How Jane Hume voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should develop a specific Coronavirus (COVID-19) response package for the Arts and Entertainment sector as many workers in that sector are ineligible for the JobKeeper Payment

Division Jane Hume Supporters vote Division outcome

2nd Sep 2021, 10:48 AM – Senate Treasury Laws Amendment (2021 Measures No. 2) Bill 2021 - in Committee - Live Performance Federal Insurance Guarantee Fund

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The majority voted against amendments introduced by South Australian Senator Sarah Hanson-Young (Greens), which means they failed.

What does the amendment do?

Senator Hanson-Young explained that:

This amendment is in relation to a much-needed avenue of support for our arts and entertainment industry, which we know has been smashed throughout the COVID-19 period and the pandemic. Lockdowns, border closures and health restrictions have meant that live performances and other types of live events, in particular, just don't have certainty going forward.

The insurance industry has, of course, done what the insurance industry always does: it has put up higher premiums, which effectively squeeze anyone in the real world out of being able to access them. This amendment simply requests of the government that they establish an insurance guarantee for live performance and live events going forward.

Amendment text

(1) Page 12 (after line 14), at the end of the Bill, add:

Schedule 3 — Live Performance Federal Insurance Guarantee Fund

1 Live Performance Federal Insurance Guarantee Fund

(1) There is to be a Live Performance Federal Insurance Guarantee Fund.

(2) The Treasurer must, by legislative instrument, make rules to provide for and in relation to the establishment, governance and operation of the Fund, the purpose of which is to provide for a fund to underwrite an insurance scheme for the live performance sector to fill a market failure in the insurance industry as a result of the COVID 19 pandemic.

(3) Money for the Fund is to be from funds appropriated by the Parliament for the purposes of this Act.

(4) The Treasurer must make rules for the purposes of subsection (2) within 30 days after the commencement of this Act.

No Yes Not passed by a small majority

23rd Feb 2021, 4:57 PM – Senate Motions - Jobkeeper Payment - Arts and Entertainment Industry

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by SA Senator Sarah Hanson-Young (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes:

(i) it has almost been one year since COVID-19 physical distancing rules effectively shut down the arts and entertainment industry overnight,

(ii) hundreds of thousands of workers in the arts and entertainment industry have been impacted, as well as those in industries which rely on a thriving arts sector, like accommodation, hospitality and tourism,

(iii) the industry is still in crisis, with international and domestic border restrictions and social distancing rules impacting its ability to operate at full capacity and many people remain out of work, and

(iv) the arts and entertainment sector contributes about $15 billion annually to the Australian economy; and

(b) calls on the Morrison Government to:

(i) extend JobKeeper beyond 28 March 2021; and

(ii) provide an industry-specific recovery package for the arts and entertainment industry of the quantum actually required to save jobs and a generation of arts and entertainment workers.

No Yes Not passed by a small majority

8th Apr 2020, 8:22 PM – Senate Coronavirus Economic Response Package (Payments and Benefits) Bill 2020 and related bills - Second Reading - JobKeeper accessibility and the Arts

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The majority voted against an amendment to the usual second reading motion "that the bill be read for a second time" (which is parliamentary jargon for agreeing with the main idea of the bill). This mean that the amendment failed.

This amendment was introduced by Tasmanian Senator Peter Whish-Wilson (Greens) and, if it had been successful, its text would have been added to the usual second reading motion as a note. In other words, it didn't seek to change the actual text of the bills.

Senator Whish-Wilson explained the rationale behind his amendment in his contribution to the debate.

Amendment text

At the end of the motion, add ", but the Senate:

(a) is of the opinion that the arts, entertainment, creative and events industries, and hospitality and tourism industries have been severely hit by this crisis and are not getting adequate support from this package;

(b) calls on the Treasurer to ensure the following categories of businesses and workers are able to access the JobKeeper Program:

(i) casual workers who have not been with the same employer for 12 months,

(ii) freelance performers, content creators, and crew who are engaged as direct employees on short-term contracts on a project by project basis but are not registered as a business,

(iii) businesses that do not have a consistent stream of linear revenue across the year, such as those working on screen and stage productions, festivals and events, and therefore the revenue test is not applicable and should instead be for a comparable period not month, and

(iv) entities that are established as dedicated Special Purpose Vehicles which is common in the arts, entertainment and events sectors for individual projects, and are unlikely to meet the various tests and requirements therefore excluding many workers; and

(c) is of the opinion that the arts, entertainment and creative industries need a tailored package to provide adequate support immediately and to assist recovery after the crisis, which should include:

(i) restoring and increasing Australia Council funding to expand access for individuals and organisations to access grants,

(ii) establish a Content Creator Fund for the production of local content to support high quality local content, our creative industries and, importantly, allow Australians to keep telling their own stories, and

(iii) local content requirements for broadcast, radio, subscription and streaming services, such as Netflix, Amazon, Stan, Apple and Spotify".

No Yes Not passed by a small majority

8th Apr 2020, 8:19 PM – Senate Coronavirus Economic Response Package (Payments and Benefits) Bill 2020 and related bills - Second Reading - Accessibility of support

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The majority voted against an amendment to the usual second reading motion "that the bill be read for a second time" (which is parliamentary jargon for agreeing with the main idea of the bill). This mean that the amendment failed.

This amendment was introduced by NSW Senator Tony Sheldon (Labor) and, if it had been successful, its text would have been added to the usual second reading motion as a note. In other words, it didn't seek to change the actual text of the bills.

Senator Sheldon explained the rationale behind his amendment in his contribution to the debate.

Amendment text

At the end of the motion, add ", but the Senate calls on the Government to:

(a) ensure that the JobKeeper wage subsidy is only used by employers to pay their employees' wages and not to subsidise their company's balance sheet, noting that there should be no provision for business to force employees to use their annual leave entitlements and pay for that leave with the JobKeeper wage subsidy;

(b) recognise that the Australian arts and entertainment sector needs a specific, tailored, fiscal response package to ensure its ongoing viability, given the structure of the JobKeeper payment has been designed in a way that leaves many workers in the sector ineligible;

(c) extend the 15 per cent reduction in turnover threshold to all National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) and Disability Employment Services (DES) providers, and deliver a retention and support package for the disability sector workforce;

(d) provide much more support for staff in schools, TAFEs, and universities affected by this crisis, noting that:

(i) hundreds of thousands of school and university staff, including casual workers, are facing job losses, but will not be eligible for this JobKeeper payment, and

(ii) the Government should be saving jobs and making sure Australia has a strong and sustainable education and training sector on the other side of this crisis;

(e) recognise the importance of local government, acknowledging that the closure of council facilities has resulted in significant revenue loss and workers being stood down and that without support, up to 45,000 local government workers could lose their jobs, demonstrating the need for the Government to work together with state governments to address these important issues; and

(f) note that a number of major charities will be unable to access the JobKeeper program, and will have to shed staff and cease programs as a result".

No Yes Not passed by a small majority

How "voted very strongly against" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 4 0 40
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 0 0 0
Total: 0 40

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 0 / 40 = 0.0%.

And then