How Barry O'Sullivan voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should introduce a carbon pricing mechanism

Division Barry O'Sullivan Supporters vote Division outcome

28th Nov 2018, 3:50 PM – Senate Motions - Climate Change - Carbon price

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Richard Di Natale, which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) the sharpest ever drop recorded in Australia's greenhouse pollution occurred during the two-year period of the carbon pricing mechanism, and

(ii) during the carbon price, inflation was contained, the economy grew by 4.7% as emissions dropped by 8.2%, compared to the two-year period before the carbon price; and

(b) supports the widely held position of economists, industry and environment groups that an economy-wide carbon price is the lowest cost, most effective way to reduce pollution and encourage investment in the industries of the future.

absent Yes Not passed by a modest majority

17th Jul 2014, 11:10 AM – Senate Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2014 and related bills - Third Reading - Read a third time

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to read the bills for a third time,(Read more about the stages that a bill must pass through to become law here. ) which means that they agree to pass the bills in the Senate and that the bills will now become law.

Background to the bills

The Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2014 and related bills were introduced to repeal the carbon pricing mechanism, which was introduced by the Australian Labor Party while in government. The Coalition described the mechanism as a “carbon tax” and removing it was a key policy platform during the 2013 election.(You can read more about the Coalition's policy to remove the carbon price here. )

The carbon pricing mechanism commenced on 1 July 2012.(For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website. ) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon is fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market, though the Labor Government did announce plans to bring this forward to 1 July 2014 just before they were defeated by the Coalition in the 2013 election.

This is the third time that this package of bills have been introduced. The first time, they were rejected in the Senate during the third reading stage.(See that division here. ) The second time, they were rejected in the Senate during the committee stage.(See that division here. Read more about this second rejection of this package of bills on ABC News here or on the World Today here.)

The bills included in this package are the following:

Yes No (strong) Passed by a small majority

17th Jul 2014, 10:51 AM – Senate Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2014 and related bills — Adoption of Report — Adopt the report

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The majority voted in favour of a motion "that the report from the committee be adopted". This means that the majority agree with the committee's decision to agree to the bill.(Read more about the stages that a bill must pass through to become law here. ) They can now vote on whether to read the bill for a third time and therefore pass the bill in the Senate.

Background to the bills

The Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2014 and related bills were introduced to repeal the carbon pricing mechanism, which was introduced by the Australian Labor Party while in government. The Coalition described the mechanism as a “carbon tax” and removing it was a key policy platform during the 2013 election.(You can read more about the Coalition's policy to remove the carbon price here. )

The carbon pricing mechanism commenced on 1 July 2012.(For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website. ) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon is fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market, though the Labor Government did announce plans to bring this forward to 1 July 2014 just before they were defeated by the Coalition in the 2013 election.

This is the third time that this package of bills have been introduced. The first time, they were rejected in the Senate during the third reading stage.(See that division here. ) The second time, they were rejected in the Senate during the committee stage.(See that division here. Read more about this second rejection of this package of bills on ABC News here or on the World Today here.)

The bills included in this package are the following:

Yes No (strong) Passed by a small majority

17th Jul 2014, 10:46 AM – Senate Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2014 and related bills — In Committee — Bills stand as printed

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The majority voted in favour of a motion "that the bills stand as printed". This means that the majority of senators agree with the bill and want it to remain unchanged.(Read more about the stages that a bill must pass through to become law here. )

Background to the bills

The Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2014 and related bills were introduced to repeal the carbon pricing mechanism, which was introduced by the Australian Labor Party while in government. The Coalition described the mechanism as a “carbon tax” and removing it was a key policy platform during the 2013 election.(You can read more about the Coalition's policy to remove the carbon price here. )

The carbon pricing mechanism commenced on 1 July 2012.(For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website. ) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon is fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market, though the Labor Government did announce plans to bring this forward to 1 July 2014 just before they were defeated by the Coalition in the 2013 election.

This is the third time that this package of bills have been introduced. The first time, they were rejected in the Senate during the third reading stage.(See that division here. ) The second time, they were rejected in the Senate during the committee stage.(See that division here. Read more about this second rejection of this package of bills on ABC News here or on the World Today here.)

