← Basic divisions list

These divisions relate to the policy “for putting welfare payments onto restricted debit cards (known as cashless debit cards)”. Compare how a supporter of the policy would have voted to the division outcome.

18th Mar 2021, 2:43 PM – Senate Social Services Legislation Amendment (Strengthening Income Support) Bill 2021 - Second Reading – Mutual obligations and income management - Division No. 20

Supporters vote “No”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 9
Australian Labor Party (24% turnout) 6
Centre Alliance (100% turnout) 1
Country Liberal Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy President (0.0% turnout)
Independent (0.0% turnout)
Jacqui Lambie Network (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (50% turnout) 1
Liberal Party (86% turnout) 25
National Party (100% turnout) 3
Pauline Hanson's One Nation Party (100% turnout) 2
President (100% turnout) 1
Totals (66% turnout) 9 41

The majority voted against an amendment to the usual second reading motion, which is ”that the bill be read a second time”. Reading a bill for a second time in parliamentary jargon for agreeing with the main idea of the bill.

Amendment text

At the end of the motion, add: ", but the Senate calls on the Government to:

(a) […]

(b) abolish mutual obligations which are hurting unemployed Australians and making it harder to find work; and

(c) abolish all forms of compulsory income management from our social security system, including the Cashless Debit Card and the Basics Card".

9th Dec 2020, 10:08 PM – Senate Social Security (Administration) Amendment (Continuation of Cashless Welfare) Bill 2020 - Second Reading - Agree with the bill's main idea - Division No. 20

Supporters vote “Yes (strong)”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 9
Australian Labor Party (68% turnout) 17
Centre Alliance (0.0% turnout)
Country Liberal Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy President (100% turnout) 1
Independent (100% turnout) 1
Jacqui Lambie Network (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (50% turnout) 1
Liberal Party (83% turnout) 24
National Party (100% turnout) 3
Pauline Hanson's One Nation Party (50% turnout) 1
President (100% turnout) 1
Totals (79% turnout) 31 29

The majority voted in favour of a motion to agree with the main idea of the bill, which means that they can now discuss it in more detail. In parliamentary jargon, the majority voted to read the bill for a second time.

What is the bill's main idea?

The bill was introduced "to establish the Cashless Debit Card (CDC) as an ongoing program rather than a time-limited trial". The CDC program is controversial for many reasons, not least the limited evidence that it is benefiting the communities where it is currently in operation.

Read more about the program and what the bill does in the bills digest.

9th Dec 2020, 9:57 PM – Senate Social Security (Administration) Amendment (Continuation of Cashless Welfare) Bill 2020 - Second Reading - Withdraw the bill - Division No. 17

Supporters vote “No”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 9
Australian Labor Party (68% turnout) 17
Centre Alliance (0.0% turnout)
Country Liberal Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy President (100% turnout) 1
Independent (100% turnout) 1
Jacqui Lambie Network (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (50% turnout) 1
Liberal Party (83% turnout) 24
National Party (100% turnout) 3
Pauline Hanson's One Nation Party (50% turnout) 1
President (100% turnout) 1
Totals (79% turnout) 28 32

The majority voted against an amendment moved by WA Senator Patrick Dodson (Labor), which means it failed.

Motion text

Omit all words after "That", substitute: ", the bill be withdrawn and the Senate:

(a) notes that:

(i) thirteen years after the Howard Government's so-called Intervention in the Northern Territory, there is no evidence that compulsory, broad-based income management works,

(ii) the Minister decided to make the Cashless Debit Card trial permanent before reading the independent review by the University of Adelaide, and

(iii) this proposal is racially discriminatory, as approximately 68 per cent of the people impacted are First Nations Australians; and

(b) calls on the Government to:

(i) not roll out the Cashless Debit Card nationally, and

(ii) invest in evidence-based policies, job creation and services, rather than ideological policies like the Cashless Debit Card".

What does this bill do?

The bill was introduced "to establish the Cashless Debit Card (CDC) as an ongoing program rather than a time-limited trial". The CDC program is controversial for many reasons, not least the limited evidence that it is benefiting the communities where it is currently in operation.

Read more about the program and what the bill does in the bills digest.

