How Bruce Scott voted compared to someone who believes that asylum seekers who arrive in Australia without a visa, particularly those who arrive by boat, should have their asylum claims processed regionally in a country such as the Republic of Nauru or Papua New Guinea (See the policy "For offshore processing of asylum seekers" for more on processing asylum seeker claims in Australian territories like Christmas Island)

Division Bruce Scott Supporters vote Division outcome

27th Jun 2012, 7:57 PM – Representatives Migration Legislation Amendment (The Bali Process) Bill 2012 - Third Reading - Read a third time

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to read the bill for a third time.

This means that the bill is now passed in the House of Representatives and will now be sent to the Senate for their consideration.

Background to Bill

The bill was introduced by Independent MP Rob Oakeshott in response to the High Court's decision in Plaintiff M70/2011 v Minister for Immigration and Citizenship [2011] HCA 32, which put an end to the Labor Government's Malaysia Solution policy.(Read more about the decision on Wikipedia here and on ABC News here. Read more about the effect of this decision on the Malaysia Solution here. )

To this end, the bill amends the Migration Act 1958 to replace the existing framework for taking offshore entry persons to another country to assess their refugee claims.(More information about this bill and context can be found here.) It also amends the Immigration (Guardianship of Children) Act 1946 in relation to making and implementing any decision to remove, deport or take a non-citizen child from Australia. However, these amendments would only have effect for a period of 12 months.

By making these amendments, the bill attempts to codify the Bali Process into domestic law.

References

No Yes Passed by a small majority

27th Jun 2012, 7:52 PM – Representatives Migration Legislation Amendment (The Bali Process) Bill 2012 - Consideration in Detail - Agree to the bill

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to agree to the bill as amended.

This means that the the bill can now progress to the third reading stage.

Background to Bill

The bill was introduced by Independent MP Rob Oakeshott in response to the High Court's decision in Plaintiff M70/2011 v Minister for Immigration and Citizenship [2011] HCA 32, which put an end to the Labor Government's Malaysia Solution policy.(Read more about the decision on Wikipedia here and on ABC News here. Read more about the effect of this decision on the Malaysia Solution here. )

To this end, the bill amends the Migration Act 1958 to replace the existing framework for taking offshore entry persons to another country to assess their refugee claims.(More information about this bill and context can be found here.) It also amends the Immigration (Guardianship of Children) Act 1946 in relation to making and implementing any decision to remove, deport or take a non-citizen child from Australia. However, these amendments would only have effect for a period of 12 months.

By making these amendments, the bill attempts to codify the Bali Process into domestic law.

References

No Yes Passed by a small majority

27th Jun 2012, 7:36 PM – Representatives Migration Legislation Amendment (The Bali Process) Bill 2012 - Consideration in Detail - 12 month limit

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The majority voted in favour of a motion proposed by Independent MP Andrew Wilkie.

The motion was that the amendments in this bill only have effect for a period of 12 months after it commences as an Act.

Someone who votes aye in this division supports this amendment. The majority voted aye in this amendment, so it was successful and is included in this bill.

Background to the bill

The bill was introduced by Independent MP Rob Oakeshott in response to the High Court's decision in Plaintiff M70/2011 v Minister for Immigration and Citizenship [2011] HCA 32, which put an end to the Labor Government's Malaysia Solution policy.(Read more about the decision on Wikipedia here and on ABC News here. Read more about the effect of this decision on the Malaysia Solution here. )

To this end, the bill amends the Migration Act 1958 to replace the existing framework for taking offshore entry persons to another country to assess their refugee claims.(More information about this bill and context can be found here.) It also amends the Immigration (Guardianship of Children) Act 1946 in relation to making and implementing any decision to remove, deport or take a non-citizen child from Australia. However, these amendments would only have effect for a period of 12 months.

By making these amendments, the bill attempts to codify the Bali Process into domestic law.

References

No No Passed by a small majority

31st May 2012, 1:58 PM – Representatives Migration Legislation Amendment (The Bali Process) Bill 2012 - Second Reading - Read a second time

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An equal number of members voted in favour of and against a motion to read the bill for a second time.

However, the motion was ultimately successful because the Deputy Speaker Anna Burke gave her casting vote with the ayes.

This means that the bill was read a second time.

Someone who voted aye (that is, in favour of the bill), agreed with the main idea of the bill.

Background to the bill

The bill was introduced by Independent MP Rob Oakeshott in response to the High Court's decision in Plaintiff M70/2011 v Minister for Immigration and Citizenship [2011] HCA 32, which put an end to the Labor Government's Malaysia Solution policy.(Read more about the decision on Wikipedia here and on ABC News here. Read more about the effect of this decision on the Malaysia Solution here. )

To this end, the bill amends the Migration Act 1958 to replace the existing framework for taking offshore entry persons to another country to assess their refugee claims.(More information about this bill and context can be found here.) It also amends the Immigration (Guardianship of Children) Act 1946 in relation to making and implementing any decision to remove, deport or take a non-citizen child from Australia. However, these amendments would only have effect for a period of 12 months.

By making these amendments, the bill attempts to codify the Bali Process into domestic law.

References

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

10th Aug 2006, 12:57 PM – Representatives Migration Amendment (Designated Unauthorised Arrivals) Bill 2006 - Third Reading - Read a third time

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to agree to the remaining stages of the bill, including the government amendments as circulated.(Read more about the stages that a bill must pass through here. )

This means that the bill is now passed in the House of Representatives and can now be sent to the Senate for their consideration.

Three Liberal Party ministers rebelled and crossed the floor to vote 'no' with the opposition in this division:(Read more about what it means to cross the floor in our FAQ section. ) Russell Broadbent, Petro Georgiou and Judi Moylan.

Background to the bill

The bill was introduced to expand the offshore processing regime(Read more about Australia's offshore processing regime here. ) to include all people arriving at mainland Australia unlawfully by sea on or after 13 April 2006.(Read more about the bill, including its explanatory memoranda, here. For more background, read its bills digest (293 KB).) This means that all such people will be treated as if they had landed in an excised place, meaning an place that is excluded from the migration zone.

References

Yes Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

10th Aug 2006, 12:46 PM – Representatives Migration Amendment (Designated Unauthorised Arrivals) Bill 2006 - Second Reading - Read a second time

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to read the bill for a second time.(Read more about the stages that a bill must pass through here. )

This means that the majority agree with the main idea of the bill.

Three Liberal Party ministers rebelled and crossed the floor to vote 'no' with the opposition in this division:(Read more about what it means to cross the floor in our FAQ section. ) Russell Broadbent, Petro Georgiou and Judi Moylan.

Background to the bill

The bill was introduced to expand the offshore processing regime(Read more about Australia's offshore processing regime here. ) to include all people arriving at mainland Australia unlawfully by sea on or after 13 April 2006.(Read more about the bill, including its explanatory memoranda, here. For more background, read its bills digest (293 KB).) This means that all such people will be treated as if they had landed in an excised place, meaning an place that is excluded from the migration zone.

References

Yes Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

How "voted moderately for" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 3 150 150
MP voted against policy 1 0 50
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 3 30 30
MP voted against policy 2 0 20
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 0 0 0
Total: 180 250

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 180 / 250 = 72%.

And then