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senate vote 2011-10-11#4

Edited by system

on 2014-10-07 16:20:33

Title

Description

  • The majority voted in favour of a [http://www.openaustralia.org/senate/?gid=2011-10-11.17.9 motion] to read the bill a third time. The bill allows universities to impose an annual capped compulsory student services and amenities fee.
  • This means that the bill has been passed in the Senate and, as it has already been passed in the House of Representatives, it will now be sent to the Governor General to be made into law.
  • ''Debate in Parliament''
  • The bill was introduced into the Senate by Labor Party Senator [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Don_Farrell&mpc=Senate&house=senate Don Farrell] during the last week of sitting in 2010.(See MP Farrell's motion [http://www.openaustralia.org/senate/?id=2010-11-22.55.2 here]. ) However, it was not debated until the following September.
  • Liberal Party Senator [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Brett_Mason&mpc=Senate&house=senate Brett Mason] said that the Coalition opposed the bill “because we do not believe that students should be forced to pay for services that they would not or cannot use”.(Read MP Mason's contribution [http://www.openaustralia.org/senate/?gid=2011-09-19.56.1 here]. )
  • Labor Party Senator [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Carol_Brown&mpc=Senate&house=senate Carol Brown], the Deputy Government Whip in the Senate, argued that the bill “will restore resources for representation and advocacy as well as vital services and amenities”.(Read MP Brown's contribution [http://www.openaustralia.org/senate/?gid=2011-09-19.57.1 here]. )
  • ''Background to the bill''
  • Compulsory student union fees were abolished under then Prime Minister John Howard’s Coalition Government with the [http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r2283 Higher Education Support Amendment (Abolition of Compulsory Upfront Student Union Fees) Bill 2005]. This meant that universities could no longer require students to pay a compulsory fee for facilities, amenities or services that were not of an academic nature.
  • The [http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/bd/bd1011a/11bd018 Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities) Bill 2010] is the third bill introduced by the Labor Government to re-introduce a compulsory student services and amenities fee since 2009. The first bill, the [http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r4049 Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities, and other Measures) Bill 2009], was defeated in the Senate.(See that division [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/division.php?date=2009-08-18&number=1&house=senate here].) The second, the [http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r4195 Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities) Bill 2009], lapsed at the end of the 42nd Parliament.
  • References
  • The majority voted in favour of a [motion](http://www.openaustralia.org/senate/?gid=2011-10-11.17.9) to read the bill a third time. The bill allows universities to impose an annual capped compulsory student services and amenities fee.
  • This means that the bill has been passed in the Senate and, as it has already been passed in the House of Representatives, it will now be sent to the Governor General to be made into law.
  • _Debate in Parliament_
  • The bill was introduced into the Senate by Labor Party Senator [Don Farrell](http://publicwhip-rails.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Don_Farrell&mpc=Senate&house=senate) during the last week of sitting in 2010.(See MP Farrell's motion [here](http://www.openaustralia.org/senate/?id=2010-11-22.55.2). ) However, it was not debated until the following September.
  • Liberal Party Senator [Brett Mason](http://publicwhip-rails.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Brett_Mason&mpc=Senate&house=senate) said that the Coalition opposed the bill “because we do not believe that students should be forced to pay for services that they would not or cannot use”.(Read MP Mason's contribution [here](http://www.openaustralia.org/senate/?gid=2011-09-19.56.1). )
  • Labor Party Senator [Carol Brown](http://publicwhip-rails.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Carol_Brown&mpc=Senate&house=senate), the Deputy Government Whip in the Senate, argued that the bill “will restore resources for representation and advocacy as well as vital services and amenities”.(Read MP Brown's contribution [here](http://www.openaustralia.org/senate/?gid=2011-09-19.57.1). )
  • _Background to the bill_
  • Compulsory student union fees were abolished under then Prime Minister John Howard’s Coalition Government with the [Higher Education Support Amendment (Abolition of Compulsory Upfront Student Union Fees) Bill 2005](http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r2283). This meant that universities could no longer require students to pay a compulsory fee for facilities, amenities or services that were not of an academic nature.
  • The [Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities) Bill 2010](http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/bd/bd1011a/11bd018) is the third bill introduced by the Labor Government to re-introduce a compulsory student services and amenities fee since 2009. The first bill, the [Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities, and other Measures) Bill 2009](http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r4049), was defeated in the Senate.(See that division [here](http://publicwhip-rails.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/division.php?date=2009-08-18&number=1&house=senate).) The second, the [Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities) Bill 2009](http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r4195), lapsed at the end of the 42nd Parliament.
  • References
senate vote 2011-10-11#4