9th Dec 2020, 12:23 AM – Senate Social Security (Administration) Amendment (Continuation of Cashless Welfare) Bill 2020 - Third Reading - Pass the bill - Division No. 25

Supporters vote “Yes (strong)”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 9
Australian Labor Party (84% turnout) 21
Centre Alliance (0.0% turnout)
Country Liberal Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy President (100% turnout) 1
Independent (100% turnout) 1
Jacqui Lambie Network (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (50% turnout) 1
Liberal Party (90% turnout) 26
National Party (100% turnout) 3
Pauline Hanson's One Nation Party (100% turnout) 2
President (100% turnout) 1
Totals (88% turnout) 34 33

The majority voted in favour of a motion to pass the bill in the Senate. In parliamentary jargon, the majority voted to read the bill for a third time. This means that the bill will now be sent back to the House of Representatives so that our MPs can decide whether they agree to the Senate amendments. If they agree, the bill will become law.

What does the bill do?

The bill was introduced "to establish the Cashless Debit Card (CDC) as an ongoing program rather than a time-limited trial". The CDC program is controversial for many reasons, not least the limited evidence that it is benefiting the communities where it is currently in operation.

Read more about the program and what the bill does in the bills digest.

9th Dec 2020, 12:19 AM – Senate Social Security (Administration) Amendment (Continuation of Cashless Welfare) Bill 2020 - in Committee - Keep items unchanged - Division No. 24

Supporters vote “Yes”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 9
Australian Labor Party (84% turnout) 21
Centre Alliance (0.0% turnout)
Country Liberal Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy President (100% turnout) 1
Independent (100% turnout) 1
Jacqui Lambie Network (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (50% turnout) 1
Liberal Party (90% turnout) 26
National Party (100% turnout) 3
Pauline Hanson's One Nation Party (100% turnout) 2
President (100% turnout) 1
Totals (88% turnout) 34 33

The majority voted in favour of keeping unchanged items (1), (2), (6) to (15), (17) to (49) and parts 2 and 3 of schedule 1. This division occurred after Tasmanian Senator Jacqui Lambie proposed that they be opposed.

More about the bill

The bill was introduced "to establish the Cashless Debit Card (CDC) as an ongoing program rather than a time-limited trial". The CDC program is controversial for many reasons, not least the limited evidence that it is benefiting the communities where it is currently in operation.

Read more about the program and what the bill does in the bills digest.

7th Dec 2020, 4:20 PM – Representatives Social Security (Administration) Amendment (Continuation of Cashless Welfare) Bill 2020 - Third Reading - Pass the bill - Division No. 3

Supporters vote “Yes (strong)”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 1
Australian Labor Party (81% turnout) 55
Centre Alliance (100% turnout) 1
Deputy Speaker (100% turnout) 1
Independent (100% turnout) 3
Katter's Australian Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (100% turnout) 5
Liberal Party (80% turnout) 44
National Party (80% turnout) 12
Speaker (0.0% turnout)
Totals (81% turnout) 62 61

The majority voted in favour of a motion to pass the bill in the House, which means that it will now be sent to the Senate for their consideration. In parliamentary jargon, the majority voted to read the bill for a third time.

What does the bill do?

The bill was introduced "to establish the Cashless Debit Card (CDC) as an ongoing program rather than a time-limited trial". The CDC program is controversial for many reasons, not least the limited evidence that it is benefiting the communities where it is currently in operation.

Read more about the program and what the bill does in the bills digest.

7th Dec 2020, 3:39 PM – Representatives Social Security (Administration) Amendment (Continuation of Cashless Welfare) Bill 2020 - Second Reading - Agree with bill's main idea - Division No. 2

Supporters vote “Yes (strong)”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 1
Australian Labor Party (76% turnout) 52
Centre Alliance (100% turnout) 1
Deputy Speaker (100% turnout) 1
Independent (100% turnout) 3
Katter's Australian Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (100% turnout) 5
Liberal Party (80% turnout) 44
National Party (80% turnout) 12
Speaker (0.0% turnout)
Totals (79% turnout) 62 58

The majority voted in favour of a motion to agree with the main idea of the bill, which means that they can now discuss it in more detail. In parliamentary jargon, the majority voted to read the bill for a second time.

What is the bill's main idea?

The bill was introduced "to establish the Cashless Debit Card (CDC) as an ongoing program rather than a time-limited trial". The CDC program is controversial for many reasons, not least the limited evidence that it is benefiting the communities where it is currently in operation.

Read more about the program and what the bill does in the bills digest.

