How Chris Ketter voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should allow companies to mine coal seam (CSG), tight and shale gas

Division Chris Ketter Supporters vote Division outcome

12th Feb 2019 – Senate Motions - Great Australian Bight - End oil and gas drilling

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by SA Senator Sarah Hanson-Young (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) a six year survey of the Great Australian Bight (the Bight), conducted as part of a joint effort by the South Australian Research and Development Institute, CSIRO, the University of Adelaide, Flinders University and BP, has discovered more than 400 previously unknown species,

(ii) the Bight is one of the most biodiverse places on the planet,

(iii) BP and Equinor's own modelling of an oil spill in the Bight shows the scale of disaster that is possible, and

(iv) Equinor plans to commence drilling in the Bight as early as next year; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to suspend all current oil and gas exploration and drilling licences, and move to ban future oil and gas drilling in the Bight.

No No Not passed by a modest majority

29th Nov 2018, 12:39 PM – Senate Motions - Coal Seam Gas Mining - Condemn lifting WA fracking moratorium

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Jordon Steele-John (WA), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) on 27 November 2018, the West Australian Labor Government lifted a moratorium on hydraulic fracturing (known as fracking) in all but the Perth, Peel and South-West regions of the state, meaning the practice will now be allowed on existing petroleum titles,

(ii) existing petroleum titles cover 5.1 million hectares of Western Australia, a vast area almost the size of Tasmania, and threaten the ecologically-fragile Kimberley region, the Pilbara and Mid-West,

(iii) the final report of the Independent Scientific Panel Inquiry into Hydraulic Fracture Stimulation in Western Australia 2018, handed down on 26 November 2018, stated: "Western Australia is the only Australian jurisdiction that has experienced a significant increase in GHG emissions since 2000, largely due to the predominance of the State's extractive industries (particularly conventional gas) ...",

(iv) a recent report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warned that we have just 12 years to halt the worst impacts of climate change and keep global warming to a maximum of 1.5C, and

(v) on 27 November 2018, WA Greens MLC, Mr Robin Chapple, gave notice he would urgently introduce a bill to the Legislative Council to ban fracking in the wake of the WA Labor Government's decision to lift the moratorium; and

(b) condemns the West Australian Government for lifting the moratorium on fracking, and failing to acknowledge that development of this toxic industry will only further worsen the state's ability to mitigate and adapt to the damaging impacts of climate change.

No No Not passed by a modest majority

18th Oct 2018, 12:32 PM – Senate Motions - Underground Coal Gasification - Ban

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Sarah Hanson-Young (SA), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate:

(a) notes that:

(i) Leigh Creek Energy has produced its first syngas using underground coal gasification (UCG), and

(ii) UCG was banned in 2016 in Queensland after the Linc Energy disaster in Chinchilla, which was declared Queensland's worst environmental disaster;

(b) further notes that UCG has been responsible for incidents of poisoning the water table and contaminating soil and air, and has been linked to an increase in cancers, including lung and breast cancers; and

(c) calls on the Federal Government to urgently intervene and stop the Leigh Creek project from progressing any further and ban UCG across the country.

absent No (strong) Not passed by a modest majority

15th Nov 2017, 3:59 PM – Senate Motions - Coal Seam Gas Mining: Liverpool Plains - Moratorium

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The majority voted against a motion calling for:

the Government to protect agricultural groundwater systems by placing a moratorium on Commonwealth approval of proposed coal and coal seam gas mining projects on the Liverpool Plains, Namoi Valley and Gunnedah Basin.

This means the motion failed.

Full motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) sustainable food and fibre production on the Liverpool Plains requires an integrated and strategic approach to water reform,

(ii) the Liverpool Plains contains some of the most productive and fertile soil in Australia and farmers need certainty about water resources to assist their farming practices, and

(iii) the high degree of connectivity between groundwater systems throughout the Namoi Valley indicates that mining impacts on Liverpool Plains groundwater can extend well beyond one local site into surrounding agricultural systems; and

(b) calls on the Government to protect agricultural groundwater systems by placing a moratorium on Commonwealth approval of proposed coal and coal seam gas mining projects on the Liverpool Plains, Namoi Valley and Gunnedah Basin.

