How Larissa Waters voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should put a ban on new thermal coal mines opening in Australia

Division Larissa Waters Supporters vote Division outcome

23rd Jun 2021, 4:39 PM – Senate Documents - Queensland: Coal Mining - Acland mine extension

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The majority voted in favour of a motion introduced by Tasmanian Senator Jonathon Duniam (Liberal), which means it succeeded. It does not have any legal force in itself, but can be politically influential because it represent the will of the Senate.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes:

(i) coal mining at Acland has been a big employer for 92 years and helped support the town of Oakey over that time,

(ii) the Acland mine has been seeking approval to extend the mine and guarantee work for 500 coal miners for 14 years,

(iii) while the mine has received all of its federal and state government environmental approvals, these are set aside due to court processes and Queensland Government delays,

(iv) if stage 3 of the mine proceeds the mine would provide secure employment for 481 full time employees,

(v) the Queensland state government is refusing to issue a mining lease or water licence for the Acland mine extension until court cases are resolved, a test they have not applied for other coal mines in Queensland,

(vi) already more than 200 coal miners have lost their jobs thanks to Queensland Government delays, and more face the sack at the end of July as the mine is forced into care and maintenance, and

(vii) businesses in Oakey are struggling because of the reduced economic activity at the mine; and

(b) calls on the Queensland Government to issue the mining lease and water licence, consistent with precedent, to save jobs and protect the future of the town of Oakey.

No No Passed by a small majority

18th Mar 2021, 4:59 PM – Senate Motions - New South Wales: Coal Industry - Acknowledge importance

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The majority voted in favour of a motion introduced by Queensland Senator Matthew Canavan (LNP), which means it passed. Motions like this don't make any legal changes on their own but are influential because they represent the will of the Senate.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes:

(i) the New South Wales (NSW) coal industry has coexisted with the Hunter Valley community for over 200 years, supporting the local community and providing the essential ingredients for cheap, reliable power, strong domestic manufacturing, and a thriving energy export industry,

(ii) many mines have commenced and closed during this time, with companies rehabilitating the land to a productive state for agricultural and native ecosystems, and

(iii) mining and agriculture can coexist, with land use trials noting the benefits for cattle grazing on rehabilitated land compared with existing pasture; and

(b) acknowledges the importance of the NSW coal industry for ensuring the reliability of the national energy market and providing reliable energy for domestic manufacturing.

No No Passed by a modest majority

2nd Feb 2021, 4:10 PM – Senate Motions - Coal-Fired Power Stations - Build in the Hunter

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Queensland Senator Malcolm Roberts (One Nation Party), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes the Hunter Valley has the best thermal coal in the world; and

(b) calls on the Morrison Government to build a coal fired power station in the Hunter.

No No Not passed by a large majority

11th Feb 2020, 4:07 PM – Senate Motions - Energy - Coal-fired power project

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The same number of senators voted for and against a motion introduced by Queensland Senator Pauline Hanson (One Nation), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that building new high-efficiency low-emission coal fired power stations will create jobs, lower power prices, increase competition and increase reliability in the energy system; and

(b) supports projects, like the Collinsville clean coal-fired power project, which will provide stable reliable baseload power and help lower power prices.

No No Not passed

10th Feb 2020, 7:37 PM – Senate Motions - Mining - Revoke Adani environmental approvals

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Queensland Senator Larissa Waters (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) Adani Mining has received a criminal conviction in relation to giving false and misleading information to the regulator in relation to unlawful clearing activities, and

(ii) criminal convictions are a trigger under section 145 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 for review and revocation of approvals granted under that Act; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to revoke Adani's environmental approvals related to its Carmichael Coal mine.

Yes Yes Not passed by a large majority

11th Nov 2019, 4:05 PM – Senate Motions - Wallarah 2 Coal Project - Cancel approval

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by NSW Senator Mehreen Faruqi (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) the Wallarah 2 Coal Project is a proposed longwall underground mining operation northwest of central Wyong on the New South Wales Central Coast,

(ii) the proposed mine would produce 4 to 5 million tonnes per annum of thermal coal each year for 28 years, leading to more than 264 million tonnes of CO2 being released into the atmosphere, and

(iii) the Wallarah 2 Coal Project poses a serious risk to the Central Coast's drinking water supply; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to protect the water of Central Coast communities, and cancel all environmental approvals granted under Federal law.