Edited by system

on 2014-10-07 16:16:42

Title

Description

  • The majority voted in favour of a [http://www.openaustralia.org/senate/?gid=2011-10-11.17.9 motion] to read the bill a third time. The bill allows universities to impose an annual capped compulsory student services and amenities fee.
  • This means that the bill has been passed in the Senate and, as it has already been passed in the House of Representatives, it will now be sent to the Governor General to be made into law.
  • ''Debate in Parliament''
  • The bill was introduced into the Senate by Labor Party Senator [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Don_Farrell&mpc=Senate&house=senate Don Farrell] during the last week of sitting in 2010.[1] However, it was not debated until the following September.
  • The bill was introduced into the Senate by Labor Party Senator [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Don_Farrell&mpc=Senate&house=senate Don Farrell] during the last week of sitting in 2010.(See MP Farrell's motion [http://www.openaustralia.org/senate/?id=2010-11-22.55.2 here]. ) However, it was not debated until the following September.
  • Liberal Party Senator [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Brett_Mason&mpc=Senate&house=senate Brett Mason] said that the Coalition opposed the bill “because we do not believe that students should be forced to pay for services that they would not or cannot use”.[2]
  • Liberal Party Senator [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Brett_Mason&mpc=Senate&house=senate Brett Mason] said that the Coalition opposed the bill “because we do not believe that students should be forced to pay for services that they would not or cannot use”.(Read MP Mason's contribution [http://www.openaustralia.org/senate/?gid=2011-09-19.56.1 here]. )
  • Labor Party Senator [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Carol_Brown&mpc=Senate&house=senate Carol Brown], the Deputy Government Whip in the Senate, argued that the bill “will restore resources for representation and advocacy as well as vital services and amenities”.[3]
  • Labor Party Senator [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Carol_Brown&mpc=Senate&house=senate Carol Brown], the Deputy Government Whip in the Senate, argued that the bill “will restore resources for representation and advocacy as well as vital services and amenities”.(Read MP Brown's contribution [http://www.openaustralia.org/senate/?gid=2011-09-19.57.1 here]. )
  • ''Background to the bill''
  • Compulsory student union fees were abolished under then Prime Minister John Howard’s Coalition Government with the [http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r2283 Higher Education Support Amendment (Abolition of Compulsory Upfront Student Union Fees) Bill 2005]. This meant that universities could no longer require students to pay a compulsory fee for facilities, amenities or services that were not of an academic nature.
  • The [http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/bd/bd1011a/11bd018 Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities) Bill 2010] is the third bill introduced by the Labor Government to re-introduce a compulsory student services and amenities fee since 2009. The first bill, the [http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r4049 Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities, and other Measures) Bill 2009], was defeated in the Senate.[4] The second, the [http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r4195 Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities) Bill 2009], lapsed at the end of the 42nd Parliament.
  • The [http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/bd/bd1011a/11bd018 Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities) Bill 2010] is the third bill introduced by the Labor Government to re-introduce a compulsory student services and amenities fee since 2009. The first bill, the [http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r4049 Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities, and other Measures) Bill 2009], was defeated in the Senate.(See that division [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/division.php?date=2009-08-18&number=1&house=senate here].) The second, the [http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r4195 Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities) Bill 2009], lapsed at the end of the 42nd Parliament.
  • References
  • * [1] See MP Farrell's motion [http://www.openaustralia.org/senate/?id=2010-11-22.55.2 here].
  • * [2] Read MP Mason's contribution [http://www.openaustralia.org/senate/?gid=2011-09-19.56.1 here].
  • * [3] Read MP Brown's contribution [http://www.openaustralia.org/senate/?gid=2011-09-19.57.1 here].
  • * [4] See that division [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/division.php?date=2009-08-18&number=1&house=senate here].
senate vote 2011-10-11#4

