All changes made to the description and title of this division.

View division | Edit description

Change Division
senate vote 2013-06-24#9

Edited by MA

on 2014-11-07 14:58:29

Title

  • Constitution Alteration (Local Government) 2013 - Third Reading - Read a third time
  • Constitution Alteration (Local Government) 2013 - Third Reading - Pass the bill

Description

  • The majority voted in favour of a motion to read the bill a [third time](http://www.peo.gov.au/students/fact_sheets/making_law.html).
  • This means that the bill is now passed in the Senate. As it has already passed in the House of Representatives,(That division is available [here](http://publicwhip-rails.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/division.php?date=2013-06-05&number=6&dmp=10&house=representatives). ) the bill will now become law. However, it cannot make any changes to the Constitution without a successful referendum (see 'Background to the bill' below).
  • Coalition senators were split on the question of whether they supported this bill.
  • _Background to the bill_
  • This bill represents a third attempt to have local government recognised in the [Australian Constitution](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constitution_of_Australia). Previous attempts occurred in [1974](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_referendum,_1974_%28Local_Government_Bodies%29) and [1988](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_referendum,_1988_%28Local_Government%29).
  • Recognition of local government in the Constitution would mean that the Commonwealth can directly fund local government.(For an academic discussion of what it means to recognise local government in the Constitution and the background of this latest attempt to do so, see Professor Anne Twomey's [report](http://sydney.edu.au/law/cru/documents/2013/CRU_Report_3_%20Local_Government.pdf) (906 KB). ) Currently the Federal Government can only fund local governments through the states.
  • Because this bill requires altering the Constitution, conditions under [Section 128](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Section_128_of_the_Australian_Constitution#Section_128) apply. These conditions include that the bill must pass both the House of Representatives and the Senate and then be submitted to voters in the states and territories in the form of a referendum. To be successful, there must be a double majority, which means:
  • - more than half of voters in Australia must vote 'Yes'; and
  • - more than half of voters in more than half the States must vote 'Yes' (in other words, a majority of voters in at least four of the six States must vote 'Yes')(Read more about what a double majority is [here](http://www.aec.gov.au/elections/referendums/Referendums_Overview.htm).)
  • More information about this Bill and the context surrounding it can be found [here](http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/download/legislation/billsdgs/2531622/upload_binary/2531622.pdf;fileType=application%2Fpdf#search=%22r5071%22) (775 KB) in its bills digest.
  • References
  • The majority supported passing the bill in the Senate (in parliamentary jargon, they supported reading the bill for a [third time](http://www.peo.gov.au/students/fact_sheets/making_law.html)). Since it has already [passed in the House of Representatives](https://theyvoteforyou.org.au/divisions/representatives/2013-06-05/6), the bill will now become law.
  • The main idea of the bill is to recognise [local governments](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Local_government_in_Australia) in the [Australian Constitution](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constitution_of_Australia) but it can't do this on its own. To amend the Constitution, there must be a successful [referendum](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Referendums_in_Australia) (as required by [Section 128](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Section_128_of_the_Australian_Constitution#Section_128)).
  • ###Rebellious Coalition senators
  • Coalition senators were split on this question. Seven Liberal senators and three National Party senators voted 'yes' while six Liberal senators and 1 National Party senator voted 'no'.
  • Liberal and National Party members are allowed to [rebel](https://theyvoteforyou.org.au/help/faq#rebel) (unlike Labor Party members), but it is increasingly uncommon.
  • ###What does recognising local governments mean?
  • Recognising local governments in the Constitution would mean that the federal government could directly fund local governments instead of having to fund them through state governments.
  • For an academic discussion of the effects of recognition, see Professor Anne Twomey's [report](http://sydney.edu.au/law/cru/documents/2013/CRU_Report_3_%20Local_Government.pdf) (906 KB).
  • ###Background to the bill
  • This is the third time that the federal government has tried to change the [Constitution](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constitution_of_Australia) to recognise [local governments](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Local_government_in_Australia). The first time was in [1974](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_referendum,_1974_%28Local_Government_Bodies%29) and the second time was in [1988](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_referendum,_1988_%28Local_Government%29).
  • See the [bills digest](http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/download/legislation/billsdgs/2531622/upload_binary/2531622.pdf;fileType=application%2Fpdf#search=%22r5071%22) (775 KB) for more background information.
senate vote 2013-06-24#9

