How Tim Hammond voted compared to someone who believes that Members of Parliament (MPs) and Senators should vote to speed things along by supporting motions to 'put the question' (known as 'closure' or 'gag' motions), which require Parliament to immediately vote on a question rather than debating it any further

Division Tim Hammond Supporters vote Division outcome

8th Feb 2018, 10:51 AM – Representatives Treasury Laws Amendment (Enterprise Tax Plan No. 2) Bill 2017 - Third Reading - Put the question

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion to speed things along. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to put the question, which means they'll now stop debating and instead immediately vote on the question.

About the bill

The purpose of the bill is to:

progressively extend the lower 27.5 per cent corporate tax rate to all corporate tax entities by the 2023-24 financial year; and further reduce the corporate tax rate in stages so that by the 2026 27 financial year, the corporate tax rate for all entities will be 25 per cent

Read more in the bills digest.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

4th Dec 2017, 3:33 PM – Representatives National Disability Insurance Scheme Amendment (Quality and Safeguards Commission and Other Measures) Bill 2017 - Consideration of Senate Message - Speed things along

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of voting on the matter immediately. In parliamentary jargon, they voted in favour of putting the question rather than debating it any further.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

26th Oct 2017, 3:02 PM – Representatives Motions - Minister for Employment - Speed things along

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion to speed things along. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to put the question.

absent Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

25th Oct 2017, 6:07 PM – Representatives Criminal Code Amendment (Firearms Trafficking) Bill 2017 - Third Reading - Speed things along

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion to speed things along. In parliamentary jargon, they voted in put the question so that they could vote on the matter they were discussing immediately rather than speaking more about it.

absent Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

14th Sep 2017, 12:31 PM – Representatives Motions - Leader of the Opposition - Speed things along

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion to speed things along. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to 'put the question', which means debate will stop and a vote will happen immediately.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

13th Sep 2017, 6:19 PM – Representatives Higher Education Support Legislation Amendment (A More Sustainable, Responsive and Transparent Higher Education System) Bill 2017 - Second Reading - Speed things along

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of speeding things along. In parliamentary jargon, they voted "That the question be now put". This type of motion forces the House to vote on the matter immediately rather than debating anymore.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

15th Aug 2017, 4:59 PM – Representatives Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Amendment Bill 2017 - Second Reading - Speed things along

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion to "put" the question. In other words, they voted to stop debate on this subject and just take the vote already.

The debate related to a motion criticising the Government's actions on the Great Barrier Reef, which was subsequently voted on.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

15th Aug 2017 – Representatives Petroleum and Other Fuels Reporting Bill 2017 and another - Third Reading - Speed things along

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion:

That so much of standing orders be suspended as would prevent the motion for the third reading being moved without delay.

A "motion for a third reading" is the last vote that needs to happen in a house of Parliament before the bill can pass that house, so it's really just a vote on whether or not to pass a bill.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

21st Jun 2017, 9:47 AM – Representatives Motions - Workplace Relations - Speed things along

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion to speed things along. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to "put the question", which means debate has to stop and the question needs to be voted on immediately.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

19th Jun 2017, 4:35 PM – Representatives Medicare Guarantee Bill 2017, Medicare Guarantee (Consequential Amendments) Bill 2017 - Second Reading - Speed things along

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of speeding things along, which means they'll stop discussing the matter and vote on it immediately. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to put the question.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

29th May 2017, 7:25 PM – Representatives Australian Education Amendment Bill 2017 - Third Reading - Speed things along

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion to speed things along. In other words, they wanted to voted immediately on whether to pass the bill (and so end the third reading stage) rather than debating it for longer. Because this vote was successful, debate ended and the House immediately voted.

These sorts of motions are known as 'closure' or 'gag' motions and in parliamentary jargon, they are motions 'to put the question'.

What is this bill all about?

The bill was introduced to implement the Coalition Government's new school funding proposal. Unfortunately, at the time of this vote there was still no bills digest to explain exactly what the new proposal is, but there is a very helpful and easy to understand explanation on The Conversation by Associate Professor Misty Adoniou. As a brief summary:

  • the proposal offers more money for schools, but less than the previous Labor Government had offered;
  • every student will attract the same amount of funding but the amount of funding that the federal government will provide (as opposed to the state governments) is not equal between government and non-government schools (that is, the federal government will provide 80% of the funding for non-government schools but only 20% for government schools, with the states paying the difference);
  • those in need will get more funding, but the Government still doesn't have any proposal for how this will work or even how many students will be eligible for this, which leaves a big question mark over the whole proposal.

How are schools currently funded?

ABC News has created a handily jargon-free summary of how Australian schools are funded.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

29th May 2017, 7:17 PM – Representatives Australian Education Amendment Bill 2017 - Third Reading - Speed things along

Show detail

The majority voted on a motion to speed things along by voting on the question immediately rather than debating any further. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to "put the question". In this case, the question was whether to suspend the normal parliamentary rules so that they could decide whether to pass the bill immediately.

These sorts of motions are known as 'closure' or 'gag' motions.

What is this bill all about?

The bill was introduced to implement the Coalition Government's new school funding proposal. Unfortunately, at the time of this vote there was still no bills digest to explain exactly what the new proposal is, but there is a very helpful and easy to understand explanation on The Conversation by Associate Professor Misty Adoniou. As a brief summary:

  • the proposal offers more money for schools, but less than the previous Labor Government had offered;
  • every student will attract the same amount of funding but the amount of funding that the federal government will provide (as opposed to the state governments) is not equal between government and non-government schools (that is, the federal government will provide 80% of the funding for non-government schools but only 20% for government schools, with the states paying the difference);
  • those in need will get more funding, but the Government still doesn't have any proposal for how this will work or even how many students will be eligible for this, which leaves a big question mark over the whole proposal.