The bills included in this package are the following:

Yes No (strong) Passed by a small majority

17th Jul 2014, 10:24 AM – Senate Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2014 — In Committee — Keep schedules 2 to 4

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The majority voted in favour of a motion "that schedules 2 to 4 stand as printed", which means that the schedules will remain unchanged. Deputy-President Gavin Marshall put this motion to the Senate after Labor Senator Lisa Singh moved an amendment to oppose those schedules.

Schedule 2 "prohibit[s] carbon tax-related price exploitation and false or misleading representations". Schedule 3 "repeals the conservation tillage tax offset". Schedule 4 "repeals the Steel Transformation Plan Act 2011".(Read more about these schedules in the explanatory memorandum. )

Background to the bills

The Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2014 and related bills were introduced to repeal the carbon pricing mechanism, which was introduced by the Australian Labor Party while in government. The Coalition described the mechanism as a “carbon tax” and removing it was a key policy platform during the 2013 election.(You can read more about the Coalition's policy to remove the carbon price here. )

The carbon pricing mechanism commenced on 1 July 2012.(For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website. ) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon is fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market, though the Labor Government did announce plans to bring this forward to 1 July 2014 just before they were defeated by the Coalition in the 2013 election.

This is the third time that this package of bills have been introduced. The first time, they were rejected in the Senate during the third reading stage.(See that division here. ) The second time, they were rejected in the Senate during the committee stage.(See that division here. Read more about this second rejection of this package of bills on ABC News here or on the World Today here.)

The bills included in this package are the following:

Yes No Passed by a small majority

15th Jul 2014, 9:36 PM – Senate Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2014 and related bills - Second Reading - Read a second time

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to read the bills for a second time, which means that they agree with the main idea of the bills and that they can now discuss them in greater detail.

Background to the bills

The Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2014 and related bills were introduced to remove the carbon pricing mechanism, which was introduced by the Australian Labor Party while in government. The Coalition described the mechanism as a “carbon tax” and removing it was a key policy platform during the 2013 election.(You can read more about the Coalition's policy to remove the carbon price here. )

The carbon pricing mechanism commenced on 1 July 2012.(For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website. ) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon is fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market, though the Labor Government did announce plans to bring this forward to 1 July 2014 just before they were defeated by the Coalition in the 2013 election.

This is the third time that this package of bills have been introduced. The first time, they were rejected in the Senate during the third reading stage.(See that division here. ) The second time, they were rejected in the Senate during the committee stage.(See that division here. Read more about this second rejection of this package of bills on ABC News here or on the World Today here.)

The bills included in this package are the following:

Yes No (strong) Passed by a large majority

10th Jul 2014, 12:23 PM – Senate Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No. 2] and related bills - In Committee - Adopt the committee's report and so reject the bills

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The majority voted in favour of a motion "that the report of the committee be adopted". This means that the majority agree with the report from the committee stage in which the committee voted against the bills.(See the previous division in which the committee voted against the bills here. ) Adopting the report means that the bills are now rejected in the Senate and will not be considered further.

Background to the bills

The Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 (No. 2) and related bills were introduced to remove the carbon pricing mechanism, which was introduced by the Australian Labor Party while in government. The Coalition described the mechanism as a “carbon tax” and removing it was a key policy platform during the 2013 election.(You can read more about the Coalition's policy to remove the carbon price here. )

The carbon pricing mechanism commenced on 1 July 2012.(For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website. ) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon is fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market, though the Labor Government did announce plans to bring this forward to 1 July 2014 just before they were defeated by the Coalition in the 2013 election.

This is the second time that this package of bills has been introduced, after they were rejected in the Senate during the third reading stage the first time round.(See that division here. )

The other related bills that were introduced along with the Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 (No. 2) are:

The Clean Energy (Income Tax Rates and Other Amendments) Bill 2013 (No. 2) was introduced along with these bills but was rejected in the Senate at the second reading stage.(See that division here.)

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

10th Jul 2014, 12:16 PM – Senate Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No. 2] and related bills - In Committee - Agree to bills

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The majority voted against a motion "that the Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 (No. 2) as amended and seven related bills be agreed to". This means that the majority reject the bills in their current form.

