How Bert Van Manen voted compared to someone who believes that people should have to pass a test before they are eligible to become Australian citizens

Division Bert Van Manen Supporters vote Division outcome

14th Aug 2017, 6:00 PM – Representatives Australian Citizenship Legislation Amendment (Strengthening the Requirements for Australian Citizenship and Other Measures) Bill 2017 - Third Reading - Pass the bill

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to pass the bill in the House of Representatives. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to read the bill for a third time. This means that the bill will now be sent to the Senate, where our senators will decide whether they agree with the House that the bill should become law.

What does this bill do?

The bill takes a more restrictive approach to granting Australian citizenship to new applicants. According to the [bills digest]9https://www.aph.gov.au/ParliamentaryBusiness/BillsLegislation/bd/bd1718a/18bd023), the bill:

contains a number of new amendments regarding citizenship policy. For applicants seeking Australian citizenship by conferral, the Bill proposes:

  • an increase in the English language requirement from basic to competent
  • the extension of the general residency requirement to four years of permanent residence
  • the requirement to demonstrate integration into the Australian community
  • the replacement of the pledge of commitment with a proposed pledge of allegiance and
  • changes to the eligibility provisions of the citizenship test.

Other changes made by the bill are discussed at length in the bills digest.

Yes Yes Passed by a small majority

14th Aug 2017, 5:50 PM – Representatives Australian Citizenship Legislation Amendment (Strengthening the Requirements for Australian Citizenship and Other Measures) Bill 2017 - Second Reading - Agree with bill's main idea

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to agree with the bill's main idea. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to read the bill for a second time. This means that they are now able to discuss the bill in greater detail.

What is the bill's main idea?

The bill takes a more restrictive approach to granting Australian citizenship to new applicants. According to the [bills digest]9https://www.aph.gov.au/ParliamentaryBusiness/BillsLegislation/bd/bd1718a/18bd023), the bill:

contains a number of new amendments regarding citizenship policy. For applicants seeking Australian citizenship by conferral, the Bill proposes:

  • an increase in the English language requirement from basic to competent
  • the extension of the general residency requirement to four years of permanent residence
  • the requirement to demonstrate integration into the Australian community
  • the replacement of the pledge of commitment with a proposed pledge of allegiance and
  • changes to the eligibility provisions of the citizenship test.

Other changes made by the bill are discussed at length in the bills digest.

Yes Yes Passed by a small majority

How "voted very strongly for" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 2 20 20
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 0 0 0
Total: 20 20

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 20 / 20 = 100%.

And then