How Peter Slipper voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should introduce a carbon pricing mechanism

Division Peter Slipper Supporters vote Division outcome

12th Oct 2011 – Representatives Clean Energy Bill 2011 and related bills - Third Reading - Read a third time

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion that the bills be read a third time.

This means that the bills were passed in the House of Representatives and will now be sent to the Senate.

The eighteen bills are a package to implement a carbon pricing mechanism,(Read more about the carbon pricing mechanism on the Clean Energy Regulator’s website.) which is a key policy of the Labor Government.

The eighteen bills are:

Background to the bills

The carbon pricing mechanism is set to begin on 1 July 2012. It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It will apply to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon will be fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market.

References

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

12th Oct 2011 – Representatives Clean Energy Bill 2011 and related bills - Consideration in Detail - Agree to the bills

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion that: the bills ..., as amended, be agreed to

Passing this motion ended the discussion of the bills in detail. The next step is to vote on whether to read the bills a third time and therefore to pass them in the House of Representatives.(That vote is available here. )

The eighteen bills are a package to implement a carbon pricing mechanism,(Read more about the carbon pricing mechanism on the Clean Energy Regulator’s website.) which is a key policy of the Labor Government.

The eighteen bills are:

Background to the bills

The carbon pricing mechanism is set to begin on 1 July 2012. It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It will apply to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon will be fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market.

References

No Yes Passed by a small majority

12th Oct 2011 – Representatives Clean Energy (Fuel Tax Legislation Amendment) Bill 2011 and related bills - Consideration in Detail - Amendment

Show detail

The majority voted against an amendment to the Clean Energy (Fuel Tax Legislation Amendment) Bill 2011 that would further limit the coverage of the carbon price so that it would not apply to businesses whose annual use of taxable fuel has a carbon equivalence of less than 25 000 tonnes.

The amendment was introduced by Nationals MP Tony Crook.

The Labor Government opposed the amendment as it considered that the costs of the carbon price had already been addressed by its household assistance package and support for particularly affected industries.(See the discussion on the amendment here. )

The Clean Energy (Fuel Tax Legislation Amendment) Bill 2011 is part of a package of eighteen bills to implement a carbon pricing mechanism, which is a key policy of the Labor Government.

The eighteen bills are:

Background to the bills

The carbon pricing mechanism is set to begin on 1 July 2012.(Read more about the carbon pricing mechanism on the Clean Energy Regulator’s website.) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It will apply to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon will be fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market.

References

Yes No Not passed by a small majority

12th Oct 2011 – Representatives Clean Energy Bill 2011 and related bills - Consideration in Detail - Defer commencement of the carbon price

Show detail

The majority voted against an amendment to the Clean Energy Bill 2011 that would defer commencing the carbon price mechanism until after the election of the 44th Parliament.

The amendment was introduced by Liberal MP Tony Abbott, the Leader of the Opposition.

The Clean Energy Bill 2011 is part of a package of eighteen bills to implement a carbon pricing mechanism, which is a key policy of the Labor Government.

The eighteen bills are:

Background to the bills

The carbon pricing mechanism is set to begin on 1 July 2012.(Read more about the carbon pricing mechanism on the Clean Energy Regulator’s website.) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It will apply to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon will be fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market.

References

Yes No (strong) Not passed by a small majority

12th Oct 2011 – Representatives Clean Energy Bill 2011 and related bills - Consideration in Detail - Government amendments

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a number of Government amendments to the Clean Energy Bill 2011, Clean Energy (Consequential Amendments) Bill 2011, the Clean Energy (Household Assistance Amendments) Bill 2011 and the Clean Energy Regulator Bill 2011.(The amendments are available to read here and here. ) The amendments were introduced by Labor MP Greg Combet.

The four bills are part of a package of eighteen bills to implement a carbon pricing mechanism, which is a key policy of the Australian Labor Party while in Government.

The eighteen bills are:

Background to the bills

The carbon pricing mechanism is set to commence on 1 July 2012.(For more information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it works, please see the Clean Energy Regulator’s website.) It is an emissions trading scheme that will put a price on carbon emissions. It will apply to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon will be fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market.

References

No Yes Passed by a small majority

11th Oct 2011 – Representatives Clean Energy Bill 2011 and related bills - Second Reading - Read a second time

Show detail

The majority in favour of a motion that the bills be read a second time.

This means that the members agree with the main idea of the bills and can now discuss them in detail.

The eighteen bills are a package to implement a carbon pricing mechanism,(Read more about the carbon pricing mechanism on the Clean Energy Regulator’s website.) which is a key policy of the Labor Government.

The eighteen bills are:

Background to the bills

The carbon pricing mechanism is set to begin on 1 July 2012. It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It will apply to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon will be fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market.

References

No Yes (strong) Passed by a small majority

15th Sep 2011 – Representatives Carbon Tax Plebiscite Bill 2011 - Second Reading - Read a second time

Show detail

The majority voted against a motion to read the Carbon Tax Plebiscite Bill 2011 a second time.(Read more about the bill here. )

This means that the majority of members rejected the main idea of the bill and so it will not be considered any further.

Debate in Parliament

The bill called for a referendum to be held on 26 November 2011 on whether the Government should introduce the carbon pricing mechanism. It was introduced by Tony Abbott MP, the Leader of the Opposition, as a private member's bill.(Read MP Abbott's explanation of the bill here. )

Several Labor MPs described the bill as a "stunt".(Read their contributions here. )

Background to the bill

The carbon pricing mechanism is to commence on 1 July 2012.(More information on the carbon pricing mechanism and how it worked can be found on the Clean Energy Regulator’s website.) It is an emissions trading scheme that puts a price on carbon emissions. It applies to “liable entities” (a group that includes companies that emit a high level of greenhouse gases). Initially the price of carbon will be fixed by the mechanism but from 1 July 2015 the price will be set by the market.

References

Yes No Not passed by a small majority

12th May 2011 – Representatives Private Members' Business - Carbon Pricing - Carbon price essential

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion introduced by Labor MP Stephen Jones. This means that it was successful.

The motion was:

(1) agrees that putting a price on carbon is an essential step in reducing carbon pollution and transforming our economy to achieve a clean energy future;(Read more about carbon pricing in Australia here.)

(2) notes that in many manufacturing regions in Australia, business, unions, government and community organisations are already working to develop green jobs and clean energy production processes; and

(3) agrees that governments must work with the manufacturing industry and communities to assist their transformation to meet the challenge of a carbon constrained future.

References

No Yes Passed by a small majority

How "voted moderately against" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 1 50 50
MP voted against policy 3 0 150
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 2 20 20
MP voted against policy 5 0 50
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 3 3 6
Total: 73 276

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 73 / 276 = 26%.

And then