How Mehmet Tillem voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should introduce a carbon pricing mechanism

Division Mehmet Tillem Supporters vote Division outcome

20th Mar 2014, 12:43 PM – Senate Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 and related bills - Third Reading - Read a third time

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The majority voted against a motion to read the bills for a third time, which was introduced by Liberal Senator Mathias Cormann.

This means that the majority disagreed with the bills and did not want to pass them through the Senate,(Read more about this division on ABC News. ) meaning that the bills will not proceed to become law.

Background to the bills

The Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 and related bills were introduced as a package to remove the carbon pricing mechanism, which was introduced by the Australian Labor Party while in government. The Coalition described the mechanism as a “carbon tax” and removing it was a key policy platform during the 2013 election.(You can read more about the Coalition's policy to remove the carbon price here. )

The carbon pricing mechanism commenced on 1 July 2012.(For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website.) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon is fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market, though the Labor Government did announce plans to bring this forward to 1 July 2014 just before they were defeated by the Coalition in the 2013 election.

The ten other related bills are:

References

No No (strong) Not passed by a small majority

17th Mar 2014, 1:59 PM – Senate Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 and related bills - Second Reading - Read a second time

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to read the bill for a second time.(Read more about the stages a bill must pass through here. )

The motion was phrased like this: "That these bills be now read a second time but the Senate calls on the Government to recognise the scientific expert consensus regarding climate change and that the repeal of the carbon tax must be accompanied by the introduction of serious and comprehensive policies to address climate change."

This means that the majority agree with the main idea of the bill, subject to the proviso contained in the motion.

Background to the bills

The Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 and related bills were introduced as a package to remove the carbon pricing mechanism, which was introduced by the Australian Labor Party while in government. The Coalition described the mechanism as a “carbon tax” and removing it was a key policy platform during the 2013 election.(You can read more about the Coalition's policy to remove the carbon price here. )

The carbon pricing mechanism commenced on 1 July 2012.(For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website.) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon is fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market, though the Labor Government did announce plans to bring this forward to 1 July 2014 just before they were defeated by the Coalition in the 2013 election.

The ten other related bills are:

Yes No (strong) Passed by a large majority

3rd Mar 2014, 12:39 PM – Senate Climate Change Authority (Abolition) Bill 2013 - Second reading - Read a second time

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The majority voted against a motion to read the bill for a second time.(Read more about this division in the Australian. )

This means that the majority of senators disagree with the main idea of the bill, which was to abolish the Climate Change Authority, and that the bill has been rejected.

Background to the motion

The Climate Change Authority (Abolition) Bill 2013 was introduced to abolish the Climate Change Authority ('CCA'), which was established by the Labor government to provide independent advice on Australia’s emissions reduction targets, and other Australian Government climate change initiatives.(Read more about the CCA on its website here. It was created by the Climate Change Authority Bill 2011. )

Abolishing the CCA is a key Coalition policy.(Read more in the media.)

No No Not passed by a small majority

3rd Mar 2014, 12:35 PM – Senate Climate Change Authority (Abolition) Bill 2013 - Second reading - Express concern about abolition

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The majority voted in favour of a motion introduced by Labor Senator Louise Pratt that:

At the end of the motion to read the bill for a second time, add: “, but the Senate expresses concern over the impact of the abolition of the Climate Change Authority on the provision of independent advice to Government and the public on carbon pollution reduction targets and actions.”

This amendment doesn't change the effect of the amended motion and so is more of a symbolic move to show the majority of senator's dissatisfaction with the Climate Change Authority (Abolition) Bill 2013.

Background to the motion

This bill was introduced to abolish the Climate Change Authority ('CCA'), which was established by the Labor government to provide independent advice on Australia’s emissions reduction targets, and other Australian Government climate change initiatives.(Read more about the CCA on its website here. It was created by the Climate Change Authority Bill 2011. )

Abolishing the CCA is a key Coalition policy.(Read more in the media.)

Yes Yes Passed by a small majority

9th Dec 2013, 4:49 PM – Senate Motions - Climate Change - support Climate Smart Tasmania and condemn repeal of carbon price

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The majority voted in favour of a motion introduced by Greens Senator Christine Milne, which was:

That the Senate—

(a) supports the Tasmanian Government's Climate Smart strategy(Read more about this strategy on the Tasmanian Department of Premier and Cabinet website here and in the media here.) which aims to achieve 100 per cent renewable production and a 35 per cent cut in emissions on 1990 levels by 2020; and

(b) condemns the Abbott Government's attempts to repeal the carbon price, which will remove up to $70 million per year from Hydro Tasmania and dividend payments to the Tasmanian budget.

Yes Yes Passed by a small majority

2nd Dec 2013, 8:34 PM – Senate Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 and related bills — First Reading — Consider the legislation together

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The majority voted against a motion that the bills be considered together.

This means that each of the eleven bills will have to be considered separately.

The eleven bills are a package to remove the carbon pricing mechanism, which was introduced by the Australian Labor Party while in government. The Coalition described the mechanism as a “carbon tax” and removing it was a key policy platform during the 2013 election.(You can read more about the Coalition's policy to remove the carbon price here. )

The eleven bills are:

Background to the bills

The carbon pricing mechanism commenced on 1 July 2012.(For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website.) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon is fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market, though the Labor Government did announce plans to bring this forward to 1 July 2014 just before they were defeated by the Coalition in the 2013 election.

No No Not passed by a small majority

How "voted moderately for" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 1 50 50
MP voted against policy 1 0 50
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 4 40 40
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 0 0 0
Total: 90 140

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 90 / 140 = 64%.

And then