Edited by system

on 2014-10-07 16:20:55

Title

Description

  • The majority voted in favour of a motion to read the bill a [http://www.peo.gov.au/students/fact_sheets/making_law.html third time].
  • This means that the bill is now passed in the Senate. As it has already passed in the House of Representatives,(That division is available [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/division.php?date=2013-06-05&number=6&dmp=10&house=representatives here]. ) the bill will now become law. However, it cannot make any changes to the Constitution without a successful referendum (see 'Background to the bill' below).
  • Coalition senators were split on the question of whether they supported this bill.
  • ''Background to the bill''
  • This bill represents a third attempt to have local government recognised in the [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constitution_of_Australia Australian Constitution]. Previous attempts occurred in [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_referendum,_1974_%28Local_Government_Bodies%29 1974] and [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_referendum,_1988_%28Local_Government%29 1988].
  • Recognition of local government in the Constitution would mean that the Commonwealth can directly fund local government.(For an academic discussion of what it means to recognise local government in the Constitution and the background of this latest attempt to do so, see Professor Anne Twomey's [http://sydney.edu.au/law/cru/documents/2013/CRU_Report_3_%20Local_Government.pdf report] (906 KB). ) Currently the Federal Government can only fund local governments through the states.
  • Because this bill requires altering the Constitution, conditions under [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Section_128_of_the_Australian_Constitution#Section_128 Section 128] apply. These conditions include that the bill must pass both the House of Representatives and the Senate and then be submitted to voters in the states and territories in the form of a referendum. To be successful, there must be a double majority, which means:
  • * more than half of voters in Australia must vote 'Yes'; and
  • * more than half of voters in more than half the States must vote 'Yes' (in other words, a majority of voters in at least four of the six States must vote 'Yes')(Read more about what a double majority is [http://www.aec.gov.au/elections/referendums/Referendums_Overview.htm here].)
  • More information about this Bill and the context surrounding it can be found [http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/download/legislation/billsdgs/2531622/upload_binary/2531622.pdf;fileType=application%2Fpdf#search=%22r5071%22 here] (775 KB) in its bills digest.
  • References
  • The majority voted in favour of a motion to read the bill a [third time](http://www.peo.gov.au/students/fact_sheets/making_law.html).
  • This means that the bill is now passed in the Senate. As it has already passed in the House of Representatives,(That division is available [here](http://publicwhip-rails.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/division.php?date=2013-06-05&number=6&dmp=10&house=representatives). ) the bill will now become law. However, it cannot make any changes to the Constitution without a successful referendum (see 'Background to the bill' below).
  • Coalition senators were split on the question of whether they supported this bill.
  • _Background to the bill_
  • This bill represents a third attempt to have local government recognised in the [Australian Constitution](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constitution_of_Australia). Previous attempts occurred in [1974](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_referendum,_1974_%28Local_Government_Bodies%29) and [1988](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_referendum,_1988_%28Local_Government%29).
  • Recognition of local government in the Constitution would mean that the Commonwealth can directly fund local government.(For an academic discussion of what it means to recognise local government in the Constitution and the background of this latest attempt to do so, see Professor Anne Twomey's [report](http://sydney.edu.au/law/cru/documents/2013/CRU_Report_3_%20Local_Government.pdf) (906 KB). ) Currently the Federal Government can only fund local governments through the states.
  • Because this bill requires altering the Constitution, conditions under [Section 128](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Section_128_of_the_Australian_Constitution#Section_128) apply. These conditions include that the bill must pass both the House of Representatives and the Senate and then be submitted to voters in the states and territories in the form of a referendum. To be successful, there must be a double majority, which means:
  • - more than half of voters in Australia must vote 'Yes'; and
  • - more than half of voters in more than half the States must vote 'Yes' (in other words, a majority of voters in at least four of the six States must vote 'Yes')(Read more about what a double majority is [here](http://www.aec.gov.au/elections/referendums/Referendums_Overview.htm).)
  • More information about this Bill and the context surrounding it can be found [here](http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/download/legislation/billsdgs/2531622/upload_binary/2531622.pdf;fileType=application%2Fpdf#search=%22r5071%22) (775 KB) in its bills digest.
  • References
senate vote 2013-06-24#9