Rejecting bills in the committee stage(Read about the stages that a bill must pass through to become law here. ) is unusual "because the opportunity to reject a bill completely is at the second reading, and if the committee of the whole has agreed to amendments it should not be rejecting the bill as amended".(See Odgers' Australian Senate Practice here. ) The committee will now report to the Senate that the bills have been negatived in committee and the Senate will vote on whether adopt the report or not.(See that division here. )

Background to the bills

The Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 (No. 2) and related bills were introduced to remove the carbon pricing mechanism, which was introduced by the Australian Labor Party while in government. The Coalition described the mechanism as a “carbon tax” and removing it was a key policy platform during the 2013 election.(You can read more about the Coalition's policy to remove the carbon price here. )

The carbon pricing mechanism commenced on 1 July 2012.(For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website. ) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon is fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market, though the Labor Government did announce plans to bring this forward to 1 July 2014 just before they were defeated by the Coalition in the 2013 election.

This is the second time that this package of bills has been introduced, after they were rejected in the Senate during the third reading stage the first time round.(See that division here. )

The other related bills that were introduced along with the Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 (No. 2) are:

The Clean Energy (Income Tax Rates and Other Amendments) Bill 2013 (No. 2) was introduced along with these bills but was rejected in the Senate at the second reading stage.(See that division here.)

Yes No (strong) Not passed by a small majority

10th Jul 2014, 11:56 AM – Senate Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No. 2] - In Committee - Schedules 2 to 5

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The majority voted in favour of a motion that schedule 2 to 5 stand as printed, which means that the majority want schedules 2 to 5 of the Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No. 2] to remain unchanged. The motion was put in response to Labor amendments to oppose those schedules. Labor Senator Penny Wong explained that the amendments were introduced because "we want an emissions trading scheme".(Read Senator Wong's full explanation here. )

Background to the bills

The Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 (No. 2) and related bills were introduced to remove the carbon pricing mechanism, which was introduced by the Australian Labor Party while in government. The Coalition described the mechanism as a “carbon tax” and removing it was a key policy platform during the 2013 election.(You can read more about the Coalition's policy to remove the carbon price here. )

The carbon pricing mechanism commenced on 1 July 2012.(For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website. ) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon is fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market, though the Labor Government did announce plans to bring this forward to 1 July 2014 just before they were defeated by the Coalition in the 2013 election.

This is the second time that this package of bills has been introduced, after they were rejected in the Senate during the third reading stage the first time round.(See that division here. )

The other related bills that were introduced along with the Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 (No. 2) are:

The Clean Energy (Income Tax Rates and Other Amendments) Bill 2013 (No. 2) was previously rejected in the Senate at second reading stage.(See that division here.)

Yes No Passed by a small majority

10th Jul 2014, 9:59 AM – Senate Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No. 2] and related bills - Declaration of Urgency - Allocate time for debate

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The majority voted in favour of a motion "That the time allotted for consideration of the remaining stages of these bills be until 11.50 am",(Read more about the stages that a bill must pass through to become law here. ) which was moved by Liberal Senator Mitch Fifield. This means that the Senate can only consider these bills through their remaining stages up until that time.

Background to the bills

The Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 (No. 2) and related bills were introduced to remove the carbon pricing mechanism, which was introduced by the Australian Labor Party while in government. The Coalition described the mechanism as a “carbon tax” and removing it was a key policy platform during the 2013 election.(You can read more about the Coalition's policy to remove the carbon price here. )

The carbon pricing mechanism commenced on 1 July 2012.(For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website. ) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon is fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market, though the Labor Government did announce plans to bring this forward to 1 July 2014 just before they were defeated by the Coalition in the 2013 election.

This is the second time that this package of bills has been introduced, after they were rejected in the Senate during the third reading stage the first time round.(See that division here. )

The other related bills that were introduced along with the Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 (No. 2) are:

The Clean Energy (Income Tax Rates and Other Amendments) Bill 2013 (No. 2) was previously rejected in the Senate at second reading stage.(See that division here.)

