How Joe Ludwig voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should take national action to increase housing affordability so that all Australians have the chance to buy their own home

Division Joe Ludwig Supporters vote Division outcome

17th Jun 2015, 3:57 PM – Senate Motions - Housing Affordability - First home buyers and public housing

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The majority voted against a motion on housing affordability introduced by Greens Senator Lee Rhiannon, which means it was unsuccessful.

Note that housing is primarily a matter for the state governments, rather than the federal government.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) the median Sydney house price has increased from $73 000 in 1985 to over $914 000 in 2015,

(ii) the ratio of housing price to income in Sydney has increased from 3.4 to 11.4 over that same period,

(iii) currently 41 per cent of all housing finance is for the purposes of investment, compared to 16 per cent in 1992, and

(iv) a poll published in the week beginning 14 June 2015 found that 80 per cent of Sydneysiders said housing was not affordable, compared to a national average of 69 per cent; and

(b) calls on the Government to immediately review the existing beneficial tax arrangements for property investment with a view to improving housing affordability for first home buyers, and providing housing for those on social housing waiting lists and those experiencing homelessness.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

18th Sep 2007, 4:02 PM – Senate Motions - Housing Affordability - Evidence-based national plan

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The majority voted against a motion calling for an evidence-based national affordable housing plan, which means it was unsuccessful. The motion was introduced by Greens Senator Rachel Siewert (WA).

Motion text

That the Senate calls on the Government to:

(a) review all taxes, grants and concessions, including negative gearing, capital gains tax exemptions and first home owners grants, to assess their impact on the housing market; and

(b) work with the states and territories to develop an evidence-based national affordable housing plan.

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

How "voted very strongly against" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 2 0 20
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 0 0 0
Total: 0 20

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 0 / 20 = 0.0%.

And then