How Pauline Hanson voted compared to someone who believes that the date of Australia Day should be changed from 26 January, which was the day the First Fleet arrived at Port Jackson, Sydney, and is a day of mourning for many Australians

Division Pauline Hanson Supporters vote Division outcome

8th Feb 2018, 11:58 AM – Senate Motions - Australia Day - Change the date

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The majority voted against a motion, which means it was rejected.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) acknowledges that:

(i) on 26 January 2018, tens of thousands of Australians around the country marched in solidarity with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples calling on Governments to change the date of Australia Day, and

(ii) 26 January is a day of mourning for many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples, as it represents the beginning of colonisation, the theft of their land, the decimation of their culture and the start of ongoing genocide; and

(b) calls on federal, state and territory governments to change the date of Australia Day so that everyone can participate in celebrating this national day.

No Yes (strong) Not passed by a large majority

6th Dec 2017, 4:05 PM – Senate Motions - Australia Day - Consultation on changing the date

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The majority voted against a motion to consult with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples about changing the date of Australia Day.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) acknowledges that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples are the First Peoples of these lands and waters;

(b) recognises that 26 January is considered a day of mourning for many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples as it represents the beginning of colonisation;

(c) acknowledges the growing calls from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and organisations, local governments and the community to change the date;

(d) urges all Australians to respectfully engage in conversations about changing the date of Australia Day; and

(e) calls on the Federal Government to engage and consult with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples about changing the date of Australia Day, so that all Australians can participate in celebrating this national day.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

29th Nov 2017, 4:19 PM – Senate Motions - Australian Broadcasting Corporation - Triple J's Hottest 100 + Australia Day

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The majority voted against a motion objecting to changing the date of Triple J's Hottest 100 from Australia Day (26 January).

According to ABC News, this change has been made in light of "the "increasing debate" about January 26 and its meaning for Indigenous Australians."

Motion text

(1) That the Senate:

(a) notes that Australia Day is on 26 January and should remain so; and

(b) recognises that Triple J's Hottest 100 has become an iconic event since it was first proposed during Australia's bicentennial year in 1988.

(2) The Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) Charter states a function of the Corporation is to broadcast programs that contribute to a sense of national identity.

(3) The ABC should restore the Hottest 100 to Australia Day, 26 January.

absent No Not passed by a small majority

29th Nov 2017, 3:52 PM – Senate Motions - Australian Broadcasting Corporation - Triple J's Hottest 100 + Australia Day

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The majority voted against a motion that supports the decision of ABC's Triple J to change the date of its Hottest 100 from 26 January (Australia Day) to the fourth weekend in January.

According to ABC News, this change has been made in light of "the "increasing debate" about January 26 and its meaning for Indigenous Australians."

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes Triple J's decision to move its iconic Hottest 100 from 26 January to the fourth weekend in January;

(b) acknowledges the consultation process undertaken, in which almost 65 000 people participated in a questionnaire about the Hottest 100 date, with 60 per cent in favour of moving the date;

(c) notes the Triple J Hottest 100 debuted on 5 March 1989;

(d) reminds the Minister for the Arts and the Minister for Communications (Senator Fifield), of the importance of the independence of the ABC, and calls on him not to interfere with decisions of the broadcaster; and

(e) urges other organisations and community groups to consult their communities about celebrations and events held on 26 January.

absent Yes Not passed by a modest majority

13th Nov 2017, 7:53 PM – Senate Regulations - Citizenship (Authorisation) Revocation and Authorisation Instrument 2017 and another - Disallow

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The majority voted against a motion to disallow two instruments. If this motion had been successful then the two instruments would have stopped having legal force.

Senator Nick McKim explained that:

This disallowance motion obviously relates to the actions of two councils in Victoria that quite appropriately and after deep consultation with their local communities made a decision not to conduct citizenship ceremonies on Australia Day.

Motion text

That the following legislative instruments, made under the Australian Citizenship Act 2007, be disallowed:

(a) the Citizenship (Authorisation) Revocation and Authorisation Instrument 2017 [F2017L01044]; and

(b) the Citizenship (Authorisation) Revocation and Authorisation Amendment Instrument 2017 [F2017L01074].

No Yes Not passed by a small majority

17th Aug 2017, 12:45 PM – Senate Motions - Australia Day - City of Yarra Council

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The majority voted in favour of a motion that condemns the City of Yarra Council's actions in respect to Australia Day. Motions like these don't have any legal force, but can be influential as they represent the will of the Senate.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) condemns the move by the City of Yarra Council to change the way it marks Australia Day;

(b) endorses the remarks by the Prime Minister that this attack on Australia Day by the City of Yarra is a repudiation of the values of 'freedom, a fair go, mateship and diversity';

(c) stands resolute in its view that Australia Day is a day that all Australians come together as a nation, to celebrate the values that make Australia great and that make people proud of Australian citizenship;

(d) notes that all Australian states and territories have celebrated Australia Day on 26 January since 1935; and

(e) calls on the Australian Government to strip the City of Yarra Council of its authorisation to conduct citizenship ceremonies.

Yes No Passed by a small majority

9th Feb 2017, 12:39 PM – Senate Motions - Australia Day - Change the date

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Australian Greens Party Senator Rachel Siewert (WA), which means it was unsuccessful. The motion called for the governments of Australia (federal, state and territory) to change the date of Australia Day "so that all Australians can participate in celebrating this national day".

This year, thousands of Australians took part in rallies around the country to mark 26 January as the mark of invasion.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) acknowledges:

(i) that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are the First Peoples of these lands and waters,

(ii) that 26 January is a day of mourning for many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples as it represents the beginning of colonisation, and

(iii) the call from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations, local governments and community support to change the date; and

(b) calls on federal, state and territory governments to change the date of Australia Day so that all Australians can participate in celebrating this national day.

No Yes (strong) Not passed by a large majority

How "voted very strongly against" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 2 0 100
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 3 0 30
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 2 2 4
Total: 2 134

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 2 / 134 = 1.5%.

And then