How Robert Simms voted compared to someone who believes that Members of Parliament (MPs) and Senators should vote to speed things along by supporting motions to 'put the question' (known as 'closure' or 'gag' motions), which require Parliament to immediately vote on a question rather than debating it any further

Division Robert Simms Supporters vote Division outcome

17th Mar 2016, 12:01 PM – Senate Marriage Equality Amendment Bill 2013 - Second Reading - Speed things along

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The majority voted against a motion to stop debate and vote on the question immediately. In parliamentary jargon, they voted against a motion that the question now be put.

Because the motion failed, debate will continue.

Yes Yes (strong) Not passed by a modest majority

2nd Mar 2016, 12:05 PM – Senate Commonwealth Electoral Amendment Bill 2016 - First Reading - Put the question

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The majority voted in favour of a motion introduced by the Leader of the Government in the Senate, Liberal Senator George Brandis:

The question is that the question be now put.

This is a 'closure of debate' motion, which means it ends debate on a particular question so that the Senate can vote immediately on it. Basically, this motion is to speed things along.

What was the question?

That the provisions of paragraphs (5) to (8) of standing order 111 not apply to this bill, allowing it to be considered during this period of sittings.

Read more about that motion and about standing orders in general.

Yes Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

2nd Mar 2016, 11:57 AM – Senate Commonwealth Electoral Amendment Bill 2016 - First Reading - Put the question

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The majority voted in favour of the following motion put by Liberal Senator George Brandis:

That the question be now put.

This is a 'closure of debate' motion, which means it ends debate on a particular question so that the Senate can vote immediately on it. Basically, this motion is to speed things along.

What was the question?

The question that could then be asked without further debate was:

That a motion to exempt these bills from the bills cut-off order may be moved immediately and determined without amendment or debate.

Read more about this motion.

Yes Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

2nd Mar 2016, 11:49 AM – Senate Commonwealth Electoral Amendment Bill 2016 - First Reading - Put the question

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The majority voted in favour of a motion introduced by Liberal Senator George Brandis:

That that question be now put.

This is a 'closure of debate' motion, which means it ends debate on a particular question so that the Senate can vote immediately on it. Basically, this motion is to speed things along.

What was the question?

The question now is that the suspension motion moved by Senator Brandis be agreed to.

Read more about this motion.

Yes Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

2nd Mar 2016, 11:36 AM – Senate Commonwealth Electoral Amendment Bill 2016 - First Reading - Put the question

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The majority voted in favour of the following motion put by Liberal Senator George Brandis:

That the question be now put.

This is a 'closure of debate' motion, which means it ends debate on a particular question so that the Senate can vote immediately on it. Basically, this motion is to speed things along.

What was the question?

The question that could then be asked without further debate was whether:

this bill may now proceed without formalities.

Read more about this motion.

Yes Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

2nd Mar 2016, 11:24 AM – Senate Commonwealth Electoral Amendment Bill 2016 - First Reading - Put the question

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The majority voted in favour of a motion introduced by the Leader of the Government in the Senate, Liberal Senator George Brandis.

That the question be now put.

This is a 'closure of debate' motion, which means it ends debate on a particular question so that the Senate can vote immediately on it. Basically, this motion is to speed things along.

What was the question?

The question that could then be asked without further debate was:

The question now is that the amendment moved by Senator Collins be agreed to.

Read more about that motion.

Yes Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

How "voted very strongly for" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 6 300 300
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 0 0 0
Total: 300 300

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 300 / 300 = 100%.

And then