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senate vote 2019-12-02#8

Edited by mackay

on 2019-12-06 10:48:19

Title

  • Motions Climate Change
  • Motions - Climate Change - Work together

Description

  • <p class="speaker">Anne Urquhart</p>
  • <p>At the request of Senator Wong, I move:</p>
  • <p class="italic">That the Senate&#8212;</p>
  • The majority voted against a [motion](https://www.openaustralia.org.au/senate/?id=2019-12-02.152.2) introduced by Tasmanian Senator [Anne Urquhart](https://theyvoteforyou.org.au/people/senate/tasmania/anne_urquhart) (Labor) at the request of SA Senator [Penny Wong](https://theyvoteforyou.org.au/people/senate/sa/penny_wong) (Labor), which means it failed.
  • ### Motion text
  • > *That the Senate—*
  • >
  • > *(a) notes that:*
  • >
  • >> *(i) 2 December 2019 marks ten years since the Senate failed to pass legislation for a comprehensive economy-wide climate change policy, the Rudd Labor Government's Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme (CPRS),*
  • >>
  • >> *(ii) implementation of the CPRS would have resulted in Australia's greenhouse gas emissions being between 27 and 81 million tonnes lower in 2020 than currently projected, would have delivered additional cumulative abatement of between 63 and 218 million tonnes over the last 10 years, and would have placed Australian emissions on a sustained and long-term downward trajectory,*
  • >>
  • >> *(iii) in addition to Labor senators, the CPRS bills were supported by Liberal Senators Boyce and Troeth,*
  • >>
  • >> *(iv) despite the constructive negotiations engaged in by Mr Turnbull and Mr Macfarlane, the Liberals and the Nationals opposed the bills under the leadership of Mr Abbott, and*
  • >>
  • >> *(v) the Australian Greens joined with the Liberals and the Nationals, and also opposed the CPRS, guaranteeing its defeat;*
  • >
  • > *(b) recognises the decision by the Liberals, the Nationals and the Australian Greens to join together to oppose the CPRS precipitated:*
  • >
  • >> *(i) a breakdown in consensus on policy in Australia to address the challenges of climate change, and*
  • >>
  • >> *(ii) a decade of policy instability preventing necessary investment in energy infrastructure leading to increases in energy prices and increased emissions; and*
  • >
  • > *(c) calls on all parties to end the political opportunism and work together to agree an enduring solution to the challenges of climate change.*
  • <p class="italic">(a) notes that:</p>
  • <p class="italic">&#160;&#160;(i) 2 December 2019 marks ten years since the Senate failed to pass legislation for a comprehensive economy-wide climate change policy, the Rudd Labor Government's Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme (CPRS),</p>
  • <p class="italic">&#160;&#160;(ii) implementation of the CPRS would have resulted in Australia's greenhouse gas emissions being between 27 and 81 million tonnes lower in 2020 than currently projected, would have delivered additional cumulative abatement of between 63 and 218 million tonnes over the last 10 years, and would have placed Australian emissions on a sustained and long-term downward trajectory,</p>
  • <p class="italic">&#160;&#160;(iii) in addition to Labor senators, the CPRS bills were supported by Liberal Senators Boyce and Troeth,</p>
  • <p class="italic">&#160;&#160;(iv) despite the constructive negotiations engaged in by Mr Turnbull and Mr Macfarlane, the Liberals and the Nationals opposed the bills under the leadership of Mr Abbott, and</p>
  • <p class="italic">&#160;&#160;(v) the Australian Greens joined with the Liberals and the Nationals, and also opposed the CPRS, guaranteeing its defeat;</p>
  • <p class="italic">(b) recognises the decision by the Liberals, the Nationals and the Australian Greens to join together to oppose the CPRS precipitated:</p>
  • <p class="italic">&#160;&#160;(i) a breakdown in consensus on policy in Australia to address the challenges of climate change, and</p>
  • <p class="italic">&#160;&#160;(ii) a decade of policy instability preventing necessary investment in energy infrastructure leading to increases in energy prices and increased emissions; and</p>
  • <p class="italic">(c) calls on all parties to end the political opportunism and work together to agree an enduring solution to the challenges of climate change.</p>
  • <p class="speaker">Richard Di Natale</p>
  • <p>I seek leave to move amendments to general business notice of motion No. 314.</p>
  • <p>Leave not granted.</p>
  • <p class="speaker">Jonathon Duniam</p>
  • <p>I seek leave to make a very short statement.</p>
  • <p class="speaker">Sue Lines</p>
  • <p>Leave is granted for one minute.</p>
  • <p class="speaker">Jonathon Duniam</p>
  • <p>The Liberal and National government is proud to have opposed Labor's great big new tax on everything. The fact that Labor is still mourning their failed attempt to drive up the cost of living for Australians is telling about their future policies. While the opposition focus on their past, the government is delivering real and practical action to reduce emissions.</p>
  • <p class="speaker">Richard Di Natale</p>
  • <p>I seek leave to make a one-minute statement.</p>
  • <p class="speaker">Sue Lines</p>
  • <p>Leave is granted for one minute.</p>
  • <p class="speaker">Richard Di Natale</p>
  • <p>Again the Labor Party is denying leave to move an amendment to a motion. Let's remember what this motion is about. We're in a climate emergency here, and, rather than attacking the government, the Labor Party are spending their time attacking the Greens. If the Labor Party are so gutted about the fact that a price on carbon wasn't passed in 2009, despite the fact we got a better price in 2010, why won't they agree to one now? Why won't they agree to work with the Greens on passing a price on carbon now? While you rule out a price on carbon&#8212;</p>
  • <p>Honourable senators interjecting&#8212;</p>
  • <p class="speaker">Sue Lines</p>
  • <p>Order! I remind senators it is disorderly to interject, and more disorderly when no-one is in their correct seat.</p>
  • <p class="speaker">Richard Di Natale</p>
  • <p>If the Labor Party were serious, they'd support a price on carbon. They don't, which makes it very, very obvious what this is. This is a cynical tactic to distract from the fact that the Labor Party has no policy other than to support coal and to see emissions increase in this country.</p>
  • <p class="speaker">Penny Wong</p>
  • <p>I seek leave to make a short statement.</p>
  • <p>Leave not granted.</p>
  • <p class="speaker">Sue Lines</p>
  • <p>The question is that general business notice of motion No. 314, standing in the name of Senator Wong, be agreed to.</p>