11th Feb 2020, 4:19 PM – Senate Motions - Cashless Debit Card - Transparency and choice - Division No. 5

Supporters vote “No”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 9
Australian Labor Party (76% turnout) 19
Centre Alliance (0.0% turnout)
Country Liberal Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy President (100% turnout) 1
Jacqui Lambie Network (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (100% turnout) 2
Liberal Party (79% turnout) 23
National Party (100% turnout) 3
Pauline Hanson's One Nation Party (100% turnout) 2
President (100% turnout) 1
Totals (82% turnout) 29 33

The majority voted against a motion introduced by WA Senator Rachel Siewert (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that the Government is in discussions with the big four banks, major retailers and EFTPOS around a possible national rollout of the cashless debit card (CDC);

(b) recognises that compulsory income management disadvantages people on low incomes by limiting their ability to shop around and make savings where purchases can be made through cash;

(c) acknowledges that rolling out compulsory income management to people on income support payments would remove the choice and control they have over the financial products and services they use;

(d) further notes that the Australian National Audit Office found that there was no evidence that there has been a reduction in social harm following the introduction of the CDC;

(e) urges the big four banks, EFTPOS and major retailers not to facilitate any national rollout of compulsory income management, including the CDC; and

(f) calls on the Federal Government to be honest and transparent about its plans to rollout compulsory income management to income support recipients across Australia.

27th Nov 2019, 5:15 PM – Representatives Social Security (Administration) Amendment (Income Management to Cashless Debit Card Transition) Bill 2019 - Third Reading - Pass the bill - Division No. 18

Supporters vote “Yes (strong)”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 1
Australian Labor Party (87% turnout) 59
Centre Alliance (100% turnout) 1
Deputy Speaker (100% turnout) 1
Independent (100% turnout) 1 2
Katter's Australian Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (100% turnout) 4
Liberal Party (93% turnout) 52
National Party (87% turnout) 13
Speaker (0.0% turnout)
Totals (89% turnout) 72 63

The majority voted in favour of a motion to pass the bill in the House, which means it will now be sent to the Senate for their consideration. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to read the bill for a third time.

What does the bill do?

The bill was introduced in order to:

  • establish the Northern Territory (NT) and Cape York area as cashless debit card (CDC) trial areas and transition income management participants in these areas onto the cashless debit card trial in 2020
  • extend the end date for existing CDC trial sites from 30 June 2020 to 30 June 2021 and establish an end date of 30 June 2021 the proposed NT CDC trial site
  • establish an end date for the CDC trial in the Cape York area of 31 December 2021
  • remove the current cap of 15,000 CDC trial participants
  • enable people in the Bundaberg and Hervey Bay trial site to volunteer to participate in the trial
  • enable the Secretary of the Department of Social Services to advise a community body when a person has exited the CDC trial and
  • make changes to the CDC trial review and evaluation process.

27th Nov 2019, 5:09 PM – Representatives Social Security (Administration) Amendment (Income Management to Cashless Debit Card Transition) Bill 2019 - Consideration in Detail - Agree with bill as amended - Division No. 16

Supporters vote “Yes (strong)”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 1
Australian Labor Party (87% turnout) 59
Centre Alliance (100% turnout) 1
Deputy Speaker (100% turnout) 1
Independent (100% turnout) 1 2
Katter's Australian Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (100% turnout) 4
Liberal Party (93% turnout) 52
National Party (87% turnout) 13
Speaker (0.0% turnout)
Totals (89% turnout) 72 63

The majority voted in favour of a motion "that this bill, as amended, be agreed to." This ends the consideration in detail stage of the bill and means that our MPs can now discuss whether to pass the bill (that is, read it for a third time).

What does the bill do?

The bill was introduced in order to:

  • establish the Northern Territory (NT) and Cape York area as cashless debit card (CDC) trial areas and transition income management participants in these areas onto the cashless debit card trial in 2020
  • extend the end date for existing CDC trial sites from 30 June 2020 to 30 June 2021 and establish an end date of 30 June 2021 the proposed NT CDC trial site
  • establish an end date for the CDC trial in the Cape York area of 31 December 2021
  • remove the current cap of 15,000 CDC trial participants
  • enable people in the Bundaberg and Hervey Bay trial site to volunteer to participate in the trial
  • enable the Secretary of the Department of Social Services to advise a community body when a person has exited the CDC trial and
  • make changes to the CDC trial review and evaluation process.

