How Jenny McAllister voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should not put asylum seeker children into immigration detention and should release all children now in detention

Division Jenny McAllister Supporters vote Division outcome

26th Nov 2018, 3:42 PM – Senate Motions - Universal Children's Day - Children in detention

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The majority voted in favour of a motion introduced by Labor Senator Anne Urquhart (Tas), which means it succeeded. Motions like these don't make any legal changes on their own but are politically influential because they represent the will of the Senate.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) observes that 20 November 2018 is Universal Children's Day, commemorating the UN General Assembly's same-day adoption of the 1958 Declaration of the Rights of the Child, and the 1989 Convention on the Rights of the Child ('Children's Convention');

(b) acknowledges the work of UNICEF Australia and other stakeholders involved in the Australian Child Rights Taskforce's Children's Report and its recommendations;

(c) notes:

(i) that Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children continue to experience disadvantage,

(ii) the report and recommendations of the Royal Commission into the Protection and Detention of Children in the Northern Territory,

(iii) that children in Australia face growing issues of intergenerational inequality,

(iv) that no child under Australia's care should suffer harm, and

(v) that refugee children under Australia's care have been languishing in indefinite detention on Nauru for over five years;

(d) invites the Morrison Government to take steps to improve Australia's adherence to the Children's Convention; and

(e) calls on the Morrison Government to accept New Zealand's resettlement offer and get the children off Nauru.

Yes Yes Passed by a small majority

17th Oct 2018, 4:13 PM – Senate Motions - Immigration Detention - Remove children from Nauru

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Nick McKim (Tas), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

...

(c) calls on the Federal Government to immediately bring every child in detention on Nauru to Australia for urgent medical and psychological assessment and treatment, along with the family members of children being assessed and treated.

absent Yes Not passed by a modest majority

17th Oct 2018, 4:09 PM – Senate Motions - Immigration Detention - Congratulating Liberal members for stance against children in detention

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The majority voted in favour of a motion introduced by Greens Senator Nick McKim (Tas), which means it succeeded. Motions like these don't make legal changes themselves but can be politically influential as they represent the will of the Senate.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes:

(i) that there are currently around 100 children being detained by the Australian Government on Nauru,

(ii) that many, if not all of these children, are suffering serious psychological disorders, such as 'resignation syndrome', where children abandon all hopes of a better life, and become suicidal,

(iii) that the Australian Medical Association has called on the Government for "urgent action to prevent further harm to the health and welfare of child refugees and asylum seekers on Nauru, [and that] these children and their families be removed from harm and have access to healthcare of an appropriate standard",

(iv) that nearly 6 000 doctors have signed an open letter to the Prime Minister, Mr Morrison, supporting this call from the Australian Medical Association,

(v) Mr Broadbent's statement that "This is an embarrassing humanitarian crisis that the government needs to resolve in a manner acceptable to the Australian people",

(vi) Mr Laundy's statement that "something must be done as soon as possible",

(vii) Ms Banks' statement that this change-of-heart "comes from the hearts and minds of the Australian people", and

(viii) the agreement of these three Liberal MPs that "these kids have been there far too long";

(b) congratulates and thanks the brave Liberal members who told the Government their focus is only on the welfare of the children; ...

Yes Yes Passed by a small majority

6th Dec 2017, 4:13 PM – Senate Motions - Human Rights Day - Refugee resettlement and children

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The majority voted in favour of a motion, introduced by Senator Stirling Griff (SA) and amended by Senator Kim Carr (Vic). Although motions like these don't make any legal changes, they are politically influential as they represent the will of the Senate.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) acknowledges that 10 December 2017 is Human Rights Day which represents the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Rights, adopted by the United Nations General Assembly which established the equal dignity and worth of every person;

(b) recognises that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights represents a milestone document in the history of human rights which proclaimed the inalienable rights that everyone is inherently entitled to as a human being, regardless of race, colour, religion, sex, language, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status;

(c) observes that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was drafted by representatives of diverse legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world and sets out universal values and a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations;

(d) notes that:

(i) children, as well as adults, have human rights and children also have the right to special protection because of their vulnerability to exploitation and abuse,

(ii) December also commemorates Australia's ratification of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child in 1990, and

(iii) Australia's ratification of the Convention on the Rights of the Child means that Australia has a duty to ensure that all children in its care enjoy the rights set out in the treaty;

(e) further notes that:

(i) it has been over three years since the publication of The Forgotten Children report. The report revealed that the prolonged, mandatory detention of asylum seeker children causes them significant mental and physical illness and developmental delays, and

(ii) refugee children should not be detained in offshore processing centres for prolonged periods and should be resettled in third countries as soon as possible; and

(f) calls on the Turnbull Government to immediately accept New Zealand's offer to resettle refugees from Manus Island and Nauru and begin negotiating appropriate conditions, similar to the United States refugee resettlement agreement, to ensure people smugglers do not exploit vulnerable people and eligible refugees, particularly women and children, are resettled in third countries as soon as possible.

Yes Yes Passed by a small majority

25th Jun 2015, 5:02 PM – Senate Migration Amendment (Regional Processing Arrangements) Bill 2015 - in Committee - Detention of children

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The majority voted against two Greens amendments that were introduced by Senator Sarah Hanson-Young (SA).

What do the amendments do?

Senator Hanson-Young explained that the amendments related "to stopping children that are here in Australia being sent to Nauru for further detention". They also required children already in regional detention to be returned to Australia "as soon as reasonably practicable" (see full text below).

Amendment text

Amendment (1) from sheet 7738:

(1) Clause 2, page 2, at the end of the table, add:

3. Schedule 2 The day after this Act receives the Royal Assent.

Amendment (7) from sheet 7738:

(7) Page 4 (after line 5), at the end of the Bill, add:

Schedule 2—Detention of vulnerable persons

Migration Act 1958

1 Subsection 198AD(1)

Omit "sections 198AE, 198AF and 198AG", substitute "sections 198AE, 198AF, 198AG and 198AGA".

2 After section 198AG

Insert:

198AGA Vulnerable persons

(1) Section 198AD does not apply to an unauthorised maritime arrival if the person is a vulnerable person for the purpose of subsection (2).

(2) A person is a vulnerable person for the purpose of this subsection if:

(a) the person is aged under 18; or

(b) the person is the parent or guardian (or other family member) of a person covered by paragraph (a).

3 Application

The amendments to the Migration Act 1958 made by this Schedule apply in relation to an unauthorised maritime arrival on or after the day on which this Schedule commences.

4 Transitional—vulnerable persons transferred before Royal Assent

(1) This item applies to a person if:

(a) the person was an unauthorised maritime arrival at any time on or after 13 August 2012; and

(b) the person was taken from Australia to a regional processing country in accordance with subsection 198AD(2) of the Migration Act 1958; and

(c) at the time the person was taken to the regional processing country the person was:

(i) aged under 18; or

(ii) the parent or guardian (or other family member) of a person covered by subparagraph (i); and

(d) on the day this Act receives the Royal Assent, the person is:

(i) aged under 18; or

(ii) the parent or guardian (or other family member) of a person covered by subparagraph (i).

(2) As soon as reasonably practicable, an officer must ensure the person is removed from the regional processing country and returned to Australia.

absent Yes Not passed by a modest majority

How "voted strongly for" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 3 30 30
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 2 2 4
Total: 32 34

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 32 / 34 = 94%.

And then