How Angus Taylor voted compared to someone who believes that the federal govenment should increase transparency in big business (that is, companies with an income equal or more than $100 million/year or, alternatively, $200 million/year) by making certain information public, including their total income and how much tax they paid

Division Angus Taylor Supporters vote Division outcome

12th Nov 2015, 11:24 AM – Representatives Tax Laws Amendment (Combating Multinational Tax Avoidance) Bill 2015 - Consideration of Senate Message - Disagree with the Senate's amendments

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The majority disagreed with the Senate's amendments to the bill, and so they were rejected from the House of Representatives.

This means that the bill will return to the Senate, where the senators will decide whether or not they are going to insist on their amendments or whether they'll accept the will of the House.

You can explore the amendments as they are listed on the Hansard or on the bill's homepage.

What does the bill do?

The bill strengthens the laws against tax avoidance for certain companies. For example, it introduces anti-avoidance measures to deal with multinational companies with an annual global income of more than $A1 billion that use schemes to avoid having to pay tax in Australia or at least reduce that tax to a minimum.

To learn more about the bill, see the bills digest.

Yes No Passed by a small majority

14th Sep 2015, 6:08 PM – Representatives Tax and Superannuation Laws Amendment (Better Targeting the Income Tax Transparency Laws) Bill 2015 - Second Reading - Agree with the bill's main idea

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The majority agreed with the bill's main idea (in parliamentary jargon, they voted in favour of giving the bill a second reading). This means that the House can now discuss the bill in more detail.

However, in this case, there wasn't any further discussion and the bill was immediately passed in the House (that is, given a third reading). This means it will now be sent to the Senate for them to decide whether to pass it or not.

Bill's main idea

The purpose of the bill is to stop certain tax information of Australian-owned private companies from being made public by the Commissioner of Taxation. In other words, the bill makes sure that the tax information of those companies stays private.

The Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Industry and Science, Karen Andrews MP, argued that this bill "will ensure that there is greater public transparency of the tax affairs of companies but without risking the privacy, personal security and market environments of Australian owned private companies" (see her full speech).

What 'tax information' is currently made public?

Right now, the Commissioner of Taxation publishes some tax information of companies whose total annual income equals or exceeds $100 million. The information published includes the company’s:

  • ABN and name;
  • total annual income;
  • annual taxable income or net income (if any); and
  • annual income tax payable (if any).

See the bills digest for further information.

Background to the bill

The previous Labor Government introduced the requirement to publish this tax information in 2013. The then Assistant Treasurer, David Bradbury MP, announced that it would "encourage enterprises to pay their fair share of tax and discourage aggressive tax minimisation practices" (see his media release).

Yes No Passed by a small majority

14th Sep 2015, 6:00 PM – Representatives Tax and Superannuation Laws Amendment (Better Targeting the Income Tax Transparency Laws) Bill 2015 - Second Reading - Against the bill

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The majority voted against an amendment, which asked the House to reject the main idea of the bill. In parliamentary jargon, the amendment asked the House to not give the bill a second reading. If the amendment had succeeded, then the bill would have failed.

Bill's main idea

The purpose of the bill is to stop certain tax information of Australian-owned private companies from being made public by the Commissioner of Taxation. In other words, the bill makes sure that the tax information of those companies stays private.

The Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Industry and Science, Karen Andrews MP, argued that this bill "will ensure that there is greater public transparency of the tax affairs of companies but without risking the privacy, personal security and market environments of Australian owned private companies" (see her full speech).

What 'tax information' is currently made public?

Right now, the Commissioner of Taxation publishes some tax information of companies whose total annual income equals or exceeds $100 million. The information published includes the company’s:

  • ABN and name;
  • total annual income;
  • annual taxable income or net income (if any); and
  • annual income tax payable (if any).

See the bills digest for further information.

Background to the bill

The previous Labor Government introduced the requirement to publish this tax information in 2013. The then Assistant Treasurer, David Bradbury MP, announced that it would "encourage enterprises to pay their fair share of tax and discourage aggressive tax minimisation practices" (see his media release).

No Yes Not passed by a small majority

How "voted very strongly against" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 3 0 30
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 0 0 0
Total: 0 30

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 0 / 30 = 0.0%.

And then