27th Nov 2019, 11:36 AM – Representatives Social Security (Administration) Amendment (Income Management to Cashless Debit Card Transition) Bill 2019 - Second Reading - Agree with the bill's main idea - Division No. 2

Supporters vote “Yes (strong)”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 1
Australian Labor Party (93% turnout) 63
Centre Alliance (100% turnout) 1
Deputy Speaker (100% turnout) 1
Independent (100% turnout) 1 2
Katter's Australian Party (0.0% turnout)
Liberal National Party (100% turnout) 4
Liberal Party (96% turnout) 54
National Party (87% turnout) 13
Speaker (0.0% turnout)
Totals (93% turnout) 73 67

The majority voted in favour of a motion to agree with the main idea of the bill, which means they can now discuss it in more detail. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to read the bill for a second time.

What is the bill's main idea?

The bill was introduced in order to:

  • establish the Northern Territory (NT) and Cape York area as cashless debit card (CDC) trial areas and transition income management participants in these areas onto the cashless debit card trial in 2020
  • extend the end date for existing CDC trial sites from 30 June 2020 to 30 June 2021 and establish an end date of 30 June 2021 the proposed NT CDC trial site
  • establish an end date for the CDC trial in the Cape York area of 31 December 2021
  • remove the current cap of 15,000 CDC trial participants
  • enable people in the Bundaberg and Hervey Bay trial site to volunteer to participate in the trial
  • enable the Secretary of the Department of Social Services to advise a community body when a person has exited the CDC trial and
  • make changes to the CDC trial review and evaluation process.

27th Nov 2019, 11:26 AM – Representatives Social Security (Administration) Amendment (Income Management to Cashless Debit Card Transition) Bill 2019 - Second Reading - Disagree with the bill - Division No. 1

Supporters vote “No (strong)”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 1
Australian Labor Party (94% turnout) 64
Centre Alliance (100% turnout) 1
Deputy Speaker (100% turnout) 1
Independent (100% turnout) 2 1
Katter's Australian Party (0.0% turnout)
Liberal National Party (100% turnout) 4
Liberal Party (93% turnout) 52
National Party (87% turnout) 13
Speaker (0.0% turnout)
Totals (92% turnout) 67 72

The majority voted against an amendment to the usual second reading motion that the bill be read a second time, which is parliamentary jargon for the House agreeing with the main idea of the bill. This means the amendment failed.

Amendment text

That all words after "That" be omitted with a view to substituting the following words:

"the House:

(1) declines to give the bill a second reading;

(2) notes that, 12 years after the Intervention in the Northern Territory, there is no evidence that compulsory broad-based income management has worked to improve outcomes for First Nations people; and

(3) calls on the Government not to expand the cashless debit card, and to instead invest in evidence-based policies, programs and services, including:

(a) job creation and economic development;

(b) education, training and TAFE;

(c) health and rehabilitation services; and

(d) services for women and young people"

3rd Apr 2019, 9:19 PM – Senate Social Security (Administration) Amendment (Income Management and Cashless Welfare) Bill 2019 - Third Reading - Pass the bill - Division No. 13

Supporters vote “Yes (strong)”

Party Yes No
Australian Conservatives (0.0% turnout)
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 9
Australian Labor Party (72% turnout) 18
Centre Alliance (100% turnout) 2
Country Liberal Party (0.0% turnout)
Derryn Hinch's Justice Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy President (100% turnout) 1
Independent (67% turnout) 1 1
Liberal Democratic Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (0.0% turnout)
Liberal Party (57% turnout) 13
National Party (67% turnout) 2
Pauline Hanson's One Nation Party (0.0% turnout)
President (100% turnout) 1
United Australia Party (0.0% turnout)
Totals (66% turnout) 40 10

The majority voted in favour of a motion to agree with the remaining stages of this bill so that the bill can now be passed. In parliamentary jargon, they voted in read the bill for a third time. Since the Senate agreed to certain amendments to this bill, it will now return to the House of Representatives for their consideration.

What does this bill do?

The bill will "extend the cashless debit card trial in three sites, and the income management program in Cape York, to 30 June 2020."

11th Sep 2018, 2:02 PM – Senate Social Services Legislation Amendment (Cashless Debit Card Trial Expansion) Bill 2018 - Third Reading - Pass the bill - Division No. 2

Supporters vote “Yes (strong)”

Party Yes No
Australian Conservatives (100% turnout) 1
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 9
Australian Labor Party (80% turnout) 20
Centre Alliance (100% turnout) 2
Country Liberal Party (100% turnout) 1
Derryn Hinch's Justice Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy President (100% turnout) 1
Independent (150% turnout) 3
Katter's Australian Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal Democratic Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (100% turnout) 2
Liberal Party (78% turnout) 18
National Party (67% turnout) 2
Pauline Hanson's One Nation Party (100% turnout) 2
President (100% turnout) 1
United Australia Party (0.0% turnout)
Totals (86% turnout) 33 32

The majority voted in favour of passing this bill in the Senate, with amendments. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to read the bill for a third time. The bill will now be sent back to the House of Representatives so that our MPs there can decide whether they agree with the amendments or not.

