstance and workplaces;

(b) the events exposed in Parliament House over the past month have highlighted the urgent need to amend the Act to ensure that Members of Parliament are liable for and protected from sexual harassment;

(c) in 2008, the Senate Standing Committee on Legal and Constitutional Affairs recommended amending the Act to include a broad prohibition on sexual harassment in any area of public life;

(d) following the Dyson Heydon inquiry, the Law Council of Australia launched its National Action Plan to Address Sexual Harassment in the Legal Profession which recommends that the Sex Discrimination Act be amended to include the language that "a person must not sexually harass another person"; and

(e) the Sex Discrimination Act (Prohibiting All Sexual Harassment) Bill 2021 seeks to make that amendment; and

(2) that so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent private Members' business order of the day No. 29, the Sex Discrimination Amendment (Prohibiting All Sexual Harassment) Bill 2021, being called on immediately and given priority over all other business for final determination of the House.

No No (strong) Passed by a small majority

22nd Mar 2021, 3:22 PM – Representatives Motions - Prime Minister; Attempted Censure - Don't let a vote happen

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of disagreeing with a motion introduced by Grayndler MP and Leader of the Opposition Anthony Albanese (Labor), which means the motion failed. The motion was to suspend the usual procedural rules - known as standing orders - in order to let a vote happen.

Motion text

That so much of the standing and sessional orders be suspended as would prevent the Leader of the Opposition moving the following motion forthwith—

That the House:

(1) notes that:

(a) the Prime Minister told the House last Thursday about the Gaetjens inquiry, "those inquiries are being made by the Secretary of my department" and "this work is being done by the Secretary of my department" but the Secretary of this department has given evidence to the Senate today that he told the Prime Minister on 9 March that he was putting his inquiry on hold;

(b) the Prime Minister has repeatedly refused to answer whether he has asked his staff if they sought to undermine Brittany Higgins' loved ones; and

(c) the Prime Minister told the House last Tuesday he was briefed by the Commissioner of the Federal Police on the contents of the dossier which contains allegations of serious sexual assault against the Attorney-General but the Commissioner of the Federal Police has told the Senate today he did not brief the Prime Minister on the details of the allegations; and

(2) therefore, condemns the Prime Minister for failing to give straight answers to simple questions about his Government's response to the reported sexual assault of Brittany Higgins and his handling of serious sexual assault allegations against the Attorney-General.

No No (strong) Passed by a small majority

10th Dec 2020, 9:46 AM – Representatives Motions - Workplace Relations - Don't let a vote happen

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of disagreeing with a motion introduced by Leader of the Opposition Anthony Albanese, which means it failed.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the Leader of the Opposition from moving the following motion immediately:

That the House:

(1) notes the industrial relations legislation introduced by the Government yesterday cuts the take-home pay of workers; and

(2) therefore, pursuant to standing order 37(c), calls on the Minister for Industrial Relations to immediately discharge the order of the day, Fair Work Amendment (Supporting Australia's Jobs and Economic Recovery) Bill 2020, from the Notice Paper.

No No (strong) Passed by a small majority

9th Dec 2020, 3:11 PM – Representatives Motions - Prime Minister - Don't let a vote happen

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of disagreeing with a motion introduced by Grayndler MP Anthony Albanese (Labor), which means the motion failed. The motion was to suspend the usual procedural rules - known as standing orders - in order to let a vote happen.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the Leader of the Opposition from moving the following motion immediately—That the House:

(1) notes that:

(a) on Monday, the Prime Minister refused to guarantee that no worker would be worse off because of his industrial relations changes;

(b) today, the Government has introduced legislation which leaves workers worse off;

(c) at a time when wages are already at record lows, the Prime Minister's changes will mean workers' take-home pay will be cut;

(d) while claiming the economy is going so well that Jobkeeper and JobSeeker can be cut, the Prime Minister is using the pandemic as cover to cut take-home pay;

(e) it's not just businesses who've had a difficult year, workers have too;

(f) nurses, supermarket workers, cleaners, childcare workers, teachers, truck drivers, aged care workers and all the frontline workers in Australia who have kept the nation running during this pandemic are being given a Christmas gift of a pay cut by the Prime Minister; and

(g) this is not the first time the Government has attacked take-home pay; and

(2) therefore, condemns the Prime Minister for using the pandemic to cut the take-home pay of Australian workers.