Edited by system

on 2014-10-07 16:16:51

Title

Description

  • The majority voted in favour of a motion to read the bill a [http://www.peo.gov.au/students/fact_sheets/making_law.html third time].
  • This means that the bill is now passed in the Senate. As it has already passed in the House of Representatives,[1] the bill will now become law. However, it cannot make any changes to the Constitution without a successful referendum (see 'Background to the bill' below).
  • This means that the bill is now passed in the Senate. As it has already passed in the House of Representatives,(That division is available [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/division.php?date=2013-06-05&number=6&dmp=10&house=representatives here]. ) the bill will now become law. However, it cannot make any changes to the Constitution without a successful referendum (see 'Background to the bill' below).
  • Coalition senators were split on the question of whether they supported this bill.
  • ''Background to the bill''
  • This bill represents a third attempt to have local government recognised in the [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constitution_of_Australia Australian Constitution]. Previous attempts occurred in [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_referendum,_1974_%28Local_Government_Bodies%29 1974] and [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_referendum,_1988_%28Local_Government%29 1988].
  • Recognition of local government in the Constitution would mean that the Commonwealth can directly fund local government.[2] Currently the Federal Government can only fund local governments through the states.
  • Recognition of local government in the Constitution would mean that the Commonwealth can directly fund local government.(For an academic discussion of what it means to recognise local government in the Constitution and the background of this latest attempt to do so, see Professor Anne Twomey's [http://sydney.edu.au/law/cru/documents/2013/CRU_Report_3_%20Local_Government.pdf report] (906 KB). ) Currently the Federal Government can only fund local governments through the states.
  • Because this bill requires altering the Constitution, conditions under [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Section_128_of_the_Australian_Constitution#Section_128 Section 128] apply. These conditions include that the bill must pass both the House of Representatives and the Senate and then be submitted to voters in the states and territories in the form of a referendum. To be successful, there must be a double majority, which means:
  • * more than half of voters in Australia must vote 'Yes'; and
  • * more than half of voters in more than half the States must vote 'Yes' (in other words, a majority of voters in at least four of the six States must vote 'Yes')[3]
  • * more than half of voters in more than half the States must vote 'Yes' (in other words, a majority of voters in at least four of the six States must vote 'Yes')(Read more about what a double majority is [http://www.aec.gov.au/elections/referendums/Referendums_Overview.htm here].)
  • More information about this Bill and the context surrounding it can be found [http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/download/legislation/billsdgs/2531622/upload_binary/2531622.pdf;fileType=application%2Fpdf#search=%22r5071%22 here] (775 KB) in its bills digest.
  • References
  • * [1] That division is available [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/division.php?date=2013-06-05&number=6&dmp=10&house=representatives here].
  • * [2] For an academic discussion of what it means to recognise local government in the Constitution and the background of this latest attempt to do so, see Professor Anne Twomey's [http://sydney.edu.au/law/cru/documents/2013/CRU_Report_3_%20Local_Government.pdf report] (906 KB).
  • * [3] Read more about what a double majority is [http://www.aec.gov.au/elections/referendums/Referendums_Overview.htm here].
senate vote 2013-06-24#9