What does the bill do?

The bill was introduced to:

  • expand the cashless debit card arrangements to a further trial site, the Bundaberg and Hervey Bay area, to run until 30 June 2020;
  • specify the class of trial participants for the area and increase the total number of trial participants overall to 15 000;
  • provide for an exception from the restrictive trade practices provisions of the Competition and Consumer Act 2010 for merchants that implement product level blocking systems to identify that a cashless debit card is being used for payment and, if any restricted products are being purchased, decline the transaction; and
  • limit the use of the restricted portion of a payment to prevent the portion being used to obtain cash-like products which could be used to obtain alcohol or gambling.

23rd Aug 2018, 11:32 AM – Senate Social Services Legislation Amendment (Cashless Debit Card Trial Expansion) Bill 2018 - Second Reading - Agree with the bill's main idea - Division No. 2

Supporters vote “Yes (strong)”

Party Yes No
Australian Conservatives (100% turnout) 1
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 9
Australian Labor Party (72% turnout) 18
Centre Alliance (100% turnout) 2
Country Liberal Party (100% turnout) 1
Derryn Hinch's Justice Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy President (100% turnout) 1
Independent (150% turnout) 3
Katter's Australian Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal Democratic Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (50% turnout) 1
Liberal Party (70% turnout) 16
National Party (100% turnout) 3
Pauline Hanson's One Nation Party (150% turnout) 3
President (100% turnout) 1
United Australia Party (0.0% turnout)
Totals (82% turnout) 32 30

The majority voted in favour of the bill's main idea, which is to expand the trials for the cashless debit card to other places.

In parliamentary jargon, this vote was a vote to read the bill for a second time and, because it was successful, means that the Senate can now discuss the bill in more detail.

What is the bill's main idea?

The bill was introduced to:

  • expand the cashless debit card arrangements to a further trial site, the Bundaberg and Hervey Bay area, to run until 30 June 2020;
  • specify the class of trial participants for the area and increase the total number of trial participants overall to 15 000;
  • provide for an exception from the restrictive trade practices provisions of the Competition and Consumer Act 2010 for merchants that implement product level blocking systems to identify that a cashless debit card is being used for payment and, if any restricted products are being purchased, decline the transaction; and
  • limit the use of the restricted portion of a payment to prevent the portion being used to obtain cash-like products which could be used to obtain alcohol or gambling.

20th Aug 2018, 7:47 PM – Senate Regulations and Determinations - Social Security (Administration) (Trial of Cashless Welfare Arrangements) Determination 2018 - Disallow extension of trial - Division No. 5

Supporters vote “No”

Party Yes No
Australian Conservatives (100% turnout) 1
Australian Greens (89% turnout) 8
Australian Labor Party (76% turnout) 19
Centre Alliance (100% turnout) 2
Country Liberal Party (0.0% turnout)
Derryn Hinch's Justice Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy President (100% turnout) 1
Independent (150% turnout) 3
Katter's Australian Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal Democratic Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (50% turnout) 1
Liberal Party (74% turnout) 17
National Party (100% turnout) 3
Pauline Hanson's One Nation Party (150% turnout) 3
President (100% turnout) 1
United Australia Party (0.0% turnout)
Totals (82% turnout) 28 34

The majority voted against a motion introduced by NSW Senator Doug Cameron (Labor), which means it failed.

Senator Cameron explained his motion:

Today I move to disallow the provisions of this instrument which extend the trial of the cashless debit card to the Goldfields region of Western Australia. Labor's position on the cashless debit card has always been clear: we do not support a national rollout of the cashless debit card; we have never supported a national rollout of the cashless debit card.

Motion text

That sections 7 to 9 of the Social Security (Administration) (Trial of Cashless Welfare Arrangements) Determination 2018, made under the Social Security (Administration) Act 1999, be disallowed [F2018L00245].

