How Jane Hume voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should increase the Youth Allowance rate to ensure that it covers basic living costs

Division Jane Hume Supporters vote Division outcome

18th Mar 2021, 3:05 PM – Senate Social Services Legislation Amendment (Strengthening Income Support) Bill 2021 - Second Reading - Greens amendments (raise youth allowance etc)

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The majority voted against amendments introduced by the Australian Greens, which means they failed. See this explanation for an overview of what each amendment did. A key purpose of the amendments was to raise the rate of certain welfare payments, including youth allowance and jobseeker.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

10th Dec 2020, 4:41 PM – Senate Social Services and Other Legislation Amendment (Extension of Coronavirus Support) Bill 2020 - Second Reading - Increase Jobseeker Payment and Youth Allowance

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The majority voted against an amendment to the usual second reading motion "that the bill be read a second time" - parliamentary jargon for agreeing with the main idea of the bill.

Amendment text

At the end of the motion, add: ", but the Senate:

(a) notes that the measures in this Bill will cut the coronavirus supplement from $250 a fortnight to $150 a fortnight, and throw an additional 330,000 people into poverty, which means the Government will have forced a total of 1.16 million Australians below the poverty line since September 2020; and

(b) calls on the Government to immediately announce a permanent and ongoing increase to the Jobseeker Payment and Youth Allowance so that unemployed and underemployed Australians can live above the poverty line".

absent Yes Not passed by a small majority

9th Dec 2020, 4:27 PM – Senate Motions - Coronavirus Supplement - Increaserate of Jobseeker and Youth Allowance

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The same number of senators voted for and against the motion, which means it was unsuccessful.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) the Government has failed to provide certainty to millions of Australians without work about the future rate of the JobSeeker Payment and Youth Allowance,

(ii) treating income support payments like a political football by making ad hoc and last minute announcements to changes in payment rates is unfair, impacting people's mental health and ability to plan for their futures, and

(iii) with the Government's reduction to the Coronavirus Supplement to $150 a fortnight between January and March, those on the Jobseeker Payment and Youth Allowance, including the children who are living with parents who receive the Coronavirus Supplement will be living below the poverty line during the holiday period; and

(b) calls on the Government to permanently increase the rate of Jobseeker and Youth Allowance as part of the Mid-Year Economic and Fiscal Outlook to ensure that people on these payments are not living in poverty.

No Yes Not passed

11th Nov 2020, 4:06 PM – Senate Motions - Coronavirus Supplement - Increase JobSeeker Payment and Youth Allowance

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by West Australian Senator Rachel Siewert (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) condemns the Government's announcement that it is cutting the Coronavirus Supplement to $150 a fortnight between January and March 2021 which will see people on the JobSeeker Payment and Youth Allowance drop further below the poverty line;

(b) notes that this Government is treating income support payments like a political football by making ad-hoc and last minute announcements to changes in payment rates, which is in stark comparison to the certainty provided to those on JobKeeper Payment; and

(c) calls on the Government to immediately announce a permanent and ongoing increase to the JobSeeker Payment and Youth Allowance that ensures no one receiving these payments falls below the poverty line.

No Yes Not passed by a small majority

11th Nov 2020, 11:50 AM – Senate Social Services and Other Legislation Amendment (Coronavirus and Other Measures) Bill 2020 - Second Reading - Increase support

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The majority voted against an amendment to the usual second reading motion, which is "that the bill be read a second time" - parliamentary jargon for agreeing with the main idea of the bill. Had the amendment been successful, it would have added the words below to the original motion.

Amendment text

At the end of the motion, add: ", but the Senate:

(a) notes that:

(i) this Bill and the 2020-21 Budget fails people on JobSeeker Payment;

(ii) the 2.3 million Australians receiving the coronavirus supplement are still in the dark about the future of the supplement beyond December 2020; and

(iii) the coronavirus crisis isn't over and unemployed and underemployed Australians will continue to need support during 2021; and

(b) calls on the Government to:

(i) announce its plans regarding the future of the coronavirus supplement beyond December 2020 immediately for at least the current level of $250 a fortnight and to ensure it doesn't fall any further below the poverty line; and

(ii) announce a permanent and ongoing increase to JobSeeker Payment and Youth Allowance so that the base rate of these payments is above the poverty line".

