How Mary Fisher voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should increase investment in renewable energy technologies

Division Mary Fisher Supporters vote Division outcome

25th Jun 2012, 8:28 PM – Senate Clean Energy Finance Corporation Bill 2012 - Third Reading - Read a third time

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to read the bill for a third time.

Its purpose was to establish the Clean Energy Finance Corporation.

This means that the majority of senators agree that the bill should be passed in the Senate. Since the bill has already passed in the House of Representatives, the bill can now become law.

Background to the bill

The bill was introduced to establish the Clean Energy Finance Corporation as a body corporate and establish the Clean Energy Finance Corporation Special Account.(Learn more about the Clean Energy Finance Corporation on Radio National Breakfast. ) The development and managing of this account is referred at as the 'investment mandate'.(Read more about the investment mandate here. See also the Clean Energy Finance Corporation Investment Mandate Direction 2013 here.) Its purpose is to invest strategically in renewable energy, low emissions and energy efficiency projects and technologies in Australia.

References

absent Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

25th Jun 2012, 8:24 PM – Senate Clean Energy Finance Corporation Bill 2012 - Second Reading - Read a second time

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to read the bill for a second time.

This means that the majority of senators agree with the main idea of the bill, which was to establish the Clean Energy Finance Corporation.

Now the bill can be discussed in greater detail.

Background to the bill

The bill was introduced to establish the Clean Energy Finance Corporation as a body corporate and establish the Clean Energy Finance Corporation Special Account.(Learn more about the Clean Energy Finance Corporation on Radio National Breakfast. ) The development and managing of this account is referred at as the 'investment mandate'.(Read more about the investment mandate here. See also the Clean Energy Finance Corporation Investment Mandate Direction 2013 here.) Its purpose is to invest strategically in renewable energy, low emissions and energy efficiency projects and technologies in Australia.

References

absent Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

15th Mar 2012, 12:12 PM – Senate Motions - Coal - From coal to clean energy market

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Christine Milne, which means the motion was unsuccessful.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) China's twelfth 5 year plan is expected to introduce caps on coal use from 2015,

(ii) the price of coking coal has already dropped some 40 per cent in the past year, due in large part to a drop in China's demand for imported coal,

(iii) China expects utility scale solar power to out-compete new coal-fired power stations by the end of the decade, while the Indian Government expects the cost crossover as soon as 2016,

(iv) India's economic giant, Tata Power, has publicly stated that its new investments will favour renewable energy, as coal power is becoming 'impossible' to develop,

(v) the Australian Bureau of Resource and Energy Economics (BREE) continues to predict that coal exports will double over the next two decades, and

(vi) Australia is leaving itself economically exposed by focusing on the development of coal export infrastructure; and

(b) calls on the Government to:

(i) require BREE to review its modelling based on the current geopolitics of coal, and

(ii) rethink Australia's economic settings, which assume ongoing increases in the coal export market, and instead look to broaden Australia's economic base and build a more competitive clean energy economy.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

8th Feb 2012, 4:30 PM – Senate Motions - Wind Farms - Act on the Community Affairs References Committee's recommendations

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The majority voted in favour of an amendment introduced by Senator Simon Birmingham.

The original motion that Senator Birmingham wanted to amend was introduced by Senator John Madigan. It was:

"That the Senate—

(a) notes that on 23 June 2011 the Community Affairs References Committee tabled its final report,(Read the full report here (2.7 MB). Read the Government's response to the report's recommendations here (344 KB). More information about the health concerns related to wind farms is available here.) Social and economic impact of rural wind farms containing seven recommendations, including recommendations calling for studies on the effects of wind farms on human health; and

(b) calls on the Government to:

(i) immediately act on the committee's recommendations in the report, and

(ii) support a moratorium on the construction of further wind turbines until the recommendations have been satisfactorily addressed."

Senator Birmingham's amendment to this motion was:

"That the Senate—

Omit subparagraph (b)(ii), so that paragraph (b) now reads:

(b) calls on the Government to immediately act on the committee's recommendations in the report."

References

Yes Yes Passed by a small majority

22nd Jun 2010, 4:00 PM – Senate Motions - Transition to Renewable Energy - Undertake a study

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Christine Milne. This means that it was rejected. The motion was:

That the Senate-

(a) notes that the Zero Carbon Australia Stationary Energy Plan Zero Carbon Australia Stationary Energy Plan released by Beyond Zero Emissions and the University of Melbourne shows:

(i) that it is technically possible for Australia to achieve 100 per cent renewable energy within a decade, and

(ii) that the technologies to achieve this goal, including baseload solar thermal energy with storage, are commercially available today;(Read more about thermal energy storage here.)