20th Aug 2018, 6:19 PM – Senate Regulations and Determinations - Social Security (Administration) (Trial of Cashless Welfare Arrangements) Determination 2018 and another - Disallow - Division No. 4

Supporters vote “No”

Party Yes No
Australian Conservatives (100% turnout) 1
Australian Greens (89% turnout) 8
Australian Labor Party (52% turnout) 13
Centre Alliance (100% turnout) 2
Country Liberal Party (0.0% turnout)
Derryn Hinch's Justice Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy President (0.0% turnout)
Independent (100% turnout) 2
Katter's Australian Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal Democratic Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (0.0% turnout)
Liberal Party (61% turnout) 14
National Party (100% turnout) 3
Pauline Hanson's One Nation Party (150% turnout) 3
President (0.0% turnout)
United Australia Party (0.0% turnout)
Totals (64% turnout) 8 41

The majority voted against a motion to disallow the determinations listed below, which means they will remain unchanged and in force.

Motion text

That the following legislative instruments, made under the Social Security (Administration) Act 1999, be disallowed:

(a) the Social Security (Administration) (Trial of Cashless Welfare Arrangements) Determination 2018 [F2018L00245]; and

(b) the Social Security (Administration) (Trial—Declinable Transactions and Welfare Restricted Bank Account) Determination 2018 [F2018L00251].

21st Jun 2018, 12:33 PM – Representatives Social Services Legislation Amendment (Cashless Debit Card Trial Expansion) Bill 2018 - Second Reading - Agree with bill's main idea - Division No. 8

Supporters vote “Yes (strong)”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 1
Australian Labor Party (91% turnout) 59
Deputy Speaker (100% turnout) 1
Independent (100% turnout) 2
Katter's Australian Party (0.0% turnout)
Liberal Party (100% turnout) 59
National Party (93% turnout) 14
Nick Xenophon Team (0.0% turnout)
Speaker (100% turnout) 1
Totals (94% turnout) 75 62

The majority voted in favour of the bill's main idea, which is to expand the trials for the cashless debit card to other places.

In parliamentary jargon, this vote was a vote to read the bill for a second time and, because it was successful, means that the House can now discuss the bill in more detail.

What is the bill's main idea?

The bill was introduced to:

  • expand the cashless debit card arrangements to a further trial site, the Bundaberg and Hervey Bay area, to run until 30 June 2020;
  • specify the class of trial participants for the area and increase the total number of trial participants overall to 15 000;
  • provide for an exception from the restrictive trade practices provisions of the Competition and Consumer Act 2010 for merchants that implement product level blocking systems to identify that a cashless debit card is being used for payment and, if any restricted products are being purchased, decline the transaction; and
  • limit the use of the restricted portion of a payment to prevent the portion being used to obtain cash-like products which could be used to obtain alcohol or gambling.

13th Feb 2018, 4:32 PM – Representatives Social Services Legislation Amendment (Cashless Debit Card) Bill 2017 - Consideration of Senate Message - Agree with the amendment to pass the bill - Division No. 2

Supporters vote “Yes”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 1
Australian Labor Party (99% turnout) 67
Deputy Speaker (100% turnout) 1
Independent (100% turnout) 1 1
Katter's Australian Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal Party (97% turnout) 57
National Party (100% turnout) 15
Nick Xenophon Team (100% turnout) 1
Speaker (0.0% turnout)
Totals (97% turnout) 76 69

The majority voted in favour of a motion "That the amendment be agreed to." This amendment was introduced by the Senate, who agreed to pass this bill only if the House agreed to it. Since the House has agreed, the bill will now become law.

What was the amendment?

The amendment was introduced by NSW Senator Concetta Fierravanti-Wells (Liberal Party) on behalf of the Government. She explained that:

The government amendment extends the trial of the cashless debit card to 30 June 2019. The amendments also specify that the trial will be limited to three sites—namely, the East Kimberley and the included communities, Ceduna and the surrounding regions, and the Goldfields. The bill retains the existing legislated limitations on trial parameters in relation to the number of sites, participant numbers and the duration of the cashless debit card trial.

12th Feb 2018, 9:51 PM – Senate Social Services Legislation Amendment (Cashless Debit Card) Bill 2017 - Third Reading - Pass the bill - Division No. 5

Supporters vote “Yes (strong)”

Party Yes No
Australian Conservatives (100% turnout) 1
Australian Greens (89% turnout) 8
Australian Labor Party (67% turnout) 16
Country Liberal Party (0.0% turnout)
Derryn Hinch's Justice Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy President (100% turnout) 1
Independent (150% turnout) 2 1
Liberal Democratic Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (100% turnout) 2
Liberal Party (70% turnout) 16
National Party (67% turnout) 2
Nick Xenophon Team (100% turnout) 2
Pauline Hanson's One Nation Party (67% turnout) 2
President (100% turnout) 1
Totals (76% turnout) 30 26

The majority voted in favour of passing the bill as amended in the Senate. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to read the bill for a third time.