Yes No Passed by a small majority

10th Jul 2014, 9:52 AM – Senate Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No. 2] and related bills - Declaration of Urgency - Declare bills urgent

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The majority voted in favour of a motion introduced by Liberal Senator Mitch Fifield, which means that it was successful. The motion was:

That these bills be considered urgent bills:

  • Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [N0. 2]
  • True-up Shortfall Levy (General) (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No. 2]
  • True-up Shortfall Levy (Excise) (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No. 2]
  • Customs Tariff Amendment (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No. 2]
  • Excise Tariff Amendment (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No. 2]
  • Ozone Protection and Synthetic Greenhouse Gas (Import Levy) Amendment (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No. 2]
  • Ozone Protection and Synthetic Greenhouse Gas (Import Levy) (Transitional Provisions) Bill 2013 [No. 2]
  • Ozone Protection and Synthetic Greenhouse Gas (Manufacture Levy) Amendment (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No. 2]

Background to the bills

The Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 (No. 2) and related bills were introduced to remove the carbon pricing mechanism, which was introduced by the Australian Labor Party while in government. The Coalition described the mechanism as a “carbon tax” and removing it was a key policy platform during the 2013 election.(You can read more about the Coalition's policy to remove the carbon price here. )

The carbon pricing mechanism commenced on 1 July 2012.(For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website. ) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon is fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market, though the Labor Government did announce plans to bring this forward to 1 July 2014 just before they were defeated by the Coalition in the 2013 election.

This is the second time that this package of bills has been introduced, after they were rejected in the Senate during the third reading stage the first time round.(See that division here. )

The other related bills that were introduced along with the Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 (No. 2) are:

The Clean Energy (Income Tax Rates and Other Amendments) Bill 2013 (No. 2) was previously rejected in the Senate at second reading stage.(See that division here.)

Yes No Passed by a small majority

9th Jul 2014, 11:46 AM – Senate Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No. 2] and related bills - Second Reading - Read a second time

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The majority voted in favour of a motion "that the eight bills, excluding the Clean Energy (Income Tax Rates and Other Amendments) Bill 2013 [No. 2], be read a second time."(Read more about the stages that a bill must pass through to become law here. ) This means that the majority agree with the main idea of these eight bills and want to now discuss them in more detail.

Background to the bills

The Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 (No. 2) and related bills were introduced to remove the carbon pricing mechanism, which was introduced by the Australian Labor Party while in government. The Coalition described the mechanism as a “carbon tax” and removing it was a key policy platform during the 2013 election.(You can read more about the Coalition's policy to remove the carbon price here. )

The carbon pricing mechanism commenced on 1 July 2012.(For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website. ) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon is fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market, though the Labor Government did announce plans to bring this forward to 1 July 2014 just before they were defeated by the Coalition in the 2013 election.

This is the second time that this package of bills has been introduced, after they were rejected in the Senate during the third reading stage the first time round.(See that division here.)

The other related bills that were introduced along with the Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 (No. 2) are:

Yes No (strong) Passed by a large majority

9th Jul 2014, 11:29 AM – Senate Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No. 2] and related bills - Second Reading - Reject the bills

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Christine Milne, which means that it was unsuccessful. The motion would have amended the original motion "that the bills be read for a second time" with the following:

At the end of the motion, add:

but the Senate:

(a) rejects this Bill and the related Bills;

(b) recognises that:

(i) the world is on track for 4 degrees of warming; and

(ii) warming of less than 1 degree is already intensifying extreme weather events in Australia and around the world with enormous costs to life and property;

(c) calls on the government to:

(i) protect the Australian people and environment from climate change by approving no new coal mines or extensions of existing mines, or new coal export terminals; and

(ii) adopt a trajectory of 40-60% below 2000 levels by 2030 and net carbon zero by 2050 emissions reduction target in global negotiations for a 2015 treaty.

Background to the bills

The Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 (No. 2) and related bills were introduced to remove the carbon pricing mechanism, which was introduced by the Australian Labor Party while in government. The Coalition described the mechanism as a “carbon tax” and removing it was a key policy platform during the 2013 election.(You can read more about the Coalition's policy to remove the carbon price here. )

The carbon pricing mechanism commenced on 1 July 2012.(For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website. ) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon is fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market, though the Labor Government did announce plans to bring this forward to 1 July 2014 just before they were defeated by the Coalition in the 2013 election.

