How Katy Gallagher voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should reduce personal income tax rates in Australia

Division Katy Gallagher Supporters vote Division outcome

4th Jul 2019, 5:39 PM – Senate Treasury Laws Amendment (Tax Relief So Working Australians Keep More of Their Money) Bill 2019 - Second Reading - Agree with the bill's main idea

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to agree with the main idea of the bill. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to read the bill for a second time. This means that the Senate can now discuss the bill in more detail.

What is the bill's main idea?

The bill was introduced to introduce further reductions in personal income tax rates, which were announced in the 2019–20 Budget. Specifically, it:

  • increases the base and maximum amounts of the low and middle income tax offset to $255 and $1080, respectively, for the 2018-19, 2019-20, 2020-21 and 2021-22 financial years;
  • increases the maximum amount of the low income tax offset from $645 to $700 from the 2022-23 financial year; and
  • reduces the tax payable by individuals from the 2022-23 financial year by increasing the top threshold of the 19 per cent income tax bracket from $41 000 to $45 000, and from the 2024-25 financial year by reducing the 32.5 per cent income tax rate to 30 per cent.

Read more in the bills digest.

Yes Yes (strong) Passed by a large majority

4th Jul 2019 – Senate Treasury Laws Amendment (Tax Relief So Working Australians Keep More of Their Money) Bill 2019 - Third Reading - Pass the bill

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to pass the bill in the Senate. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to read the bill for a third time. Since the bill was already passed in the House of Representatives, this vote means that it will now become law.

What does the bill do?

The bill was introduced to introduce further reductions in personal income tax rates, which were announced in the 2019–20 Budget. Specifically, it:

  • increases the base and maximum amounts of the low and middle income tax offset to $255 and $1080, respectively, for the 2018-19, 2019-20, 2020-21 and 2021-22 financial years;
  • increases the maximum amount of the low income tax offset from $645 to $700 from the 2022-23 financial year; and
  • reduces the tax payable by individuals from the 2022-23 financial year by increasing the top threshold of the 19 per cent income tax bracket from $41 000 to $45 000, and from the 2024-25 financial year by reducing the 32.5 per cent income tax rate to 30 per cent.

Read more in the bills digest.

Yes Yes (strong) Passed by a large majority

How "voted very strongly for" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 2 100 100
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 0 0 0
Total: 100 100

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 100 / 100 = 100%.

And then