(b) applauds the organisations involved for their vision and efforts; and

(c) calls on the Australian Government to direct the Department of Resources, Energy and Tourism and the Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency to undertake a similar study to examine the potential for a swift transition to 100 per cent renewable energy in Australia.

References

absent Yes Not passed by a large majority

10th Sep 2009, 9:46 AM – Senate Motions - Solar Flagship Program - Support program

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Christine Milne. This means that it was unsuccessful. The motion was:

That the Senate—

(a) notes:

(i) that United States of America company, First Solar, has signed a memorandum of understanding to build a 2GW solar power station in China and that this single plant will be eight times larger than projects called for by the Solar Flagship Program (the program), (ii) that the program depends for success on significant levels of private sector capital, (iii) that the global financial crisis is exacerbating difficulties Australian companies are experiencing in accessing private sector capital for innovative renewable technologies, (iv) that, in Australia, Solar Systems has gone into voluntary administration because of a lack of investment capital, and (v) the lack of a comprehensive or coherent policy framework to encourage private sector investment in renewable energy; and (b) calls on the Government to underpin the success of the program by: (i) providing loan guarantees for commercial-scale demonstration projects, (ii) implementing a gross national feed-in tariff for small to utility scale renewable energy projects, and (iii) planning and funding electricity grid extensions to connect remote utility scale projects.

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

14th Feb 2008, 10:32 AM – Senate Montions - Solar Energy Technology - Provide incentives

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Democrats Senator Lyn Allison. This means it was unsuccessful. The motion was:

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) in December 2007 Ausra Inc. announced that it will build a manufacturing plant in Nevada for solar thermal power systems, (ii) Ausra’s innovations in mirror systems have brought the price of solar power down to the level of gas-fired power and is expected soon to be price competitive with coal-fired power, and (iii) the plant will produce 700 MW a year in solar thermal power systems for the American Southwest;

(b) congratulates the founder of Ausra, world-renowned, Dr David Mills, for this development and for his longstanding solar technology innovation at the University of Sydney, including:

(i) the evacuated tube solar water heater technology that is now in use in 60 per cent of these units worldwide, (ii) the Compact Linear Fresnel Reflector for use in solar thermal energy, (iii) photovoltaic systems, and (iv) a solar steriliser design which won a World Health Organization award in 2002;

(c) regrets that the economic benefits of this important innovation in renewable, clean, base load power have been lost to Australia; and (d) urges the Government to:

(i) recognise that Australia, like Nevada and California, has excellent sources of solar energy from which to generate solar thermal base load power, and (ii) provide the necessary incentives for the technology to also be established in Australia.

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

7th Aug 2007, 3:53 PM – Senate Motions - Desalination Plant - Renewable energy

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Australian Democrats Senator Lyn Allison, which means it was unsuccessful. The motion was:

That the Senate:

(a) notes:

(i) the announcement by the Victorian State Government that a desalination plant costing $3.1 billion will be built near Wonthaggi to provide a third of Melbourne’s demand for water, approximately 150 billion litres, by 2012,(Read more about this proposed desalination plant on Wikipedia here.) (ii) that the desalination plant and associated pumping of more than 200 km will likely emit more than a million tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions a year and increase electricity use in Victoria by 2 per cent, (iii) that the Victorian Government intends to ‘offset’ greenhouse emissions through the purchase of renewable energy, (iv) that the ongoing drought in Victoria is highly likely to be related to climate change, (v) that 95 per cent of Victoria’s electricity is from ageing, low efficiency, brown coal-fired generators, (vi) that $3.1 billion could fund rebates for approximately 2 million household water tanks that could provide 80 billion litres of water for cistern, laundry and garden use, and (vii) that coal-fired power generation in Victoria uses approximately 400 billion litres of water a year;

(b) urges the Victorian State Government to develop desalination only if necessary after:

(i) stringent standards are implemented for water appliances, (ii) substantial quantities of potable water have been displaced by stormwater or other harvested water, (iii) water reticulation infrastructure leaks have been fixed, (iv) water intensive industry and commercial operations are water efficient, (v) all Victorians have low flow shower heads, dual flush cisterns and grey water systems, and (vi) there is widespread application of water sensitive urban design; and

(c) encourages the Victorian State Government to ensure that any desalination still required, uses only renewable-powered technology.

References

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

How "voted a mixture of for and against" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
MP absent 2 50 100
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 1 10 10
MP voted against policy 4 0 40
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 1 1 2
Total: 61 152

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 61 / 152 = 40%.

And then