This is the second time that this package of bills has been introduced, after they were rejected in the Senate during the third reading stage the first time round.(See that division here.)

The other related bills that were introduced along with the Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 (No. 2) are:

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

9th Jul 2014, 9:47 AM – Senate Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No. 2] and related bills - Declaration of Urgency - Consider these bills urgent

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An equal number of senators voted in favour of and against a motion moved by Senator Mitch Fifield, which means that the motion was not successful because a majority was not reached.

Senator Fifield's motion was: That these bills be considered urgent bills:

  • Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No. 2]
  • True-up Shortfall Levy (General) (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No. 2]
  • True-up Shortfall Levy (Excise) (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No. 2]
  • Customs Tariff Amendment (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No. 2]
  • Excise Tariff Amendment (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No. 2]
  • Ozone Protection and Synthetic Greenhouse Gas (Import Levy) Amendment (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No.2]
  • Ozone Protection and Synthetic Greenhouse Gas (Import Levy) (Transitional Provisions) Bill 2013 [No. 2]
  • Ozone Protection and Synthetic Greenhouse Gas (Manufacture Levy) Amendment (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No.2]
  • Clean Energy (Income Tax Rates and Other Amendments) Bill 2013 [No. 2]

Background to the bills

The Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 (No. 2) and related bills were introduced to remove the carbon pricing mechanism, which was introduced by the Australian Labor Party while in government. The Coalition described the mechanism as a “carbon tax” and removing it was a key policy platform during the 2013 election.(You can read more about the Coalition's policy to remove the carbon price here. )

The carbon pricing mechanism commenced on 1 July 2012.(For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website. ) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon is fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market, though the Labor Government did announce plans to bring this forward to 1 July 2014 just before they were defeated by the Coalition in the 2013 election.

This is the second time that this package of bills has been introduced, after they were rejected in the Senate during the third reading stage the first time round.(See that division here.)

The other related bills that were introduced along with the Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 (No. 2) are:

Yes No Not passed

7th Jul 2014, 1:29 PM – Senate Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No. 2] and related bills - First Reading - Consider bills together

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The majority voted against a motion "that these bills may be taken together", which had been introduced by Liberal Senator Eric Abetz. This means that each of the related bills will have to be considered separately.

Background to the bills

The Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 (No. 2) and related bills were introduced to remove the carbon pricing mechanism, which was introduced by the Australian Labor Party while in government. The Coalition described the mechanism as a “carbon tax” and removing it was a key policy platform during the 2013 election.(You can read more about the Coalition's policy to remove the carbon price here. )

The carbon pricing mechanism commenced on 1 July 2012.(For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website. ) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon is fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market, though the Labor Government did announce plans to bring this forward to 1 July 2014 just before they were defeated by the Coalition in the 2013 election.

This is the second time that this package of bills has been introduced, after they were rejected in the Senate during the third reading stage the first time round.(See that division here.)

The other related bills that were introduced along with the Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 (No. 2) are:

Yes No Not passed by a small majority

7th Jul 2014, 1:25 PM – Senate Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 [No. 2] and related bills - First Reading - Proceed without formality

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The majority voted against a motion "that these bills may proceed without formality", which was introduced by Liberal Senator Eric Abetz. This means that the motion was unsuccessful.

This motion was attempting "to skip the requirement in the standing orders for different stages to occur on different days".(See the Senators' Guide to Procedure here. ) Because it didn't succeed, these bills will have to follow these requirements.

Background to the bills

The Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 (No. 2) and related bills were introduced to remove the carbon pricing mechanism, which was introduced by the Australian Labor Party while in government. The Coalition described the mechanism as a “carbon tax” and removing it was a key policy platform during the 2013 election.(You can read more about the Coalition's policy to remove the carbon price here. )

The carbon pricing mechanism commenced on 1 July 2012.(For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website. ) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon is fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market, though the Labor Government did announce plans to bring this forward to 1 July 2014 just before they were defeated by the Coalition in the 2013 election.

This is the second time that this package of bills has been introduced, after they were rejected in the Senate during the third reading stage the first time round.(See that division here.)