Yes Yes Not passed by a modest majority

17th Oct 2019, 12:48 PM – Senate Motions - Thermal Coal - Ban new mines

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Tasmanian Senator Peter Whish-Wilson (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate agrees that, given we are in a climate emergency, no new thermal coal mines should be opened.

Yes Yes (strong) Not passed by a large majority

16th Oct 2019, 4:40 PM – Senate Motions - Climate Change, Petroleum Industry - No new coal, oil or gas projects

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by West Australian Senator Rachel Siewert (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) acknowledges that the very first step in dealing with the climate crisis is that no new coal, oil or gas projects can be built;

(b) notes the in-depth research by the International Energy Agency that global carbon budgets cannot afford a single new coal, oil or gas project to proceed in order to stay below 1 degrees of warming, as committed to under the Paris Agreement; and

(c) concludes that the Adani coalmine in Queensland, fracking the Beetaloo Gas Basin in the Northern Territory and drilling for oil in the Great Australian Bight are incompatible with any declaration of a climate emergency.

Yes Yes Not passed by a large majority

24th Jul 2019, 3:47 PM – Senate Motions - Great Barrier Reef - Protect from climate change

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Queensland Senator Larissa Waters (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) on 17 July 2019, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority released a Position Statement on Climate Change, which stated: 'climate change is the greatest threat to the Great Barrier Reef. Only the strongest and fastest possible actions to decrease global greenhouse gas emissions will reduce the risks and limit the impacts of climate change on the Reef'... 'If we are to secure a future for the Great Barrier Reef and coral reef ecosystems globally, there is an urgent and critical need to accelerate actions to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. This must happen in parallel to taking actions to build the Reef's resilience',

(ii) in an address to the British Parliament on 9 July 2019, Sir David Attenborough criticised Australia for not taking the risks of climate change seriously, and imperilling the Great Barrier Reef,

(iii) at its meeting in 2015, the UNESCO World Heritage Committee gave the Australian Government five years to address the state of the Great Barrier Reef before it re-considered whether to include it on the World Heritage In Danger list—the Australian Government is due to submit a report addressing the protection of the Reef's Outstanding Universal Value to avert an In Danger listing by 1 December 2019,

(iv) scientific reports confirm that approximately half of the shallow water coral of the Great Barrier Reef has been lost since 2016 due to successive coral bleaching incidents,

(v) the Association of Marine Park Tourism Operators has signed a Reef Climate Declaration that acknowledges climate change as "the single biggest threat to the Great Barrier Reef" and states that "Australia must join the rest of the world to rapidly phase out coal and other fossil fuels and transition to renewable energy",

(vi) the Great Barrier Reef supports approximately 64,000 jobs and generates $6 billion for the Australian economy annually,

(vii) the science and the economics are clear that these jobs are at risk if strong action is not taken immediately to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and limit global temperature rises to 1.5°C, and

(viii) fossil fuel companies have donated nearly $5 million to the Liberals, The Nationals and Labor parties over the past four years; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to:

(i) affirm the advice of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority that climate change is the greatest threat to the Great Barrier Reef,

(ii) direct Mr Warren Entsch, Special Envoy for the Great Barrier Reef, to prioritise actions that reduce greenhouse gas emissions,

(iii) implement a climate policy that accelerates actions to limit global warming to 1.5°C to protect the Great Barrier Reef,

(iv) take all action necessary to properly protect the Great Barrier Reef and avoid the UNESCO World Heritage Committee needing to place the Great Barrier Reef on the World Heritage In Danger list,

(v) revoke all federal approvals for the Adani Carmichael mine and not approve any new coal in Australia, and

(vi) develop a clear plan to move towards 100% clean energy, including a plan for a just transition for Australia's regional workforces affected by climate change so that regional economies can thrive and workers are protected, and ban corporate donations to political parties from the fossil fuel industry, an industry which financially benefits from this Government's lack of action on climate change.

Yes Yes Not passed by a modest majority

How "voted very strongly for" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 1 50 50
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 8 80 80
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 0 0 0
Total: 130 130

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 130 / 130 = 100%.

And then