Edited by MA

on 2014-03-03 11:16:11

Title

Description

  • The majority voted in favour of a motion to read the bill a [http://www.peo.gov.au/students/fact_sheets/making_law.html third time].
  • This means that the bill is now passed in the Senate. As it has already passed in the House of Representatives,[1] the bill will now become law. However, it cannot make any changes to the Constitution without a successful referendum (see ''Background to the bill'' below).
  • This means that the bill is now passed in the Senate. As it has already passed in the House of Representatives,[1] the bill will now become law. However, it cannot make any changes to the Constitution without a successful referendum (see 'Background to the bill' below).
  • Coalition senators were split on the question of whether they supported this bill.
  • ''Background to the bill''
  • This bill represents a third attempt to have local government recognised in the [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constitution_of_Australia Australian Constitution]. Previous attempts occurred in [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_referendum,_1974_%28Local_Government_Bodies%29 1974] and [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_referendum,_1988_%28Local_Government%29 1988].
  • Recognition of local government in the Constitution would mean that the Commonwealth can directly fund local government.[2] Currently the Federal Government can only fund local governments through the states.
  • Because this bill requires altering the Constitution, conditions under [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Section_128_of_the_Australian_Constitution#Section_128 Section 128] apply. These conditions include that the bill must pass both the House of Representatives and the Senate and then be submitted to voters in the states and territories in the form of a referendum. To be successful, there must be a double majority, which means:
  • * more than half of voters in Australia must vote 'Yes'; and
  • * more than half of voters in more than half the States must vote 'Yes' (in other words, a majority of voters in at least four of the six States must vote 'Yes')[3]
  • More information about this Bill and the context surrounding it can be found [http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/download/legislation/billsdgs/2531622/upload_binary/2531622.pdf;fileType=application%2Fpdf#search=%22r5071%22 here] (775 KB) in its bills digest.
  • References
  • * [1] That division is available [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/division.php?date=2013-06-05&number=6&dmp=10&house=representatives here].
  • * [2] For an academic discussion of what it means to recognise local government in the Constitution and the background of this latest attempt to do so, see Professor Anne Twomey's [http://sydney.edu.au/law/cru/documents/2013/CRU_Report_3_%20Local_Government.pdf report] (906 KB).
  • * [3] Read more about what a double majority is [http://www.aec.gov.au/elections/referendums/Referendums_Overview.htm here].
senate vote 2013-06-24#9

Edited by MA

on 2014-03-03 11:15:52

Title

Description

  • The majority voted in favour of a motion to read the bill a [http://www.peo.gov.au/students/fact_sheets/making_law.html third time].
  • This means that the bill is now passed in the Senate. As it has already passed in the House of Representatives,[1] the bill will now become law. However, this bill cannot make any changes to the Constitution without a successful referendum (see ''Background to the bill'' below).
  • This means that the bill is now passed in the Senate. As it has already passed in the House of Representatives,[1] the bill will now become law. However, it cannot make any changes to the Constitution without a successful referendum (see ''Background to the bill'' below).
  • Coalition senators were split on the question of whether they supported this bill.
  • ''Background to the bill''
  • This bill represents a third attempt to have local government recognised in the [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constitution_of_Australia Australian Constitution]. Previous attempts occurred in [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_referendum,_1974_%28Local_Government_Bodies%29 1974] and [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_referendum,_1988_%28Local_Government%29 1988].
  • Recognition of local government in the Constitution would mean that the Commonwealth can directly fund local government.[2] Currently the Federal Government can only fund local governments through the states.
  • Because this bill requires altering the Constitution, conditions under [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Section_128_of_the_Australian_Constitution#Section_128 Section 128] apply. These conditions include that the bill must pass both the House of Representatives and the Senate and then be submitted to voters in the states and territories in the form of a referendum. To be successful, there must be a double majority, which means:
  • * more than half of voters in Australia must vote 'Yes'; and
  • * more than half of voters in more than half the States must vote 'Yes' (in other words, a majority of voters in at least four of the six States must vote 'Yes')[3]
  • More information about this Bill and the context surrounding it can be found [http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/download/legislation/billsdgs/2531622/upload_binary/2531622.pdf;fileType=application%2Fpdf#search=%22r5071%22 here] (775 KB) in its bills digest.
  • References
  • * [1] That division is available [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/division.php?date=2013-06-05&number=6&dmp=10&house=representatives here].
  • * [2] For an academic discussion of what it means to recognise local government in the Constitution and the background of this latest attempt to do so, see Professor Anne Twomey's [http://sydney.edu.au/law/cru/documents/2013/CRU_Report_3_%20Local_Government.pdf report] (906 KB).
  • * [3] Read more about what a double majority is [http://www.aec.gov.au/elections/referendums/Referendums_Overview.htm here].
senate vote 2013-06-24#9

Edited by MA

on 2014-03-03 11:15:27

Title

  • Bills - Constitution Alteration (Local Government) 2013; Third Reading
  • Constitution Alteration (Local Government) 2013 - Third Reading - Read a third time