No No (strong) Passed by a small majority

8th Dec 2020, 4:30 PM – Representatives Motions - Climate Change - Don't let a vote happen

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of disagreeing with a motion introduced by Melbourne MP Adam Bandt (Greens) to suspend the usual rules - known as standing orders - to allow a vote to happen.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the member for Melbourne from moving the following motion immediately—That the House:

(1) notes:

(a) the Prime Minister told parliament on 3 December 2020 that Australia would be participating at the Climate Ambition Summit on 12 December 2020 and that 'it will be a great opportunity to correct the mistruths that are often presented';

(b) the Climate Ambition Summit co-host and COP26 President Alok Sharma has stated that 'announcements must show genuine progress from existing policies and Paris targets' and that 'there will be no space for general statements'; and

(c) reports today in the media that Australia does not have a confirmed speaking role at the summit; and

(2) calls on the Prime Minister to attend the House by 2 pm Tuesday 8 December to make a statement to advise the House whether Australia is speaking at the Climate Ambition Summit and table any correspondence with the summit organisers relating to whether Australia is speaking at the summit.

No No (strong) Passed by a small majority

2nd Dec 2020, 10:19 AM – Representatives Motions - Climate Change - Don't let a vote happen

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of disagreeing with a motion to suspend the usual parliamentary rules - known as standing orders - to allow a vote in respect to climate change take place. This means the desired vote (see motion text below) won't happen.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the Member for Melbourne from moving the following motion immediately—That the House:

(1) declares an environment and climate emergency;

(2) recognises that:

(a) as signatories to the Paris Agreement, Australia must ensure a safe and stable climate system, which requires limiting global temperature rises to well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase even further to 1.5 degrees Celsius;

(b) the Bureau of Meteorology has advised this Parliament that under current targets, the world is on track for a temperature rise of 3.4 degrees, and that means up to 4.4 degrees of warming in Australia, making much of the country uninhabitable within our children's lifetimes; and

(c) today New Zealand will move to declare a climate emergency joining other countries including England, France, Germany, Spain, Sweden, Canada and Japan; and

(3) acknowledges that no aspect of Australia's economy, society and environment will be left untouched by a breakdown of the climate system and that the Government and the Parliament must take urgent action before 2030.

absent No (strong) Passed by a small majority

30th Nov 2020, 3:23 PM – Representatives Motions - Pensions and Benefits - Don't let a vote happen

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion to disagree with a motion to suspend the usual procedural rules - known as standing orders - to allow a vote in respect to robodebt to happen. This means the desired vote (see text below) won't take place.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the Leader of the Opposition from moving the following motion immediately—That the House:

(1) notes that:

(a) as Minister for Social Services, the Prime Minister was personally responsible for the design of the illegal robodebt scheme;

(b) as Treasurer, the Prime Minister continued his illegal robodebt scheme, announcing it would save the budget $2 billion;

(c) after deposing Malcolm Turnbull, the Prime Minister continued his robodebt scheme for years despite knowing it was illegal;

(d) the Prime Minister announced his robodebt scheme would save the budget $2 billion but it has in fact cost taxpayers at least $1.2 billion;

(e) the Prime Minister's illegal robodebt scheme harmed thousands of Australians and led to the suicide and self-harm of vulnerable people; and

(f) no one in this eight-year-old Liberal-National Government is willing to take responsibility for the Prime Minister's illegal robodebt scheme; and

(2) therefore, condemns the Prime Minister for designing and maintaining the illegal robodebt scheme which led to the suicide and self-harm of vulnerable people.

absent No (strong) Passed by a small majority

30th Nov 2020, 12:31 PM – Representatives Motions - Mcbride, Mr David William - Don't let a vote happen

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of disagreeing with a motion to suspend the usual procedural rules - known as standing orders - that would have allowed another vote to take place.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the following motion being moved immediately—That the House:

(1) notes that:

(a) on 19 November 2020 the Australian Defence Force's Afghanistan Inquiry Report was released, revealing shocking revelations of war crimes allegedly committed by ADF personnel;

(b) Major David McBride had been bravely warning Defence about command failings and a deliberate blindness to the conduct of the war in internal reports since 2014 and of course his career was ruined;

(c) when the ADF took no effective action after a multitude of approaches from him, Major McBride disclosed information to the ABC, which formed the basis for The Afghan Files, which raised the alarm on all of the matters now before us in the Afghanistan Inquiry Report;

(d) Mr McBride has been charged with numerous Commonwealth offences as a direct response to his heroic whistleblowing; and

(e) Mr McBride now faces the possibility of spending the rest of his life in prison; and

(2) calls on the Government to drop all charges against Mr McBride.

absent No (strong) Passed by a large majority

26th Oct 2020, 7:21 PM – Representatives Recycling and Waste Reduction Charges (Excise) Bill 2020 - Third Reading - Let a vote happen