The other related bills that were introduced along with the Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 (No. 2) are:

Yes No Not passed by a small majority

20th Mar 2014, 12:43 PM – Senate Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 and related bills - Third Reading - Read a third time

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The majority voted against a motion to read the bills for a third time, which was introduced by Liberal Senator Mathias Cormann.

This means that the majority disagreed with the bills and did not want to pass them through the Senate,(Read more about this division on ABC News. ) meaning that the bills will not proceed to become law.

Background to the bills

The Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 and related bills were introduced as a package to remove the carbon pricing mechanism, which was introduced by the Australian Labor Party while in government. The Coalition described the mechanism as a “carbon tax” and removing it was a key policy platform during the 2013 election.(You can read more about the Coalition's policy to remove the carbon price here. )

The carbon pricing mechanism commenced on 1 July 2012.(For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website.) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon is fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market, though the Labor Government did announce plans to bring this forward to 1 July 2014 just before they were defeated by the Coalition in the 2013 election.

The ten other related bills are:

References

Yes No (strong) Not passed by a small majority

17th Mar 2014, 1:59 PM – Senate Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 and related bills - Second Reading - Read a second time

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to read the bill for a second time.(Read more about the stages a bill must pass through here. )

The motion was phrased like this: "That these bills be now read a second time but the Senate calls on the Government to recognise the scientific expert consensus regarding climate change and that the repeal of the carbon tax must be accompanied by the introduction of serious and comprehensive policies to address climate change."

This means that the majority agree with the main idea of the bill, subject to the proviso contained in the motion.

Background to the bills

The Clean Energy Legislation (Carbon Tax Repeal) Bill 2013 and related bills were introduced as a package to remove the carbon pricing mechanism, which was introduced by the Australian Labor Party while in government. The Coalition described the mechanism as a “carbon tax” and removing it was a key policy platform during the 2013 election.(You can read more about the Coalition's policy to remove the carbon price here. )

The carbon pricing mechanism commenced on 1 July 2012.(For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website.) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon is fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market, though the Labor Government did announce plans to bring this forward to 1 July 2014 just before they were defeated by the Coalition in the 2013 election.

The ten other related bills are:

Yes No (strong) Passed by a large majority

3rd Mar 2014, 12:39 PM – Senate Climate Change Authority (Abolition) Bill 2013 - Second reading - Read a second time

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The majority voted against a motion to read the bill for a second time.(Read more about this division in the Australian. )

This means that the majority of senators disagree with the main idea of the bill, which was to abolish the Climate Change Authority, and that the bill has been rejected.

Background to the motion

The Climate Change Authority (Abolition) Bill 2013 was introduced to abolish the Climate Change Authority ('CCA'), which was established by the Labor government to provide independent advice on Australia’s emissions reduction targets, and other Australian Government climate change initiatives.(Read more about the CCA on its website here. It was created by the Climate Change Authority Bill 2011. )

Abolishing the CCA is a key Coalition policy.(Read more in the media.)

Yes No Not passed by a small majority

3rd Mar 2014, 12:35 PM – Senate Climate Change Authority (Abolition) Bill 2013 - Second reading - Express concern about abolition

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The majority voted in favour of a motion introduced by Labor Senator Louise Pratt that:

At the end of the motion to read the bill for a second time, add: “, but the Senate expresses concern over the impact of the abolition of the Climate Change Authority on the provision of independent advice to Government and the public on carbon pollution reduction targets and actions.”

This amendment doesn't change the effect of the amended motion and so is more of a symbolic move to show the majority of senator's dissatisfaction with the Climate Change Authority (Abolition) Bill 2013.

Background to the motion

This bill was introduced to abolish the Climate Change Authority ('CCA'), which was established by the Labor government to provide independent advice on Australia’s emissions reduction targets, and other Australian Government climate change initiatives.(Read more about the CCA on its website here. It was created by the Climate Change Authority Bill 2011. )

Abolishing the CCA is a key Coalition policy.(Read more in the media.)

No Yes Passed by a small majority

How "voted very strongly against" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 9 0 450
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 10 0 100
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 1 1 2
Total: 1 552

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 1 / 552 = 0.18%.

And then