How Trish Crossin voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should use the wealth generated by mining for the benefit of Australian citizens, as encouraged by the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) Principles

Division Trish Crossin Supporters vote Division outcome

22nd Mar 2012, 1:29 PM – Senate Motions - Mining - Use Queensland mining wealth to benefit all Queenslanders

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Queensland Greens Senator Larissa Waters. The motion asked that the proceeds of the Minerals Resource Rent Tax should benefit all Queenslanders and not just the mining industry.

Wording of the motion

That the Senate—

(a) notes a current report by The Australia Institute, which finds:

(i) the mining boom in Queensland is likely to destroy one non-mining job for every two mining jobs it creates, with the loss of at least 20 000 jobs should all 39 resource projects analysed proceed, and

(ii) the reality of the mining boom for the 99 per cent of Queenslanders who do not work in the mining industry is higher housing costs, higher mortgage interest rates and fewer jobs in tourism, manufacturing and agriculture,

(b) further notes the statements of the National Secretary of the CFMEU [Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union] on 19 March 2012 to the effect that:

(i) the strength of the mining industry is driving up the Australian dollar to unprecedented levels and across the country Australia's manufacturing sector is under too much strain, and thousands of jobs are being lost in the finance sector too, and

(ii) Australians outside the mining industry are doing it tough because of the impact of the mining industry on the economy, causing a lot of unhappiness; and

(c) calls on the Government to:

(i) assess the real impacts of the mining boom on Queensland communities and the state's economy, and

(ii) reassess its decision to use proceeds of the Minerals Resource Rent Tax to fund infrastructure which will benefit the mining industry instead of benefiting Queenslanders through investment in initiatives such as national dental care, education funding, national disability insurance scheme, high speed rail and a sovereign wealth fund.

No Yes (strong) Not passed by a modest majority

How "voted very strongly against" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 1 0 50
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 0 0 0
Total: 0 50

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 0 / 50 = 0.0%.

And then