How Tim Storer voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should put a large proportion of a person's welfare payment onto a debit card that cannot be used for alcohol or gambling and cannot be used to make cash withdrawals

Division Tim Storer Supporters vote Division outcome

3rd Apr 2019, 9:19 PM – Senate Social Security (Administration) Amendment (Income Management and Cashless Welfare) Bill 2019 - Third Reading - Pass the bill

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to agree with the remaining stages of this bill so that the bill can now be passed. In parliamentary jargon, they voted in read the bill for a third time. Since the Senate agreed to certain amendments to this bill, it will now return to the House of Representatives for their consideration.

What does this bill do?

The bill will "extend the cashless debit card trial in three sites, and the income management program in Cape York, to 30 June 2020."

No Yes (strong) Passed by a modest majority

11th Sep 2018, 2:02 PM – Senate Social Services Legislation Amendment (Cashless Debit Card Trial Expansion) Bill 2018 - Third Reading - Pass the bill

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The majority voted in favour of passing this bill in the Senate, with amendments. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to read the bill for a third time. The bill will now be sent back to the House of Representatives so that our MPs there can decide whether they agree with the amendments or not.

What does the bill do?

The bill was introduced to:

  • expand the cashless debit card arrangements to a further trial site, the Bundaberg and Hervey Bay area, to run until 30 June 2020;
  • specify the class of trial participants for the area and increase the total number of trial participants overall to 15 000;
  • provide for an exception from the restrictive trade practices provisions of the Competition and Consumer Act 2010 for merchants that implement product level blocking systems to identify that a cashless debit card is being used for payment and, if any restricted products are being purchased, decline the transaction; and
  • limit the use of the restricted portion of a payment to prevent the portion being used to obtain cash-like products which could be used to obtain alcohol or gambling.
Yes Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

23rd Aug 2018, 11:32 AM – Senate Social Services Legislation Amendment (Cashless Debit Card Trial Expansion) Bill 2018 - Second Reading - Agree with the bill's main idea

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The majority voted in favour of the bill's main idea, which is to expand the trials for the cashless debit card to other places.

In parliamentary jargon, this vote was a vote to read the bill for a second time and, because it was successful, means that the Senate can now discuss the bill in more detail.

What is the bill's main idea?

The bill was introduced to:

  • expand the cashless debit card arrangements to a further trial site, the Bundaberg and Hervey Bay area, to run until 30 June 2020;
  • specify the class of trial participants for the area and increase the total number of trial participants overall to 15 000;
  • provide for an exception from the restrictive trade practices provisions of the Competition and Consumer Act 2010 for merchants that implement product level blocking systems to identify that a cashless debit card is being used for payment and, if any restricted products are being purchased, decline the transaction; and
  • limit the use of the restricted portion of a payment to prevent the portion being used to obtain cash-like products which could be used to obtain alcohol or gambling.
Yes Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

20th Aug 2018, 7:47 PM – Senate Regulations and Determinations - Social Security (Administration) (Trial of Cashless Welfare Arrangements) Determination 2018 - Disallow extension of trial

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by NSW Senator Doug Cameron (Labor), which means it failed.

Senator Cameron explained his motion:

Today I move to disallow the provisions of this instrument which extend the trial of the cashless debit card to the Goldfields region of Western Australia. Labor's position on the cashless debit card has always been clear: we do not support a national rollout of the cashless debit card; we have never supported a national rollout of the cashless debit card.

Motion text

That sections 7 to 9 of the Social Security (Administration) (Trial of Cashless Welfare Arrangements) Determination 2018, made under the Social Security (Administration) Act 1999, be disallowed [F2018L00245].

No No Not passed by a small majority

20th Aug 2018, 6:19 PM – Senate Regulations and Determinations - Social Security (Administration) (Trial of Cashless Welfare Arrangements) Determination 2018 and another - Disallow

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The majority voted against a motion to disallow the determinations listed below, which means they will remain unchanged and in force.

Motion text

That the following legislative instruments, made under the Social Security (Administration) Act 1999, be disallowed:

(a) the Social Security (Administration) (Trial of Cashless Welfare Arrangements) Determination 2018 [F2018L00245]; and

(b) the Social Security (Administration) (Trial—Declinable Transactions and Welfare Restricted Bank Account) Determination 2018 [F2018L00251].

No No Not passed by a large majority

How "voted moderately for" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 2 100 100
MP voted against policy 1 0 50
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 2 20 20
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 0 0 0
Total: 120 170

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 120 / 170 = 71%.

And then