Description

  • The majority voted in favour of a motion to read the bill a [http://www.peo.gov.au/students/fact_sheets/making_law.html third time].
  • This means that the bill is now passed in the Senate. As it has already passed in the House of Representatives,[1] the bill will now become law. However, this bill cannot make any changes to the Constitution without a successful referendum (see ''Background to the bill'' below).
  • <p>This is a vote on the <a href="http://www.peo.gov.au/students/fact_sheets/making_law.html">third reading</a> of this Bill in the Senate.</p>
  • <p>Someone who votes aye in this division supports this legislation. The majority voted aye to this Bill so it is proposed that this Bill will now go to the Governor General for assent.</p>
  • <p><b>Background to Bill</b></p>
  • <p>This is the third attempt to have local government recognised in the <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/About_Parliament/Senate/Powers_practice_n_procedures/~/media/AC79BBA0B87A4906A6D71ACCEEF10535.ashx">Australian Constitution</a>. Pervious attempts occurred in 1974 and 1988. Recognition of local government in the Constitution would mean that the Commonwealth can directly fund local government. Currently the Federal Government can only fund local Government vis-à-vis the states. </p>
  • <p>Because this Bill requires altering the Constitution, conditions under <a href="http://www.aec.gov.au/elections/referendums/Referendums_Overview.htm">Section 128</a> apply. This includes that the Bill must pass both Houses of Parliament and then be submitted to voters in the states and territories in the form of a referendum. The majority of both voters in the states must support this legislation and voters in Federal Parliament in order for a constitutional change to be successful.</p>
  • <p>An <a href="http://www.localgovrecognition.gov.au/">Expert Panel</a> to explore the issue of constitutional recognition of local government released it's <a href="http://localgovrecognition.gov.au/sites/localgovrecognition.gov.au/files/ExpertPanel-FinalReport.pdf ">final report</a> on 22 December 2011. On 9 May 2013 <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Julia_Gillard&mpc=Lalor&house=representatives">Prime Minister Gillard</a> announced that the referendum would take place on 14 September 2013, the same day as the proposed federal election. However when <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Kevin_Rudd&mpc=Griffith&house=representatives">Prime Minister Rudd</a> came to power the federal election date was moved to 7 September. As such, the referendum for the recognition of local government is was <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-08-05/election-date-puts-local-government-constitutional-recognition/4865116">put on hold</a>. It is not yet known if or when the <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Tony_Abbott&mpc=Warringah&house=representatives
  • ">Abbott</a> Government will hold a referendum on local government.</p>
  • <p>The State governments generally support constitutional recognition of local government in principal, but express concern that this will come at the expense of state powers. </p>
  • <p>More information about this Bill and the context surround it can be found <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/download/legislation/billsdgs/2531622/upload_binary/2531622.pdf;fileType=application%2Fpdf#search=%22r5071%22">here</a>.
  • Coalition senators were split on the question of whether they supported this bill.
  • ''Background to the bill''
  • This bill represents a third attempt to have local government recognised in the [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Constitution_of_Australia Australian Constitution]. Previous attempts occurred in [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_referendum,_1974_%28Local_Government_Bodies%29 1974] and [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_referendum,_1988_%28Local_Government%29 1988].
  • Recognition of local government in the Constitution would mean that the Commonwealth can directly fund local government.[2] Currently the Federal Government can only fund local governments through the states.
  • Because this bill requires altering the Constitution, conditions under [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Section_128_of_the_Australian_Constitution#Section_128 Section 128] apply. These conditions include that the bill must pass both the House of Representatives and the Senate and then be submitted to voters in the states and territories in the form of a referendum. To be successful, there must be a double majority, which means:
  • * more than half of voters in Australia must vote 'Yes'; and
  • * more than half of voters in more than half the States must vote 'Yes' (in other words, a majority of voters in at least four of the six States must vote 'Yes')[3]
  • More information about this Bill and the context surrounding it can be found [http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/download/legislation/billsdgs/2531622/upload_binary/2531622.pdf;fileType=application%2Fpdf#search=%22r5071%22 here] (775 KB) in its bills digest.
  • References
  • * [1] That division is available [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/division.php?date=2013-06-05&number=6&dmp=10&house=representatives here].
  • * [2] For an academic discussion of what it means to recognise local government in the Constitution and the background of this latest attempt to do so, see Professor Anne Twomey's [http://sydney.edu.au/law/cru/documents/2013/CRU_Report_3_%20Local_Government.pdf report] (906 KB).
  • * [3] Read more about what a double majority is [http://www.aec.gov.au/elections/referendums/Referendums_Overview.htm here].
senate vote 2013-06-24#9

