How Keith Pitt voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should introduce legislation that increases the powers and influence of trade unions in workplace relations

Division Keith Pitt Supporters vote Division outcome

18th Oct 2016, 6:07 PM – Representatives Building and Construction Industry (Improving Productivity) Bill 2013 and one other - Third Reading - Pass the bill

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The majority voted in favour of passing the bills in the House of Representatives. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to read the bills for a third time.

The bills will now be sent to the Senate for their consideration.

What are these bills about?

These bills were first introduced into Parliament back in 2013, and again in 2016. In a nut shell, their purpose is to re-establish the Australian Building and Construction Commission (ABCC).

According to the bills digest:

The purpose of the Building and Construction Industry (Improving Productivity) Bill 2013 (the Bill) is to re‑institute a separate workplace relations framework for the building industry based largely on the Building and Construction Industry Improvement Act 2005 (the BCII Act). Among other things the Bill re-establishes the Australian Building and Construction Commission (ABCC), reintroduces provisions dealing with unlawful industrial action, coercion and the associated civil penalties specific to the building industry, and broadens the application of those provisions to include transporting and supplying of goods to be used in building work.

Yes No Passed by a small majority

4th Feb 2016, 10:39 AM – Representatives Building and Construction Industry (Improving Productivity) Bill 2013 [No. 2] and another - Third Reading - Pass the bills

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The majority agreed to pass the bills, meaning that the bills will now go to the Senate for the senators to consider. In parliamentary jargon, they read the bills for a third time.

What were these bills about?

The bills re-institute a workplace relations framework that was first put in place back in 2005. Among other things, they re-establish the Australian Building and Construction Commissioner and re-introduce provisions dealing with unlawful industrial action and coercion that are specific to the building industry.

Read more in the bills digest.

Yes No Passed by a small majority

4th Feb 2016, 10:20 AM – Representatives Building and Construction Industry (Improving Productivity) Bill 2013 [No. 2] and another - Second Reading - Agree with the bills' main idea

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The majority agreed with the main idea of the bills, meaning that they can now discuss them in more detail. In parliamentary jargon, they read the bills for a second time.

Main idea of the bills

The bills re-institute a workplace relations framework that was first put in place back in 2005. Among other things, they re-establish the Australian Building and Construction Commissioner and re-introduce provisions dealing with unlawful industrial action and coercion that are specific to the building industry.

Read more in the bills digest.

Yes No Passed by a small majority

12th Dec 2013, 5:33 PM – Representatives Building and Construction Industry (Improving Productivity) Bill 2013 - Second Reading - Read a second time

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to read the bill a second time. This means that the majority of MPs agree with the main idea in the bill, which was to re-establish the Australian Building and Construction Commission (‘ABCC’).

The House subsequently agreed to a motion to read the bill for a third time without division. This means that the bill was passed in the House and can now be sent to the Senate for their consideration.

Background to the bill

The ABCC was originally established by the Coalition Government in 2005 in response to the Royal Commission into the Building and Construction Industry, which found that there was “widespread disregard of the rule of law” within the industry.( Summary of Findings and Recommendations (1.9MB). For a more general introduction on the ABCC, see the Wikipedia page. ) The Labor Government abolished the ABCC in 2012.

Re-establishing the ABCC was one of the Liberal Party’s policies going into the 2013 election and the bill reflects this.( Improving the Fair Work Laws policy)

Yes No Passed by a small majority

How "voted very strongly against" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 4 0 40
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 0 0 0
Total: 0 40

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 0 / 40 = 0.0%.

And then