How Brian Burston voted compared to someone who believes that Members of Parliament (MPs) and Senators should vote to speed things along by supporting motions to 'put the question' (known as 'closure' or 'gag' motions), which require Parliament to immediately vote on a question rather than debating it any further

Division Brian Burston Supporters vote Division outcome

19th Oct 2017, 12:45 PM – Senate Regulations and Determinations - Citizenship (Authorisation) Revocation and Authorisation Instrument 2017 and another; Disallowance - Speed things along

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The majority voted against a motion to speed things along. In parliamentary jargon, they voted against putting the question.

absent Yes (strong) Not passed by a small majority

19th Oct 2017, 11:42 AM – Senate Environment and Infrastructure Legislation Amendment (Stop Adani) Bill 2017 - Second Reading - Speed things along

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The majority voted against speeding things along. In parliamentary jargon, they voted against a motion to put the question. Because this motion was unsuccessful, debate continued.

absent Yes (strong) Not passed by a large majority

1st Dec 2016, 8:42 PM – Senate Superannuation (Departing Australia Superannuation Payments Tax) Amendment Bill (No. 2) 2016 - Third Reading - Speed things along

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The majority voted in favour of speeding things along. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to "put the question".

Yes Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

1st Dec 2016, 8:38 PM – Senate Superannuation (Departing Australia Superannuation Payments Tax) Amendment Bill (No. 2) 2016 - Second Reading - Speed things along

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The majority voted in favour of speeding things along. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to "put the question".

Yes Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

1st Dec 2016, 8:30 PM – Senate Income Tax Rates Amendment (Working Holiday Maker Reform) Bill 2016 (No. 2) - Third Reading - Speeding things along

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The majority voted in favour of speeding things along. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to "put the question".

Yes Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

How "voted moderately for" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 3 150 150
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
MP absent 10 250 500
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 1 10 10
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 0 0 0
Total: 410 660

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 410 / 660 = 62%.

And then