No Yes Not passed by a small majority

24th Jul 2019, 3:55 PM – Senate Motions - Newstart Allowance, Youth Allowance - Increase

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The majority voted in favour of a motion introduced by WA Senator Rachel Siewert (Greens), which means it passed. Motions like these don't make any legal changes on their own but are politically influential because they represent the will of the Senate.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes:

(i) that the rate of Newstart for single people without children is $555.70 per fortnight,

(ii) that the Federal Government has taken action to address deeming rates acknowledging that part-pensioners were struggling,

(iii) that the Salvation Army's 2018 Economic and Social Impact Survey found that after paying for accommodation, Newstart recipients were left with $17 a day,

(iv) the findings of an analysis by the Australian National University's Professor Peter Whiteford, that Newstart is the second lowest unemployment payment in the OECD if we look at the replacement rate, and

(v) that the Anglicare Rental Affordability Snapshot 2019 found there were zero affordable rentals for a single person on Newstart or Youth Allowance in any major Australian city; and

(b) urges the Federal Government to immediately increase the single rate of Newstart and Youth Allowance.

No Yes Passed by a small majority

4th Jul 2019, 5:33 PM – Senate Treasury Laws Amendment (Tax Relief So Working Australians Keep More of Their Money) Bill 2019 - Second Reading - Government should increase Newstart & Youth Allowance

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by WA Senator Rachel Siewert (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

At the end of the motion, add:

", but the Senate:

(a) notes that the bill does nothing to assist people receiving newstart allowance or youth allowance; and

(b) calls upon the Government to introduce legislation to amend the Social Security Act 1991 to increase the maximum single rates of newstart allowance and youth allowance by $150 per fortnight".

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

4th Jul 2019, 12:31 PM – Senate Motions - Newstart and Youth Allowance - Raise by $75 a week

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by West Australian Senator Rachel Siewert (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) there are approximately 3 million people in Australia living in poverty, including over 700,000 children,

(ii) Australia has no poverty reduction plan and, despite economic growth, poverty levels have remained high,

(iii) Newstart and Youth Allowance have not had an increase in real terms for over 25 years,

(iv) recipients of these income support payments are unable to cover basic living costs such as housing, food, transport, healthcare and utilities,

(v) income inequality and poverty has significant negative effects on individuals' physical and mental wellbeing and society, and

(vi) poverty in early childhood can lead to poorer life outcomes; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to make it a priority to help address poverty in Australia by raising Newstart and Youth Allowance by $75 a week.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

12th Nov 2018, 4:57 PM – Senate Motions - Anti-Poverty Week - Increase Newstart & Youth Allowance

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The majority voted against part of a motion introduced by Greens Senator Rachel Siewert (WA), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

[...]

(c) calls on the Federal Government to increase Newstart and Youth Allowance by $75 a week.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

20th Jun 2018, 11:40 AM – Senate Treasury Laws Amendment (Personal Income Tax Plan) Bill 2018 - Second Reading - Raise minimum wage, Newstart and Youth Allowance

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Victorian Senator Richard Di Natale, which means it failed.

Motion text

At the end of the motion, add:

", but the Senate is of the opinion that:

(a) the bill should not be considered until the minimum wage is lifted to 60% of the median wage, and Newstart, Youth Allowance and related allowances are increased by $75 a week; and

(b) the revenue used to fund the government's Tax Cut Plan should be invested in health and education services, public infrastructure and the social safety net, instead of being used to fund tax cuts."

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

10th May 2018, 12:10 PM – Senate Motions - Pensions and Benefits - Increase single rate of Newstart and Youth Allowance

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by the Greens Senator Rachel Siewert (WA), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) recognises that single rates of unemployment payments are completely inadequate to cover basic living costs;

(b) acknowledges that our social safety net currently fails to protect jobseekers from falling into poverty;

(c) notes that:

(i) the Australian Council of Social Service has called for an increase of $75 a week to allowance payments for single people from 1 January 2019, and

(ii) the 2018-19 Budget did not increase any allowance payments, including Newstart or Youth Allowance; and

(d) urges the Federal Government to increase the single rate of Newstart and Youth Allowance by $75 a week.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

14th Aug 2017, 10:08 AM – Senate Social Security Amendment (Caring for People on Newstart) Bill 2017 - Second Reading - Agree with the bill's main idea

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The majority voted against a motion to agree with the bill's main idea. In parliamentary jargon, they voted against reading the bill for a second time. This means that the bill has been rejected and won't be considered any further.

What was the bill's main idea?

The bill was introduced to increase the single rate of newstart and single independent rate of youth allowance by $110 a week.

No Yes (strong) Not passed by a modest majority

How "voted very strongly against" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 1 0 50
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 10 0 100
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 1 1 2
Total: 1 152

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 1 / 152 = 0.66%.

And then