How Michael Sukkar voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should use regulation to increase the diversity of publishers and broadcasters in Australia's media industry by, for example, setting a threshold for the maximum market share of any one company.

Division Michael Sukkar Supporters vote Division outcome

21st Jun 2017, 11:21 AM – Representatives Broadcasting Legislation Amendment (Broadcasting Reform) Bill 2017, Commercial Broadcasting (Tax) Bill 2017 - Third Reading - Pass the bills

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The majority voted in favour of passing the bills. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to read them for a third time. This means that the bills will now go to the Senate, where they can decide whether to also pass them so they can become law.

What do the bills do?

The bills are part of an "historic package of reforms" that the Government announced earlier this year that affect free-to-air broadcasting in Australia.

Most controversially, the bills will repeal the ‘2 out of 3 cross-media control rule’, which:

prohibits a person controlling more than two out of three regulated media platforms (that is, a commercial television broadcasting licence, a commercial radio broadcasting licence and an associated newspaper) in any one commercial radio licence area.

Read more in the explanatory memorandum.

Yes No (strong) Passed by a small majority

21st Jun 2017, 11:11 AM – Representatives Broadcasting Legislation Amendment (Broadcasting Reform) Bill 2017, Commercial Broadcasting (Tax) Bill 2017 - Consideration in Detail - 2 out of 3 cross-media control rule

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The majority voted against an amendment introduced by Australian Labor MP Michelle Rowland (Greenway), which means the amendment failed.

What did the amendment do?

This bill proposes to repeal the ‘2 out of 3 cross-media control rule’, which:

prohibits a person controlling more than two out of three regulated media platforms (that is, a commercial television broadcasting licence, a commercial radio broadcasting licence and an associated newspaper) in any one commercial radio licence area.

Read more in the explanatory memorandum.

This amendment would have removed that part of the bill so that the 2 out of 3 cross-media control rule remains unchanged.

No Yes (strong) Not passed by a small majority

21st Jun 2017, 10:57 AM – Representatives Broadcasting Legislation Amendment (Broadcasting Reform) Bill 2017, Commercial Broadcasting (Tax) Bill 2017 - Second Reading - Agree to bills' main idea

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The majority voted in favour of the bills' main idea. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to read them for a second time. This means that they can now discuss the bills in more detail.

What is the bills' main idea?

The bills are part of an "historic package of reforms" that the Government announced earlier this year that affect free-to-air broadcasting in Australia.

Most controversially, the bills will repeal the ‘2 out of 3 cross-media control rule’, which:

prohibits a person controlling more than two out of three regulated media platforms (that is, a commercial television broadcasting licence, a commercial radio broadcasting licence and an associated newspaper) in any one commercial radio licence area.

Read more in the explanatory memorandum.

Yes No (strong) Passed by a small majority

30th Nov 2016, 5:48 PM – Representatives Broadcasting Legislation Amendment (Media Reform) Bill 2016 - Consideration in Detail - Cross-media control rule

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The majority voted against amendments introduced by Labor MP Michelle Rowland, which means they were unsuccessful.

The amendments would have deleted schedule 2 from the bill, which would have gotten rid of:

the two out of three cross-media control rule which ... prohibits a person controlling more than two out of three regulated media platforms (that is, a commercial television broadcasting licence, a commercial radio broadcasting licence and an associated newspaper) in any one commercial radio licence area.

What does this bill do?

The bill will get rid of certain media ownership, control and diversity laws, like the ‘75% audience reach rule’, which stops commercial television broadcasting licensees from controlling licences if the combined licence area has a population over 75% of Australia' population. It also gets rid of the ‘2 out of 3 cross-media control rule’, which "prohibits control over more than two out of three regulated media platforms in any one commercial radio licence area".

Read more in the bills digest.

Amendment text

(1) Clause 2, page 2 (table item 2, column 1), omit “Schedules 1 and 2”, substitute “Schedule 1”.

(2) Schedule 2, page 4 (line 1) to page 5 (line 14), omit the Schedule.

No Yes (strong) Not passed by a small majority

30th Nov 2016, 4:58 PM – Representatives Broadcasting Legislation Amendment (Media Reform) Bill 2016 - Second Reading - Agree with the bill's main idea

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The majority agreed with the main idea of the bill, which means they can now discuss it in more detail. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to read the bill for a second time.

What is the bill's main idea?

The bill will get rid of certain media ownership, control and diversity laws, like the ‘75% audience reach rule’, which stops commercial television broadcasting licensees from controlling licences if the combined licence area has a population over 75% of Australia' population. It also gets rid of the ‘2 out of 3 cross-media control rule’, which "prohibits control over more than two out of three regulated media platforms in any one commercial radio licence area".

Read more in the bills digest.

Yes No (strong) Passed by a small majority

How "voted very strongly against" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 5 0 250
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 0 0 0
Total: 0 250

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 0 / 250 = 0.0%.

And then