The bill will now return to the House where our Members of Parliament (MPs) will decide whether they agree with the Senate's amendments.

What does the bill do?

The bill was introduced to:

remove certain restrictions on the cashless debit card trial and thereby allow the extension of trial arrangements in current sites and to further sites.

Read more about this trial in the bills digest.

12th Feb 2018, 1:51 PM – Senate Social Services Legislation Amendment (Cashless Debit Card) Bill 2017 - Second Reading - Agree with the bill's main idea - Division No. 1

Supporters vote “Yes (strong)”

Party Yes No
Australian Conservatives (100% turnout) 1
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 9
Australian Labor Party (83% turnout) 20
Country Liberal Party (100% turnout) 1
Derryn Hinch's Justice Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy President (0.0% turnout)
Independent (150% turnout) 3
Liberal Democratic Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (100% turnout) 2
Liberal Party (78% turnout) 18
National Party (100% turnout) 3
Nick Xenophon Team (100% turnout) 2
Pauline Hanson's One Nation Party (67% turnout) 2
President (100% turnout) 1
Totals (86% turnout) 35 29

The majority voted in favour of the main idea of the bill, which means that the Senate can now discuss it in more detail. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to read the bill for a second time.

Main idea of the bill

The bill was introduced to:

remove certain restrictions on the cashless debit card trial and thereby allow the extension of trial arrangements in current sites and to further sites.

Read more about this trial in the bills digest.

6th Feb 2018, 6:05 PM – Representatives Social Services Legislation Amendment (Cashless Debit Card) Bill 2017 - Second Reading - Agree with the bill's main idea - Division No. 1

Supporters vote “Yes (strong)”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 1
Australian Labor Party (99% turnout) 67
Deputy Speaker (100% turnout) 1
Independent (100% turnout) 2
Katter's Australian Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal Party (100% turnout) 59
National Party (100% turnout) 15
Nick Xenophon Team (100% turnout) 1
Speaker (0.0% turnout)
Totals (99% turnout) 76 71

The majority voted in favour of the main idea of the bill, which means that the House can now discuss it in more detail. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to read the bill for a second time.

Main idea of the bill

The bill was introduced to:

remove certain restrictions on the cashless debit card trial and thereby allow the extension of trial arrangements in current sites and to further sites.

Read more about this trial in the bills digest.

19th Jun 2017, 3:59 PM – Senate Motions - Cashless Welfare Card Trial Sites - Do not expand - Division No. 6

Supporters vote “No (strong)”

Party Yes No
Australian Conservatives (100% turnout) 1
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 9
Australian Labor Party (48% turnout) 12
Country Liberal Party (100% turnout) 1
Derryn Hinch's Justice Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy President (0.0% turnout)
Independent (50% turnout) 1
Liberal Democratic Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (100% turnout) 2
Liberal Party (62% turnout) 13
National Party (75% turnout) 3
Nick Xenophon Team (67% turnout) 2
Pauline Hanson's One Nation Party (100% turnout) 4
President (0.0% turnout)
Totals (66% turnout) 9 41

The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Rachel Siewert (WA), which means it was unsuccessful. The motion called for the Government to abandon planned cashless welfare card trials and stop further expansion of the card at current sites.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) two extra trial sites of the cashless welfare card were funded in the 2017-18 Budget,

(ii) the locations being considered to date for these additional trial sites are Port Hedland, East Pilbara, Kalgoorlie, Laverton, Leonora, Broome, Redlands, Bundaberg, Fraser Coast and somewhere in Tasmania, and

(iii) the Government has claimed to be consulting with the community in these areas but has not consulted with those who will be directly affected by the card;

(b) acknowledges that evaluations of the NT Intervention, including compulsory income management, show it met none of its objectives; and

(c) calls on the Government to abandon the additional two trial sites and halt further expansion of the current cashless welfare card sites.