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion to suspend standing orders - the procedural rules of parliament - to allow a vote to happen without delay. In this case, the vote is whether to read the bill for a third time, which is parliamentary jargon for passing the bill.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the motion for the third reading being moved without delay.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

26th Oct 2020, 7:00 PM – Representatives Recycling and Waste Reduction Charges (Customs) Bill 2020 - Third Reading - Let a vote happen

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion to suspend standing orders - the procedural rules of parliament - to allow a vote to happen without delay. In this case, the vote is whether to read the bill for a third time, which is parliamentary jargon for passing the bill.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the motion for the third reading being moved without delay.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

26th Oct 2020, 6:32 PM – Representatives Recycling and Waste Reduction Charges (General) Bill 2020 - Third Reading - Let a vote happen

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion to suspend standing orders - the procedural rules of parliament - to allow a vote to happen without delay. In this case, the vote is whether to read the bill for a third time, which is parliamentary jargon for passing the bill.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the motion for the third reading being moved without delay.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

26th Oct 2020, 6:20 PM – Representatives Recycling and Waste Reduction (Consequential and Transitional Provisions) Bill 2020 - Third Reading - Let a vote happen

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion to suspend standing orders - the procedural rules of parliament - to allow a vote to happen. In this case, the vote is whether to read the bill for a third time, which is parliamentary jargon for passing the bill.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the motion for the third reading being moved without delay.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

26th Oct 2020, 6:06 PM – Representatives Recycling and Waste Reduction Bill 2020 and others - Third Reading - Speed things along

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion to suspend standing orders, which are the procedural rules of parliament. Because this vote was successful, the vote on whether to pass the bill in the House of Representatives - known as giving it a third reading - will occur straight away.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the motion for the third reading being moved without delay.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

26th Oct 2020, 3:10 PM – Representatives Motions - Morrison Government - Don't let a vote happen

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of disagreeing with a motion introduced by Leader of the Opposition and MP for Grayndler Anthony Albanese (Labor), which means it failed. The motion was to suspend the usual procedural rules - known as standing orders - in order to let another vote happen.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the Leader of the Opposition from moving the following motion forthwith:

That the House:

(1) notes the Morrison Government is weighed down by scandal and integrity issues, including:

(a) the corrupt sports rorts scheme, with colour-spreadsheets used to divide up taxpayer money, and emails going in and out of the Prime Minister's office;

(b) airport rorts in which the Government paid $30 million for a piece of land worth $3 million;

(c) stacking the Administrative Appeals Tribunal with Liberal mates;

(d) paying a Liberal Party mate and former Crosby Textor pollster more than a million dollars for taxpayer-funded market research;

(e) the Prime Minister's Office recommending long-term Liberal mate Peter Crone for a lucrative Government contract;

(f) the ASIC Chair and former Deputy Chair together claiming more than $180,000 to which they weren't entitled;

(g) Australia Post spending $20,000 on Cartier watches;

(h) reports the Assistant Treasurer used taxpayer-funded staff to branch stack; and

(i) the Minister for Energy being involved in too many scandals to count; and

(2) therefore condemns the Prime Minister for treating taxpayers' money as though it is his own.

No No (strong) Passed by a small majority

20th Oct 2020, 4:32 PM – Representatives Motions - Crown Resorts - Don't let a vote happen

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of disagreeing with a motion to suspend standing orders to allow a vote to happen.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the member for Clark from moving the following motion forthwith:

That the House:

(1) notes the allegations of Crown Resort's links to organised crime, illegal offshore activities, insider trading, money laundering, illegal modification of gambling devices, domestic violence and drug trafficking; and

(2) calls on the Australian Government to establish a Royal Commission to inquire into and report on Crown, including but not limited to:

(a) the allegations of criminal activity made by the Member for Denison in the House of Representatives in October 2017;

(b) the alleged criminal activity reported by Nine newspapers and 60 Minutes in July 2019;

(c) the allegations of criminal activity made by the Member for Clark in the House of Representatives in July 2019;

(d) the allegations of criminal activity made by the Member for Clark and the ABC in October 2019;

(e) the response to these allegations by state and federal agencies;

(f) the conduct of current and former associates of Crown including shareholders, managers and board members;

(g) the conduct of current and former federal and state politicians and party officials relevant to the Crown matter;

(h) specifically the Federal Government's and Opposition's refusal to endorse a motion, put by the Member for Clark on 15 October 2019, calling for a Royal Commission into the Australian casino industry; and

(i) any related matters.

