How Rebekha Sharkie voted compared to someone who believes that the federal parliament should continue to sit during the coronavirus pandemic

Division Rebekha Sharkie Supporters vote Division outcome

12th May 2020, 4:18 PM – Representatives Business - Days and Hours of Meeting - New sitting calendar

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The majority voted in favour of leaving the original motion unchanged. In other words, they voted against the amendment introduced by Watson MP Tony Burke (Labor). Mr Burke's amendment related to creating a new sitting calendar as, currently, Parliament doesn't have another agreed sitting day until 11 August 2020.

Original motion text

That so much of the standing orders be suspended as would prevent the following from occurring:

(1) the House of Representatives to meet on Wednesday, 13 May 2020 and Thursday, 14 May 2020;

(2) the Federation Chamber not to meet today, and to meet on Wednesday, 13 May 2020 and Thursday, 14 May 2020;

(3) immediately following the resolution of this motion the Treasurer to make a ministerial statement, with the Shadow Treasurer to respond; and

*(4) any variation to this arrangement to be made only by a motion moved by a Minister with leave granted by the Manager of Opposition Business. *

Amendment text

That the following words be added after paragraph (4):

“(5) the first item of business on Wednesday, 13 May 2020, be the presentation of a revised program of sittings for 2020”.

absent No Passed by a small majority

23rd Mar 2020, 7:07 PM – Representatives Business - Days and Hours of Meeting - No sitting days until 11 August 2020

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The majority voted in favour of the new program of sittings for 2020 that was developed in response to the coronavirus pandemic. Under the new calendar, the federal parliament will not be sitting again until 11 August 2020.

Yes No (strong) Passed by a small majority

How "voted very strongly against" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 1 0 50
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 1 1 2
Total: 1 52

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 1 / 52 = 1.9%.

And then