Edited by Natasha Burrows

on 2013-10-17 17:04:12

Title

Description

  • <p>This is a vote on the <a href="http://www.peo.gov.au/students/fact_sheets/making_law.html">third reading</a> of this Bill in the Senate.</p>
  • <p>Someone who votes aye in this division supports this legislation. The majority voted aye to this Bill so it is proposed that this Bill will now go to the Governor General for assent.</p>
  • <p><b>Background to Bill</b></p>
  • <p>This is the third attempt to have local government recognised in the <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/About_Parliament/Senate/Powers_practice_n_procedures/~/media/AC79BBA0B87A4906A6D71ACCEEF10535.ashx">Australian Constitution</a>. Pervious attempts occurred in 1974 and 1988. Recognition of local government in the Constitution would mean that the Commonwealth can directly fund local government. Currently the Federal Government can only fund local Government vis-à-vis the states. </p>
  • <p>Because this Bill requires altering the Constitution, conditions under <a href="http://www.aec.gov.au/elections/referendums/Referendums_Overview.htm">Section 128</a> apply. This includes that the Bill must pass both Houses of Parliament and then be submitted to voters in the states and territories in the form of a referendum. The majority of both voters in the states must support this legislation and voters in Federal Parliament in order for a constitutional change to be successful.</p>
  • <p>An <a href="http://www.localgovrecognition.gov.au/">Expert Panel</a> to explore the issue of constitutional recognition of local government released it's <a href="http://localgovrecognition.gov.au/sites/localgovrecognition.gov.au/files/ExpertPanel-FinalReport.pdf ">final report</a> on 22 December 2011. On 9 May 2013 <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Julia_Gillard&mpc=Lalor&house=representatives">Prime Minister Gillard</a> announced that the referendum would take place on 14 September 2013, the same day as the proposed federal election. However when <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Kevin_Rudd&mpc=Griffith&house=representatives">Prime Minister Rudd</a> came to power the federal election date was moved to 7 September. As such, the referendum for the recognition of local government is was <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-08-05/election-date-puts-local-government-constitutional-recognition/4865116">put on hold</a>. It is not yet known if or when the <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Tony_Abbott&mpc=Warringah&house=representatives
  • ">Abbott</a> Government will hold a referendum on local government.</p>
  • <p>The State governments generally support constitutional recognition of local government in principal, but express concern that this will come at the expense of state powers. </p>
  • <p>More information about this Bill and the context surround it can be found <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/download/legislation/billsdgs/2531622/upload_binary/2531622.pdf;fileType=application%2Fpdf#search=%22r5071%22">here</a>.
senate vote 2013-06-24#9

Edited by Natasha Burrows

on 2013-10-17 16:11:09

Title

Description

  • <p>The aye votes succeeded in passing a motion that meant that debate on this legislation in the Senate would be adjourned. This was a vote on the motion proposed by <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Jacinta_Collins&mpc=Senate&house=senate">Senator Collins</a>.</p>
  • <p>Someone who votes aye in this division supports the adjournment of debate on this legislation. The majority voted aye so debate on this legislation was adjourned.</p>
  • <p>This is a vote on the <a href="http://www.peo.gov.au/students/fact_sheets/making_law.html">third reading</a> of this Bill in the Senate.</p>
  • <p>Someone who votes aye in this division supports this legislation. The majority voted aye to this Bill so it is proposed that this Bill will now go to the Governor General for assent.</p>
  • <p><b>Background to Bill</b></p>
  • <p>This is the third attempt to have local government recognised in the <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/About_Parliament/Senate/Powers_practice_n_procedures/~/media/AC79BBA0B87A4906A6D71ACCEEF10535.ashx">Australian Constitution</a>. Pervious attempts occurred in 1974 and 1988. Recognition of local government in the Constitution would mean that the Commonwealth can directly fund local government. Currently the Federal Government can only fund local Government vis-à-vis the states. </p>
  • <p>Because this Bill requires altering the Constitution, conditions under <a href="http://www.aec.gov.au/elections/referendums/Referendums_Overview.htm">Section 128</a> apply. This includes that the Bill must pass both Houses of Parliament and then be submitted to voters in the states and territories in the form of a referendum. The majority of both voters in the states must support this legislation and voters in Federal Parliament in order for a constitutional change to be successful.</p>
  • <p>An <a href="http://www.localgovrecognition.gov.au/">Expert Panel</a> to explore the issue of constitutional recognition of local government released it's <a href="http://localgovrecognition.gov.au/sites/localgovrecognition.gov.au/files/ExpertPanel-FinalReport.pdf ">final report</a> on 22 December 2011. On 9 May 2013 <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Julia_Gillard&mpc=Lalor&house=representatives">Prime Minister Gillard</a> announced that the referendum would take place on 14 September 2013, the same day as the proposed federal election. However when <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Kevin_Rudd&mpc=Griffith&house=representatives">Prime Minister Rudd</a> came to power the federal election date was moved to 7 September. As such, the referendum for the recognition of local government is was <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-08-05/election-date-puts-local-government-constitutional-recognition/4865116">put on hold</a>. It is not yet known if or when the <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Tony_Abbott&mpc=Warringah&house=representatives
  • ">Abbott</a> Government will hold a referendum on local government.</p>
  • <p>The State governments generally support constitutional recognition of local government in principal, but express concern that this will come at the expense of state powers. </p>
  • <p>More information about this Bill and the context surround it can be found <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/download/legislation/billsdgs/2531622/upload_binary/2531622.pdf;fileType=application%2Fpdf#search=%22r5071%22">here</a>.
senate vote 2013-06-24#9

