How Michael Sukkar voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should provide more funding for road infrastructure

Division Michael Sukkar Supporters vote Division outcome

25th Jun 2014, 4:53 PM – Representatives Customs Tariff Amendment (Fuel Indexation) Bill 2014 and related bills - Second Reading - Decline to read a second time

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Labor MP Joel Fitzgibbon, which means that it was rejected. It would have amended the original motion "That these bills be now read a second time" with the following:

That all words after “That” be omitted with a view to substituting the following words:

“the House declines to give the bill a second reading as the government’s petrol tax is a broken promise that will increase the cost of living for Australian families."

Background to the bills

The Customs Tariff Amendment (Fuel Indexation) Bill 2014 and related bills were introduced to index the rate of excise and excise-equivalent customs duty applying to fuels, including gaseous fuels, in line with changes in the Consumer Price Index (CPI). The amount gained through this fuel indexation will be put into a special account created by the Fuel Indexation (Road Funding) Special Account Bill 2014, which can only be used to fund road infrastructure.(Read more about the bills in the explanatory memorandum of the Customs Tariff Amendment (Fuel Indexation) Bill 2014.)

The two other related bills are:

No No Not passed by a small majority

25th Jun 2014 – Representatives Customs Tariff Amendment (Fuel Indexation) Bill 2014 and related bills - Second Reading - Read a second time

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to read the bills for a second time. This means that they agree with the main idea of the bills and will now discuss them in more detail.(Read more about the stages that a bill must pass through to become law here. )

Background to the bills

The Customs Tariff Amendment (Fuel Indexation) Bill 2014 and related bills were introduced to index the rate of excise and excise-equivalent customs duty applying to fuels, including gaseous fuels, in line with changes in the Consumer Price Index (CPI). The amount gained through this fuel indexation will be put into a special account created by the Fuel Indexation (Road Funding) Special Account Bill 2014, which can only be used to fund road infrastructure.(Read more about the bills in the explanatory memorandum of the Customs Tariff Amendment (Fuel Indexation) Bill 2014.)

The two other related bills are:

Yes Yes Passed by a small majority

How "voted very strongly for" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 2 20 20
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 0 0 0
Total: 20 20

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 20 / 20 = 100%.

And then