No No Not passed by a modest majority

22nd Feb 2016, 4:14 PM – Senate Motions - Coal Seam Gas - Narrabri coal seam gas project

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Lee Rhiannon, which means that it was unsuccessful.

Wording of the motion

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) the Federal Government has approved coal seam gas mining in the Pilliga Forest near Narrabri in New South Wales, with Santos planning to develop an 850-well field,

(ii) the Pilliga Push is an ongoing civil disobedience campaign against this mining led by the Gamilaraay and Gomeroi peoples, the Knitting Nannas and other grassroots action groups in New South Wales, and

(iii) the Narrabri coal seam gas project presents an unacceptable risk to the region's groundwater and the Great Artesian Basin; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to:

(i) condemn the New South Wales Police Force's use of pepper spray against the protesters, and

(ii) withdraw its approval of the Narrabri coal seam gas project.

No No Not passed by a modest majority

24th Nov 2015, 3:56 PM – Senate Motions - Coal Seam Gas - Landholders' right to say "no"

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Larissa Waters. The motion asked for the Senate to agree that landowners should have the right to say "no" to coal seam gas activity on their land.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes:

(i) the Victorian National Party’s announcement in early 2015 that they ‘support landowners having the right to say no to coal seam gas extraction activity on their land’,

(ii) comments by the Leader of the Nationals and Minister for Infrastructure and Regional Development, Mr Truss MP, that farmers should have the right to say yes or no to coal seam gas exploration and extraction on their property,

(iii) comments by:

(a) the Deputy Leader of the Nationals and Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources, Mr Joyce MP, and

(b) the Deputy Leader of the Nationals in the Senate and Minister for Rural Health, Senator Nash,

supporting a right for farmers to say no to coal seam gas activity on their land,

(iv) reports that:

(a) the Assistant Minister to the Deputy Prime Minister, Mr McCormack MP, and

(b) Mr Broad MP, and Senators McKenzie, Williams and Canavan,

support the right of farmers to say no to coal seam gas activity on their land; and

(b) agrees that landowners should have the right to say no to coal seam gas activity on their land.

No No Not passed by a modest majority

15th Oct 2015, 12:38 PM – Senate Motions - Coal Seam Gas - Ombudsman and audit

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Independent Senator Glenn Lazarus in relation to coal seam gas mining.

Wording of the motion

That the Senate—

(a) notes that the people of Queensland have no legal right to stop mining companies from entering their land to mine coal seam gas (CSG);

(b) further notes that rural and regional communities across Queensland are being devastated by the impact of CSG mining, including loss of underground water, contamination of underground and surface water, health impacts, mental health issues, reduced quality of life, reduced land values and other forms of stress, trauma and suffering;

(c) acknowledges that the impact of CSG mining and the behaviour of resource companies in harassing, bullying and intimidating landholders is splintering families, dividing communities and creating personal and financial hardship;

(d) understands that the people affected by CSG mining have no fair and equitable legal recourse to address their concerns given the significant power imbalance between those affected and the mining companies;

(e) calls on the Government to urgently consider the establishment of a Resources Ombudsman and a CSG Mining Commissioner to address the issues being experienced by the people of Queensland and elsewhere across the country affected by CSG mining; and

(f) urges the Government to consider undertaking an urgent audit of the human impacts of CSG mining, and to establish support services and other forms of assistance, including medical assistance, for those affected by CSG mining.

No No (strong) Not passed by a modest majority

26th Mar 2015, 12:44 PM – Senate Motions — Coal Seam Gas

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Senator Larissa Waters moved:

That the Senate—

(a) notes:

  • (i) the concern expressed by regional communities about the impacts on food security and water resources from coal seam gas, shale gas and tight gas, and

  • (ii) That the Federal Government has power to regulate the conduct of constitutional corporations, including corporations involved in coal seam gas, shale gas and tight gas mining; and

(b) agrees that:

  • (i) food security and water resources should be prioritised over coal seam gas, shale gas and tight gas mining, and

  • (ii) the Federal Government should use its constitutional powers to regulate the conduct of corporations undertaking coal seam gas, shale gas and tight gas mining.

Senator Fiona Nash made a reply statement:

I have consistently said that if there is going to be a negative impact on prime agricultural land then coal seam gas mining should not occur. The government opposes this motion. The government does not make policy on the run in response to Greens notices of motion in the Senate, and we will not dignify the Greens' cheap political stunt with our vote.

