How Andrew Murray voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should increase financial support for childcare and early childhood eduction by, for example, supporting increased wages for workers and providing grants for not-for-profit community child care initiatives

Division Andrew Murray Supporters vote Division outcome

13th Sep 2006, 3:44 PM – Senate Motions - Child Care - Increase wages for workers

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The majority voted against a motion that called for the Government "to address the wages paid to child care workers before supplementing the salary advantages paid to politicians". The motion was introduced by Greens Senator Bob Brown.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes, with concern:

(i) that child care workers remain among the lowest paid Australians, earning as little as $541 per week,

(ii) that women working in child care are likely to accumulate some of the lowest levels of superannuation in Australia,

(iii) that a politician who entered parliament at the 2004 election, aged 30, and who retires at 65 would have received a superannuation lump sum of $670 211 but would now receive a lump sum of $1 117 000 under the new 15 per cent contribution regime, and

(iv) the statement by the Prime Minister (Mr Howard) that low wages adversely affect the gene pool of those drawn to particular occupations; and

(b) calls on the Government to address the wages paid to child care workers before supplementing the salary advantages paid to politicians.

absent Yes Not passed by a large majority

How "never voted" is worked out

Normally a person's votes count towards a score which is used to work out a simple phrase to summarise their position on a policy. However in this case Andrew Murray was absent during all divisions for this policy. So, it's impossible to say anything concrete other than that they have "never voted" on this policy.