14th Sep 2016, 6:49 PM – Senate Regulations and Determinations - Social Security (Administration) (Trial Area — East Kimberley) Determination 2016 - Disallow - Division No. 3

Supporters vote “No”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 9
Australian Labor Party (46% turnout) 12
Country Liberal Party (100% turnout) 1
Derryn Hinch's Justice Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy President (0.0% turnout)
Family First Party (0.0% turnout)
Independent (200% turnout) 2
Liberal Democratic Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (50% turnout) 1
Liberal Party (45% turnout) 10
National Party (75% turnout) 3
Nick Xenophon Team (67% turnout) 2
Pauline Hanson's One Nation Party (25% turnout) 1
President (0.0% turnout)
Totals (57% turnout) 9 34

The majority voted against a motion to disallow the Social Security (Administration) (Trial Area—East Kimberley) Determination 2016, which means it was unsuccessful and the Determination will remain law. The motion was introduced by Greens Senator Rachel Siewert.

What does this mean?

Senator Siewert proposed to stop the Determination from having legal force, so that it was no longer law.

The explanatory statement explains that the Determination introduced a debit card trial that:

will test the concept of cashless welfare arrangements by disbursing particular welfare payments to a welfare restricted bank account, accessed by a debit card which does not allow cash withdrawals.

Motion text

That the Senate disallow the Social Security (Administration) (Trial Area—East Kimberley) Determination 2016.

23rd Feb 2016, 6:36 PM – Senate Regulations and Determinations — Social Security (Administration) (Trial Area – Ceduna and Surrounding Region) Determination 2015; Disallowance - Division No. 4

Supporters vote “No”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 10
Australian Labor Party (50% turnout) 12
Australian Motoring Enthusiast Party (100% turnout) 1
Country Liberal Party (0.0% turnout)
Deputy President (100% turnout) 1
Family First Party (0.0% turnout)
Independent (67% turnout) 2
Liberal Democratic Party (0.0% turnout)
Liberal National Party (50% turnout) 1
Liberal Party (32% turnout) 8
National Party (75% turnout) 3
Nick Xenophon Team (0.0% turnout)
Palmer United Party (100% turnout) 1
President (0.0% turnout)
Totals (51% turnout) 11 28

The majority of the Senate voted not to overturn the regulations made for the Act which created the welfare debit card trial. This means that the welfare debit card trial will continue as planned.

In parliamentary jargon, the majority voted against a disallowance of the Social Security (Administration) (Trial Area – Ceduna and Surrounding Region) Determination 2015. A disallowance is where either house of Parliament can veto delegated legislation (which is legislation created by the executive, not by Parliament).

14th Oct 2015, 6:02 PM – Senate Bills — Social Security Legislation Amendment (Debit Card Trial) Bill 2015; Third Reading - Division No. 4

Supporters vote “Yes”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (90% turnout) 9
Australian Labor Party (58% turnout) 14
Australian Motoring Enthusiast Party (100% turnout) 1
Country Liberal Party (0.0% turnout)
Deputy President (100% turnout) 1
Family First Party (100% turnout) 1
Independent (130% turnout) 4
Liberal Democratic Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (50% turnout) 1
Liberal Party (44% turnout) 11
National Party (75% turnout) 3
Nick Xenophon Team (0.0% turnout)
Palmer United Party (100% turnout) 1
President (0.0% turnout)
Totals (62% turnout) 37 10

The majority voted in favour of passing the bill in the Senate. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to read it for a third time.

What does this bill do?

People receiving working-age welfare payments in certain areas would have 80% of their payments placed onto a debit card and 20% of their payments paid in cash. The debit card would not allow cash withdrawal or spending on gambling or alcohol.

For more details, see this article from the ABC.

14th Oct 2015, 10:08 AM – Senate Bills — Social Security Legislation Amendment (Debit Card Trial) Bill 2015; Second Reading - Division No. 1

Supporters vote “Yes”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 10
Australian Labor Party (58% turnout) 14
Australian Motoring Enthusiast Party (100% turnout) 1
Country Liberal Party (0.0% turnout)
Deputy President (100% turnout) 1
Family First Party (100% turnout) 1
Independent (130% turnout) 4
Liberal Democratic Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (100% turnout) 2
Liberal Party (48% turnout) 12
National Party (25% turnout) 1
Nick Xenophon Team (0.0% turnout)
Palmer United Party (100% turnout) 1
President (0.0% turnout)
Totals (63% turnout) 38 10

The majority voted to read the bill a second time in the Senate.

This means that the majority of members accepted the main idea of the bill, so it will be considered further.

What does this bill do?

People receiving working-age welfare payments in certain areas would have 80% of their payments placed onto a debit card and 20% of their payments paid in cash. The debit card would not allow cash withdrawal or spending on gambling or alcohol.

For more details, see this article from the ABC.