No No (strong) Passed by a small majority

20th Oct 2020, 4:29 PM – Representatives Motions - Western Sydney Airport - Don't let a vote happen

Show detail

The majority in favour of disagreeing with a motion introduced by MP for Ballarat Catherine King (Labor), which means it failed.

Motion text

That so much of standing orders be suspended as would prevent the Member for Ballarat from moving the following motion immediately:

That the House:

(1) notes that:

(a) the Audit Office found the Government paid $30 million for a piece of land that was worth $3 million;

(b) the Minister for Infrastructure has described this purchase as a "bargain";

(c) last night, the Audit Office confirmed it provided information to the Australian Federal Police on 10 July this year about possible defrauding of the Commonwealth;

(d) the Australian Federal Police is now investigating possible criminal conduct;

(e) the Government never misses an opportunity to rort taxpayer funds; and

(f) the Prime Minister announced a Commonwealth Integrity Commission years ago but has failed to introduce legislation to establish one; and

(2) therefore, calls on the Minister for Infrastructure to attend the House and explain all he knows about this dirty deal and why he says it's a "bargain".

No No (strong) Passed by a small majority

3rd Sep 2020, 5:36 PM – Representatives Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Amendment (Streamlining Environmental Approvals) Bill 2020 - Second Reading - Suspend the usual rules to let third reading happen

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion:

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the motion for the third reading being moved without delay.

In other words, they voted to suspend the usual procedural rules - known as standing orders - so that they could vote on whether to pass the bill - that is, give it a third reading - immediately.

Because this vote was successful, the House will now consider whether to pass the bill immediately.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

3rd Sep 2020, 5:07 PM – Representatives Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Amendment (Streamlining Environmental Approvals) Bill 2020 - Second Reading - Don't let a vote happen

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of disagreeing with a motion introduced by the Member for Watson and Manager of Opposition Business Tony Burke (Labor), which means the motion failed.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the Member for Watson from moving the following motion immediately—That the House:

(1) allow debate on the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Amendment (Streamlining Environmental Approvals) Bill 2020 before the House to continue until every member wishing to speak on the second reading has done so;

(2) notes that this will allow members to explain

(a) the government's attempt to rehash a failed Abbott-era environment bill; and

(b) that the bill is inconsistent with the interim report of the Samuel Review commissioned by the government.

No No (strong) Passed by a small majority

3rd Sep 2020, 4:49 PM – Representatives Motions - Prime Minister - Don't let a vote happen

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of disagreeing with a motion introduced by MP for Watson Tony Burke (Labor), which means it failed. The motion was to suspend the usual procedural rules - known as standing orders - to allow a vote to happen.

Motion text

That so much of standing orders be suspended as would prevent the Manager of Opposition Business from moving the following motion immediately—That the House:

(1) notes that:

(a) thanks to this Prime Minister, members opposite have voted more times to shut down debate than they have voted on legislation;

(b) if the government cuts short debate on the next bill to be announced, it will be the second time this week that the Prime Minister has shut down debate on a bill of critical importance; and

(c) this Prime Minister has a disdain for democratic debate; and

(2) invites the Prime Minister to remain in the chamber and make a statement on this matter.

No No (strong) Passed by a small majority

1st Sep 2020, 7:58 PM – Representatives Higher Education Support Amendment (Job-Ready Graduates and Supporting Regional and Remote Students) Bill 2020 - Third Reading - Speed things along

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion to suspend the usual procedural rules - known as standing orders - so that the House can vote on whether to pass the bill - known as giving it a third reading - without delay.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the motion for the third reading being moved without delay.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

1st Sep 2020, 4:57 PM – Representatives Motions - Assistant Treasurer - Don't let a vote happen

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of disagreeing with the a motion to suspend the usual procedural rules - known as standing orders - to let a vote happen.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the Member for Blaxland from moving the following motion immediately—

That the House:

(1) notes:

(a) extensive media reporting the Assistant Treasurer was involved in wide-scale branch stacking;

(b) clear evidence the Assistant Treasurer saw and approved plans for electorate staff to engage in branch stacking;

(c) reports the Assistant Treasurer used taxpayer money to pay one of his best friends to produce party political material soliciting donations for the Liberal Party;

(d) the Assistant Treasurer's conduct breaches both paragraph 4.1 of the Prime Minister's Ministerial Standards and paragraph 2 of the Special Minister of State's Determination;

(e) the Prime Minister has failed to take any action against the Assistant Treasurer, who is doing too much branch-stacking and not enough HomeBuilding; and

(f) in the middle of the first recession in three decades, the Assistant Treasurer should be focussed on helping the Australian people and doing his job, not helping himself; and

(2) calls on the Assistant Treasurer to attend this House and make a statement for a period not exceeding 30 minutes explaining his actions to the Australian people.