Edited by Natasha Burrows

on 2013-10-15 17:07:11

Title

  • Bills Constitution Alteration (Local Government) 2013; Third Reading
  • Bills - Constitution Alteration (Local Government) 2013; Third Reading

Description

  • <p class="motion-notice motion-notice-notext">No motion text available</p>
  • <p>The aye votes succeeded in passing a motion that meant that debate on this legislation in the Senate would be adjourned. This was a vote on the motion proposed by <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Jacinta_Collins&mpc=Senate&house=senate">Senator Collins</a>.</p>
  • <p>Someone who votes aye in this division supports the adjournment of debate on this legislation. The majority voted aye so debate on this legislation was adjourned.</p>
  • <p><b>Background to Bill</b></p>
  • <p>This is the third attempt to have local government recognised in the <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/About_Parliament/Senate/Powers_practice_n_procedures/~/media/AC79BBA0B87A4906A6D71ACCEEF10535.ashx">Australian Constitution</a>. Pervious attempts occurred in 1974 and 1988. Recognition of local government in the Constitution would mean that the Commonwealth can directly fund local government. Currently the Federal Government can only fund local Government vis-à-vis the states. </p>
  • <p>Because this Bill requires altering the Constitution, conditions under <a href="http://www.aec.gov.au/elections/referendums/Referendums_Overview.htm">Section 128</a> apply. This includes that the Bill must pass both Houses of Parliament and then be submitted to voters in the states and territories in the form of a referendum. The majority of both voters in the states must support this legislation and voters in Federal Parliament in order for a constitutional change to be successful.</p>
  • <p>An <a href="http://www.localgovrecognition.gov.au/">Expert Panel</a> to explore the issue of constitutional recognition of local government released it's <a href="http://localgovrecognition.gov.au/sites/localgovrecognition.gov.au/files/ExpertPanel-FinalReport.pdf ">final report</a> on 22 December 2011. On 9 May 2013 <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Julia_Gillard&mpc=Lalor&house=representatives">Prime Minister Gillard</a> announced that the referendum would take place on 14 September 2013, the same day as the proposed federal election. However when <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Kevin_Rudd&mpc=Griffith&house=representatives">Prime Minister Rudd</a> came to power the federal election date was moved to 7 September. As such, the referendum for the recognition of local government is was <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-08-05/election-date-puts-local-government-constitutional-recognition/4865116">put on hold</a>. It is not yet known if or when the <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Tony_Abbott&mpc=Warringah&house=representatives
  • ">Abbott</a> Government will hold a referendum on local government.</p>
  • <p>The State governments generally support constitutional recognition of local government in principal, but express concern that this will come at the expense of state powers. </p>
  • <p>More information about this Bill and the context surround it can be found <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/download/legislation/billsdgs/2531622/upload_binary/2531622.pdf;fileType=application%2Fpdf#search=%22r5071%22">here</a>.