How Judith Adams voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should introduce a carbon pricing mechanism

Division Judith Adams Supporters vote Division outcome

8th Nov 2011 – Senate Clean Energy Bill 2011 and related bills - Third Reading - Read a third time

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to read the bills for a third time.

This means that the bills are passed in the Senate and, as they have already passed in the House of Representatives, they will now be sent to the Governor-General for royal assent so they can become law.

The eighteen bills are a package to implement a carbon pricing mechanism, which is a key policy of the Labor Government.

The eighteen bills are:

Background to the bills

The carbon pricing mechanism is set to begin on 1 July 2012.(Read more about the carbon pricing mechanism on the Clean Energy Regulator’s website.) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It will apply to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon will be fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market.

References

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

8th Nov 2011 – Senate Clean Energy Bill 2011 and related bills - In committee - Agree to the bills

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to agree to the bills without amendments or requests for amendments.

Passing this motion ends the discussion of the bills in detail. The next step is for the senators to vote on whether to read the bills for a third time.(The third reading division is available here. )

The eighteen bills are a package to implement a carbon pricing mechanism, which is a key policy of the Labor Government.

The eighteen bills are:

Background to the bills

The carbon pricing mechanism is set to begin on 1 July 2012.(Read more about the carbon pricing mechanism on the Clean Energy Regulator’s website.) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It will apply to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon will be fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market.

References

No Yes Passed by a small majority

8th Nov 2011 – Senate Clean Energy Bill 2011 - In Committee - When charge payable

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The majority voted against an amendment to the Clean Energy Bill 2011, moved by Liberal Senator Simon Birmingham and Independent Senator Nick Xenophon.

Senator Birmingham explained that "[t]hese amendments would ensure that at least 90 per cent of the up-front costs associated with the advance purchase of permits by electricity generators would be removed".(Read the rest of Senator Birmingham's and the associated debate here. The relevant debate commences at 11:04 am.) He said that this would "ensure that unnecessary electricity price rises above the gross electricity price rises already imposed under this legislation could be avoided".

The Clean Energy Bill 2011 is one of a package of eighteen bills to implement a carbon pricing mechanism, which is a key policy of the Australian Labor Party while in Government.

The eighteen bills were:

Background to the bills

The carbon pricing mechanism would commence on 1 July 2012. It is an emissions trading scheme that will put a price on carbon emissions. It will apply to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon will be fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market.

For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website.

References

Yes No Not passed by a small majority

7th Nov 2011 – Senate Clean Energy Bill 2011 and related bills - In Committee - Defer commencement of the carbon price

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The majority voted in favour of an amendment to the Clean Energy Bill 2011 that would defer commencing the carbon price mechanism until after the election of the 44th Parliament. It was introduced by Liberal Senator Simon Birmingham.

The Clean Energy Bill 2011 is part of a package of eighteen bills to implement a carbon pricing mechanism, which is a key policy of the Labor Government.

The eighteen bills are:

Background to the bills

The carbon pricing mechanism is set to begin on 1 July 2012.(Read more about the carbon pricing mechanism on the Clean Energy Regulator’s website.) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It will apply to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon will be fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market.

References

Yes No (strong) Not passed by a small majority

3rd Nov 2011 – Senate Clean Energy Bill 2011 and related bills - Second Reading - Read a second time

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to read the bills a second time.

This means that the senators agree with the main idea of the bills and can now discuss them in detail.

The eighteen bills are a package to implement a carbon pricing mechanism, which is a key policy of the Labor Government.

The eighteen bills are:

Background to the bills

The carbon pricing mechanism is set to begin on 1 July 2012.(Read more about the carbon pricing mechanism on the Clean Energy Regulator’s website.) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It will apply to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon will be fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market.

References

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

12th Oct 2011 – Senate Clean Energy Bill 2011 and related bills - First Reading - Read for a first time

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The majority voted in favour of a motion that the bills be read a first time. The eighteen bills are a package to implement a carbon pricing mechanism.

Passing this motion means that the bills can be introduced into the Senate. According to Odgers’ Australian Senate Practice, “the first reading is normally passed without opposition and is regarded as a purely formal stage”, so the fact that the Senate divided to vote on this motion demonstrates how controversial the carbon pricing mechanism was.

The carbon price is a key policy of the Labor Government.

The eighteen bills are:

Background to the bills

The carbon pricing mechanism is set to begin on 1 July 2012.(Read more about the carbon pricing mechanism on the Clean Energy Regulator’s website.) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It will apply to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon will be fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market.

References

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

12th Oct 2011 – Senate Clean Energy Bill 2011 and related bills - First Reading - Take the bills together

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The majority voted in favour of a motion that these bills may be taken together.

This is a procedural motion and means that the Senate can now vote on reading the eighteen bills for a first time in one vote,(See that division here. ) as opposed to having to vote on each of the bills separately.

Background to the bills

The Clean Energy Bill 2011 and seventeen related bills are designed to introduce the carbon pricing mechanism,(For more detail about the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website.) which will commence on 1 July 2012. It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon will be fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market.

The eighteen bills are:

References

No Yes Passed by a small majority

12th Oct 2011 – Senate Clean Energy Bill 2011 and related bills - First Reading - Proceed without formalities

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The majority voted in favour of a motion that these bills may proceed without formalities.

This is a procedural motion which "has the effect of suspending the requirements, otherwise imposed by the standing orders, for stages of the passage of the bill or bills to take place on different days, for notice of motions for such stages, and for the printing and certification of the bill or bills during passage". By passing this motion, the Senate was then able to vote on whether to read the bill for the first time.(That division is available to read here. )

Background to the bills

The Clean Energy Bill 2011 and seventeen related bills are designed to introduce the carbon pricing mechanism,(For more detail about the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website.) which will commence on 1 July 2012. It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon will be fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market.

The eighteen bills were:

References

No Yes Passed by a small majority

How "voted very strongly against" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 4 0 200
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 4 0 40
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 0 0 0
Total: 0 240

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 0 / 240 = 0.0%.

And then