How are schools currently funded?

ABC News has created a handily jargon-free summary of how Australian schools are funded.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

22nd Mar 2017, 11:17 AM – Representatives Family Assistance Legislation Amendment (Jobs for Families Child Care Package) Bill 2016 - Second Reading - Speed things along

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion to speed things along. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to put the motion of whether to agree with the main idea of the bill immediately, which is what happened.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

22nd Mar 2017, 9:49 AM – Representatives Motions - Racial Discrimination Act 1975 - Speed things along

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of speeding things along. In other words, they voted to decide on Leader of the Opposition Bill Shorten's motion immediately rather than discussing it anymore.

Motion text

That the motion be put.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

16th Feb 2017, 12:55 PM – Representatives Native Title Amendment (Indigenous Land Use Agreements) Bill 2017 - Third Reading - Speed things along

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of having the vote on whether to pass the bill immediately. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to suspend standing orders, which would normally require a certain period of time to pass before the House can vote on whether to pass the bill.

Because of this vote, there will be no more discussion of the bill in the House, which is why votes like this are sometimes called 'gags'.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

16th Feb 2017, 9:48 AM – Representatives Motions — Native Title Amendment (Indigenous Land Use Agreements) Bill 2017 - That the motion be put

Show detail
No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

14th Feb 2017, 7:17 PM – Representatives Building and Construction Industry (Improving Productivity) Amendment Bill 2017 - Third Reading - Put the question

Show detail

This is a motion to 'put the question'. Members of Parliament (MPs) who vote in favour of putting the question are really voting in favour of speeding things along. In other words, they want to stop talking about a question and just vote on it already.

These types of motions are sometimes known as 'gag' motions, since they stop debate.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

1st Dec 2016, 6:51 PM – Representatives Resolutions of the Senate - Financial Services; Consideration of Senate Message - Speed things along

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion to speed things along.

Motion text

That the question be now put.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

1st Dec 2016, 4:33 PM – Representatives Income Tax Rates Amendment (Working Holiday Maker Reform) Bill 2016 (No. 2) - Consideration of Senate Message - Speed things along

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion to speed things along.

Motion text

That the question be now put.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

1st Dec 2016, 9:52 AM – Representatives Motions - Taxation - Put the motion

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of "putting the motion". In other words, they voted to ask the question immediately rather than discussing it any further.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

10th Nov 2016, 12:44 PM – Representatives Migration Legislation Amendment (Regional Processing Cohort) Bill 2016 - Second Reading - Put the motion

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of speeding things along and having the vote on a particular motion immediately rather than discussing it any further.

What was the motion that they were discussing?

Independent MP Andrew Wilkie introduced the motion and both Independent MP Cathy McGowan and Greens MP Adam Bandt supported it.

It was that:

'the House declines to give the bill a second reading and instead:

(1) acknowledges that the global refugee crisis is for Australia a humanitarian challenge and not a border security problem;

(2) notes that Australia's response to asylum seekers will inevitably require a genuinely regional solution involving most, if not all south-east Asian countries, as well as Australia and New Zealand, and be approved by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees;

(3) insists that Australia's response to asylum seekers be consistent with all of our international treaty obligations including the Refugee Convention, the Rome Statute, the Convention on the Rights of the Child and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights; and

*(4) calls on the Government to develop and implement a sophisticated policy response to this challenge that as far as possible deals with the situation in source countries, countries of first asylum and transit countries.' *

Who supported the motion?

When the vote on whether to agree to the motion was taken, only MPs Wilkie, McGowan and Bandt voted in favour of it. Since there has to be at least five MPs on either side of the vote for an official division to be recorded, the result of the vote was recorded in Votes and Proceedings but not in Hansard and, therefore, not on They Vote For You.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

7th Nov 2016, 2:53 PM – Representatives Motions - Prime Minister - Put the question

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of speeding things along and having the vote on a particular motion immediately rather than discussing it any further.

Motion text

That the motion be put.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

7th Nov 2016, 1:00 PM – Representatives Motions - Turnbull Government - Put the motion

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of speeding things along and having the vote on a particular motion immediately rather than discussing it any further.

Motion text

The question is that the motion be put.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

20th Oct 2016, 2:57 PM – Representatives Motions - Prime Minister; Attempted Censure - Put the question

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion to vote on the question being discussed now and not debating anymore.

Motion text

The question is that the motion be put.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

20th Oct 2016, 1:03 PM – Representatives Plebiscite (Same-Sex Marriage) Bill 2016 - Second Reading - Speed things along

Show detail
No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

18th Oct 2016, 3:15 PM – Representatives Motions - Gun Control - Speed things along

Show detail

Motion text

That the question be put.

In other words, stop debating and vote on the question before the House.

absent Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

17th Oct 2016, 7:42 PM – Representatives Treasury Laws Amendment (Working Holiday Maker Reform) Bill 2016 - Third Reading - Put the question

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion to vote on whether to pass the bill now rather than continuing to debate.

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

How "voted strongly against" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 24 0 1200
MP absent 3 75 150
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 0 0 0
Total: 75 1350

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 75 / 1350 = 5.6%.

And then