How David Leyonhjelm voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should increase the Newstart Allowance rate to ensure that it covers basic living costs

Division David Leyonhjelm Supporters vote Division outcome

4th Dec 2018, 4:10 PM – Senate Motions - Newstart Allowance - Increase

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Rachel Siewert, which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) the buying power of Newstart has barely changed since 1994-95, while the buying power of the median household disposable income has increased 55% during the same period,

(ii) since 2006, successive governments have made cuts to income support for sole parents moving them onto Newstart when their youngest child turns 8,

(iii) the ACOSS and UNSW Poverty in Australia 2018 report revealed that the poverty rate for people on Newstart has risen by 17% in the last 16 years, and

(iv) the cumulative effect of the policy changes since 2006 has left sole parents still on Parenting Payment Single, with two younger children, nearly $85 a fortnight worse off; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to increase Newstart and to reverse the policy changes that have left sole parents worse off.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

12th Nov 2018, 4:57 PM – Senate Motions - Anti-Poverty Week - Increase Newstart & Youth Allowance

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The majority voted against part of a motion introduced by Greens Senator Rachel Siewert (WA), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

[...]

(c) calls on the Federal Government to increase Newstart and Youth Allowance by $75 a week.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

16th Oct 2018, 4:26 PM – Senate Motions - Taxation - Increase Newstart

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Party Senator Richard Di Natale, which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) a company with a turnover of $50 million a year is not a small business,

(ii) corporate profits hit a record $335 billion, up 10 per cent in a year, while wages are at all time lows of 2 per cent, and

(iii) spending $3 billion on more company tax cuts will not reduce economic inequality and low wage growth; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to instead reinvest that money into lifting Newstart for the first time since 1994, when it was lifted by just $2 a week.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

18th Sep 2018, 4:53 PM – Senate Motions - Newstart - Increase

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Independent Senator Tim Storer (SA), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) the Newstart payment has barely increased in real terms in the past 24 years,

(ii) nearly half of Newstart recipients have been on their respective payments for at least two years, and more than 15% for at least five years,

(iii) the Business Council of Australia has stated that 'we need a robust and targeted welfare safety net that ensures displaced workers don't fall into poverty while finding their feet. This could include increasing the inadequate Newstart allowance', and

(iv) a report released in September 2018 by Deloitte Access Economics, commissioned by the Australian Council of Social Service, found that increasing a range of allowance payments, including Newstart, by $75 a week would:

(A) increase the size of the economy by $4 billion a year from an initial injection of $3 billion a year, this being a conservative appraisal of the size and life of the prosperity dividend flowing from the increase,

(B) see the lowest quintile receive 28 times the relative boost to its disposable incomes, providing a tightly targeted fairness impact, with the bulk of relative improvements in disposal incomes overwhelmingly going to Australia's lowest income families, and

(C) increase regional income per head to the least well-off districts across Australia, meaning that regional communities most in need of help would receive it; and

(b) urges the Government to immediately increase Newstart by $75 a week to generate the above prosperity and fairness impacts.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

16th Aug 2018, 12:32 PM – Senate Motions - Newstart - Increase rate

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Rachel Siewert (WA), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate:

(a) acknowledges the release of the Australian Council of Social Service and UNSW Sydney report, Inequality in Australia 2018;

(b) recognises that the report found that wealth inequality is increasing and, with regards to income inequality, someone in the top 1 per cent of the income scale earns more in a fortnight than someone in the lowest 5 per cent earns in a year;

(c) acknowledges that our social safety net currently fails to protect those seeking work from falling into poverty;

(d) notes that the Australian Council of Social Service calls for an increase of $75 a week to allowance payments for single people from 1 January 2019; and

(e) urges the Federal Government to increase the single rate of Newstart and related allowances by $75 a week.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

20th Jun 2018, 11:40 AM – Senate Treasury Laws Amendment (Personal Income Tax Plan) Bill 2018 - Second Reading - Raise minimum wage, Newstart and Youth Allowance

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Victorian Senator Richard Di Natale, which means it failed.

Motion text

At the end of the motion, add:

", but the Senate is of the opinion that:

(a) the bill should not be considered until the minimum wage is lifted to 60% of the median wage, and Newstart, Youth Allowance and related allowances are increased by $75 a week; and

(b) the revenue used to fund the government's Tax Cut Plan should be invested in health and education services, public infrastructure and the social safety net, instead of being used to fund tax cuts."

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

10th May 2018, 12:10 PM – Senate Motions - Pensions and Benefits - Increase single rate of Newstart and Youth Allowance

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by the Greens Senator Rachel Siewert (WA), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) recognises that single rates of unemployment payments are completely inadequate to cover basic living costs;

(b) acknowledges that our social safety net currently fails to protect jobseekers from falling into poverty;

(c) notes that:

(i) the Australian Council of Social Service has called for an increase of $75 a week to allowance payments for single people from 1 January 2019, and

(ii) the 2018-19 Budget did not increase any allowance payments, including Newstart or Youth Allowance; and

(d) urges the Federal Government to increase the single rate of Newstart and Youth Allowance by $75 a week.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

15th Feb 2018 – Senate Motions - Newstart Allowance - Increase rate

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The majority voted against this motion, which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes the Budget Priorities Statement 2018-19 of the Australian Council of Social Service launched this week in Canberra;

(b) recognises that research, from 2017, shows that single rates of unemployment payments are completely inadequate to cover basic living costs;

(c) acknowledges that our social safety net currently fails to protect those seeking work from falling into poverty;

(d) notes that the Australian Council of Social Service calls for an increase of $75 a week to allowance payments for single people from 1 January 2019; and

(e) urges the Federal Government to increase the single rate of Newstart and related allowances by $75 a week.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

14th Aug 2017, 10:08 AM – Senate Social Security Amendment (Caring for People on Newstart) Bill 2017 - Second Reading - Agree with the bill's main idea

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The majority voted against a motion to agree with the bill's main idea. In parliamentary jargon, they voted against reading the bill for a second time. This means that the bill has been rejected and won't be considered any further.

What was the bill's main idea?

The bill was introduced to increase the single rate of newstart and single independent rate of youth allowance by $110 a week.

No Yes (strong) Not passed by a modest majority

14th Oct 2015, 3:51 PM – Senate Motions - Anti-Poverty Week - Address poverty

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The majority voted against this motion, which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) the week beginning 11 October 2015 is Anti-Poverty Week,

(ii) the main aims of Anti-Poverty Week are to strengthen public understanding, and encourage research, discussion and action to address these problems, and

(iii) poverty and severe hardship affect more than a million Australians;

(b) acknowledges the very important work undertaken by a large number of organisations across Australia in providing crucial services, such as food-banks, housing, social services, counselling and legal support among others, which make an invaluable contribution to Australian society; and

(c) calls on the government to:

(i) increase Newstart and youth allowance payments by at least $50 a week,

(ii) provide adequate support to people struggling with poverty, including young people accessing income support,

(iii) provide appropriate support to service delivery agencies, including stable and adequate funding, and

(iv) develop a national anti-poverty plan with clear targets and measures to address poverty in Australia.

absent Yes Not passed by a modest majority

How "voted very strongly against" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 1 0 50
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 8 0 80
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 1 1 2
Total: 1 132

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 1 / 132 = 0.76%.

And then