No No (strong) Passed by a small majority

31st Aug 2020, 12:13 PM – Representatives Motions - Covid-19: Aged Care - Don't let a vote happen

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of disagreeing with a motion introduced by Leader of the Opposition and Member for Grayndler Anthony Albanese (Labor). The motion was to suspend the usual procedural rules - known as standing orders - in order to let a vote happen.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the Leader of the Opposition from moving the following motion immediately:

That the House:

(1) notes that:

(a) the Australian Government funds and regulates residential aged care;

(b) the Australian Government has not produced a COVID-19 plan for aged care;

(c) more than 400 aged care residents have died from COVID-19; and

(d) the aged care Royal Commission has said that if the Australian Government had acted upon previous reviews of aged care, the suffering of many people could have been avoided; and

(2) therefore, calls on the Prime Minister to:

(a) produce a COVID-19 plan for aged care that delivers:

(i) minimum staffing levels;

(ii) reduced home care waiting lists;

(iii) more transparency;

(iv) public reporting;

(v) adequate PPE;

(vi) staff training;

(vii) a better surge workforce strategy; and

(viii) additional funding for the aged care Royal Commission; and

(b) sack Senator Colbeck from the aged care portfolio.

No No (strong) Passed by a small majority

27th Aug 2020, 9:50 AM – Representatives Motions - Covid-19: Hydroxychloroquine - Don't let a vote happen

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of disagreeing with a motion to suspend the usual procedural rules - known as standing orders - to allow a vote to happen.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the Member for McMahon from moving the following motion—That the House:

(1) notes that:

(a) on 25 August 2020, the Member for Hughes gave a speech in the Federation Chamber supporting the use of hydroxychloroquine to treat COVID-19;

(b) in his speech, the Member said that "media bias", "groupthink" and the "complete abandonment of reason" were driving a "war" on hydroxychloroquine and "the big hand of government … interfer[ing] in a doctor-patient relationship", and cited a number of medical commentators including:

(i) Professor Christian Perronne, who is being investigated by the French College of Physicians for his comments on hydroxychloroquine;

(ii) Dr Harvey Risch, who was rebuked by 25 Yale University colleagues for promoting "conspiracy theories, purported hoaxes, and the views of zealots"; and

(iii) Dr Kulvinder Gill, who was criticised by other Canadian doctors for misleading tweets on hydroxychloroquine;

(c) in Australia, potential therapies are assessed for safety and efficacy by the independent Therapeutic Goods Administration, and the TGA "strongly discourages the use of hydroxychloroquine to treat COVID-19 … or prevent COVID-19"; and

(d) the National COVID-19 Clinical Evidence Taskforce, comprised of 29 peak health bodies, has also advised that "hydroxychloroquine is potentially harmful and no more effective than standard care"; and

(2) affirms that it is the responsibility of all public officeholders to acknowledge and support the independence and expertise of the TGA and counter misinformation and conspiracy theories.

No No (strong) Passed by a small majority

25th Aug 2020, 4:47 PM – Representatives Motions - Covid-19: State and Territory Border Closures - Don't let a vote happen

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of disagreeing with a motion to suspend the usual procedural rules - known as standing orders - to let a vote happen.

Motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the member for Brand from moving the following motion immediately:

That the House:

(1) notes that:

(a) today, the Federal Court found the Western Australian border closures were an 'effective' measure to combat COVID-19 entering the state;

(b) the Commonwealth, led by the Attorney-General who himself is a Western Australian, intervened in support of billionaire Clive Palmer's attempts to force open the borders against the will of the Western Australian people;

(c) the Commonwealth's subsequent withdrawal from the case prejudiced the Western Australian position, according to a Federal Court judge, and cost taxpayers unknown thousands of wasted dollars in legal fees;

(d) the Prime Minister and Attorney-General put the interests of a billionaire who is trying to bankrupt the state of Western Australia over the health of Western Australians; and

(e) the people of Western Australia will not forget this betrayal, and deserve an apology from the Attorney-General, the Prime Minister, and the Morrison Government; and

(2) therefore, calls on the Attorney-General to attend the House immediately and be given leave to make a ministerial statement explaining his government's actions.

No No (strong) Passed by a small majority

How "voted moderately for" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 14 700 700
MP voted against policy 7 0 350
MP absent 3 75 150
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 0 0 0
Total: 775 1200

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 775 / 1200 = 65%.

And then