How Fraser Anning voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should encourage Australian-based industry and secure the jobs these industries create by, for example, providing incentives for companies to stay in Australia

Division Fraser Anning Supporters vote Division outcome

7th Feb 2018, 4:05 PM – Senate Motions - Rail Industry - Rail manufacturing

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The majority voted in favour of a motion, which means it passed. These sorts of motions don't have any legal force but they can be politically influential as they represent the will of the Senate.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) the NSW government has awarded $4 billion in contracts to build the Intercity and Waratah train fleets overseas, and

(ii) this decision by the NSW government will impact local rail manufacturers and supply chain businesses, and puts up to 15 000 existing jobs across Australia at risk; and

(b) calls on the Commonwealth and all states to cooperate and strengthen rail manufacturing in Australia by:

(i) establishing a National Rail Manufacturing Industry Plan to maximise the benefits from the $46 billion investment expected over the next decade,

(ii) working together to achieve a long-term, sustainable and efficient rail industry that will provide job security for local rail manufacturers,

(iii) harmonising safety standards that would maximise manufacturing efficiencies, and

(iv) working with the rail industry to develop Rail Industry Skills Centres at local TAFE and colleges, and ensuring the use of local apprentices, trainees and engineering cadets for at least ten per cent of the total labour hours.

No Yes Passed by a small majority

How "voted strongly against" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 1 0 10
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 1 1 2
Total: 1 12

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 1 / 12 = 8.3%.

And then