How Nita Green voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should create a national integrity commission similar to the NSW Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) to detect, investigate and prevent corruption across all Commonwealth departments and agencies

Division Nita Green Supporters vote Division outcome

15th Jun 2020, 4:21 PM – Senate Motions - National Integrity Commission Bill 2018 (No. 2) - Seek House consent to deal with bill this month

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The majority voted in favour of a motion introduced by Queensland Senator Larissa Waters (Greens), which means it was successful

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) the Senate passed the Australian Greens' National Integrity Commission Bill 2018 (No. 2) on 9 September 2019 to establish a federal corruption watchdog with broad remit to investigate allegations of corruption and misconduct, and to ensure strong, independent oversight of the actions of parliamentarians,

(ii) the National Integrity Commission Bill 2018 (No. 2) was sent to the House of Representatives for debate on 10 September 2019, but has yet to be debated,

(iii) on 10 February 2020, the Senate resolved to call on the House to vote on the National Integrity Commission Bill 2018 (No. 2),

(iv) the Government ignored this call and has prevented all attempts to debate and vote on the National Integrity Commission Bill 2018 (No. 2) in the House,

(v) public consultation on the Commonwealth Integrity Commission model proposed by the Government ended nearly eighteen months ago, but the Government has yet to introduce legislation to establish an integrity commission,

(vi) in May 2020, the Attorney-General said that legislation to establish a Commonwealth Integrity Commission would be further delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, despite an exposure draft being "ready for release", and

(vii) polls consistently show that the majority of Australians support the establishment of a strong national integrity body;

(b) calls on the Federal Government to bring on the National Integrity Commission Bill 2018 (No. 2) in the House of Representatives for a vote in the June 2020 sittings; and

(c) transmits this resolution to the House of Representatives for concurrence.

Yes Yes Passed by a small majority

11th Feb 2020, 4:24 PM – Senate Motions - Commonwealth Integrity Commission - Matter of priority

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The majority voted in favour of a motion introduced by NT Senator Malarndirri McCarthy (Labor), which means it passed. Motions like these don't make any legal changes on their own but are politically influential because they represent the will of the Senate.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes:

(i) that the Morrison Government committed to implement a Commonwealth Integrity Commission (CIC) on 13 December 2018,

(ii) that it has been 424 days since that commitment and the Morrison Government has still failed to introduce legislation to establish the body, and

(iii) reports that the Member for Wide Bay, Mr Llew O'Brien, has called for the proposed federal anti-corruption body to be given "more strenuous, stronger" powers;

(b) calls on the Attorney-General, Mr Porter, to revise his proposed anti- corruption commission to give it the powers, independence and transparency it needs to effectively combat corruption in the federal sphere; and

(c) calls on the Federal Government to introduce legislation on the CIC as a matter of priority.

Yes Yes Passed by a small majority

10th Feb 2020, 7:58 PM – Senate Motions - National Integrity Commission Bill 2018 (No. 2) - Send to House of Representatives

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The majority voted in favour of a motion introduced by Queensland Senator Larissa Waters (Greens), which means it was successful.

Motion text

(1) That the Senate notes that:

(a) the Senate passed the Australian Greens' National Integrity Commission Bill 2018 (No. 2) on 9 September 2019 to establish a federal corruption watchdog with broad remit to investigate allegations of corruption and misconduct, and to ensure strong, independent oversight of the actions of parliamentarians; and

(b) public consultation on the Commonwealth Integrity Commission model proposed by the Government ended more than one year ago, but the Government has yet to introduce legislation to establish an integrity commission,

(2) That the Senate calls on the Federal Government to bring on the Australian Greens' National Integrity Commission Bill 2018 (No. 2) in the House of Representatives for a vote in the February 2020 sittings.

(3) That this resolution be sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence.

absent Yes Passed by a small majority

9th Sep 2019, 11:50 AM – Senate National Integrity Commission Bill 2018 (No. 2) - Third Reading - Pass the bill

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to pass the bill. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to read the bill for a third time. This means that the bill will now be sent to the House for their consideration.

What is the bill's main idea?

The bill was introduced in order to establish an independent public sector anti-corruption commission for the Commonwealth, to be known as the Australian National Integrity Commission.

Yes Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

9th Sep 2019, 11:41 AM – Senate National Integrity Commission Bill 2018 (No. 2) - Second Reading - Agree with bill's main idea

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to agree with the bill's main idea. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to read the bill for a second time.

What is the bill's main idea?

The bill was introduced in order to establish an independent public sector anti-corruption commission for the Commonwealth, to be known as the Australian National Integrity Commission.

Yes Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

How "voted very strongly for" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 2 100 100
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 2 20 20
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 1 1 2
Total: 121 122

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 121 / 122 = 99%.

And then