No No (strong) Not passed by a modest majority

19th Mar 2015, 11:28 AM – Senate Motions — Ban donations to political parties from mining and coal seam gas (CSG) companies

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Senator Lee Rhiannon moved:

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

  • (i) the New South Wales Labor Party recently received a political donation from coal seam gas company Santos Ltd,

  • (ii) the New South Wales Labor Party subsequent to taking the donation, returned $2 200 to Santos Ltd acknowledging this money would cause community doubt that Labor was committed to a coal seam gas free north coast,

  • (iii) in the recent New South Wales leaders' debate the Labor leader, Mr Luke Foley, failed to rule out coal seam gas development if Labor formed government with his statement that there is a role for gas in the state's energy future, and

  • (iv) the Federal Labor Party received more than $90 000 from Santos Ltd in the 2012 13 and 2013 14 financial years; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to:

  • (i) ban political donations from mining and coal seam gas companies, and

  • (ii) end coal seam gas and coal mining on agricultural land and associated water resources.

No No Not passed by a modest majority

5th Mar 2015 – Senate Motions — Coal Seam Gas

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Senator Larissa Waters moved the following motion:

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

  • (i) the Victorian National Party announced in February 2015 that they 'support landowners having the right to say no to coal seam gas extraction activity on their land',

  • (ii) the National, Liberal and Labor parties voted down the Greens' Landholders' Right to Refuse (Gas and Coal) Bill 2013 in March 2014, a bill which would have given landholders the right to say no to coal seam gas extraction activity on their land, and

(b) the Greens re-introduced the Landholders' Right to Refuse (Gas and Coal) Bill on 4 March 2015; and

(b) agrees that landowners anywhere in Australia should have the right to say no to coal seam gas extraction activity on their land.

No No (strong) Not passed by a small majority

3rd Mar 2015 – Senate Motions — Liverpool Plains

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Greens Senator for Queensland Larissa Waters moved that the Senate:

(a) notes that:

  • (i) the Liverpool Plains is one of the most important agricultural regions in Australia with rare and highly productive black soils, excellent water resources and a favourable local climate,

  • (ii) farming has occurred on the Liverpool Plains for generations and the agricultural productivity of the area is up to 40 per cent above the national average for all farming regions of Australia,

  • (iii) highly productive agricultural land, like that of the Liverpool Plains, is a finite resource,

  • (iv) the New South Wales Planning Assessment Commission has recently approved the development of Chinese state-owned company Shenhua's Watermark open-cut coal mine on the Liverpool Plains, which will extract 268 million tonnes of coal over 30 years, 3 kilometres from the town of Breeza,

  • (v) farmers in the region are angry and extremely concerned that if this coal mine goes ahead their soils and the highly interconnected groundwater aquifers they rely on will be irreversibly damaged,

  • (vi) the Northern Daily Leader reported on 4 July 2014 That the Minister for Agriculture (Mr Joyce) said, 'I think the idea of a coalmine on the Breeza Plains is an absurdity' and 'I think it's most likely that it's going to have a deleterious effect on the aquifers', and

  • (vii) the Australian Broadcasting Corporation reported on 9 September 2014 that the Minister for Agriculture said of the Liverpool Plains, 'I've always said from the start that I don't believe that it is the appropriate place for a coal mine'; and

(b) believes That the Liverpool Plains should be permanently off limits to coal mining and coal seam gas extraction.

No No Not passed by a modest majority

9th Jul 2014, 3:51 PM – Senate Motions - Coal Seam Gas - Right to say no

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The majority voted against a motion moved by Senator Penny Wright related to coal seam gas. The motion was:

That the Senate—

(a) notes the importance of protecting valuable agricultural, residential and conservation land from unconventional gas activities;

(b) supports the right of landholders and local residents to say 'no' to unconventional gas exploration and mining in their communities;

(c) recognises the concerns expressed by communities in the south east of South Australia over potential groundwater contamination from unconventional gas activities; and

(d) congratulates the South East Local Government Association in South Australia for standing up for their local communities and voting for a moratorium on unconventional gas.

No No Not passed by a modest majority

How "voted strongly for" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 3 150 150
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
MP absent 1 25 50
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 8 80 80
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 0 0 0
Total: 255 280

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 255 / 280 = 91%.

And then