Edited by mackay

on 2014-02-17 16:15:11

Title

  • Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities) Bill 2010 - Third Reading - Introduce a compulsory student services and amenities fee
  • Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities) Bill 2010 - Third Reading - Read a third time

Description

  • The majority voted in favour of a [http://www.openaustralia.org/senate/?gid=2011-10-11.17.9 motion] to read the bill a third time. The bill allows universities to impose an annual capped compulsory student services and amenities fee.
  • This means that the bill has been passed in the Senate and, as it has already been passed in the House of Representatives, it will now be sent to the Governor General to be made into law.
  • <p>The Aye-voters succeeded in passing a motion to read the bill a third time.</p>
  • ''Debate in Parliament''
  • <p>This means that the bill has been passed in the Senate and, as it has already been passed in the House of Representatives, it will now be sent to the Governor General to be made into law.</p>
  • The bill was introduced into the Senate by Labor Party Senator [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Don_Farrell&mpc=Senate&house=senate Don Farrell] during the last week of sitting in 2010.[1] However, it was not debated until the following September.
  • <p>Someone who voted Aye supported the bill, which allows universities to impose an annual capped compulsory student services and amenities fee.</p>
  • Liberal Party Senator [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Brett_Mason&mpc=Senate&house=senate Brett Mason] said that the Coalition opposed the bill “because we do not believe that students should be forced to pay for services that they would not or cannot use”.[2]
  • <p><b>Debate in Parliament</b></p>
  • Labor Party Senator [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Carol_Brown&mpc=Senate&house=senate Carol Brown], the Deputy Government Whip in the Senate, argued that the bill “will restore resources for representation and advocacy as well as vital services and amenities”.[3]
  • <p>The bill was <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;db=CHAMBER;id=chamber%2Fhansards%2F2010-11-22%2F0086;query=Id%3A%22chamber%2Fhansards%2F2010-11-22%2F0000%22">introduced into the Senate</a> by Labor Party Senator <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Don_Farrell&mpc=Senate&house=senate">Don Farrell</a> during the last week of sitting in 2010. However, it was not debated until the following September.</p>
  • ''Background to the bill''
  • <p>Liberal Party Senator <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Brett_Mason&mpc=Senate&house=senate">Brett Mason</a>, speaking on behalf of the Coalition, argued that the debate was not complicated. He said that the Coalition opposed the bill “because we do not believe that students should be forced to pay for services that they would not or cannot use”.</a>
  • Compulsory student union fees were abolished under then Prime Minister John Howard’s Coalition Government with the [http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r2283 Higher Education Support Amendment (Abolition of Compulsory Upfront Student Union Fees) Bill 2005]. This meant that universities could no longer require students to pay a compulsory fee for facilities, amenities or services that were not of an academic nature.
  • <p>Labor Party Senator <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Carol_Brown&mpc=Senate&house=senate">Carol Brown</a>, then Deputy Government Whip in the Senate, argued that the bill “will restore resources for representation and advocacy as well as vital services and amenities”.
  • The [http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/bd/bd1011a/11bd018 Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities) Bill 2010] is the third bill introduced by the Labor Government to re-introduce a compulsory student services and amenities fee since 2009. The first bill, the [http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r4049 Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities, and other Measures) Bill 2009], was defeated in the Senate.[4] The second, the [http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r4195 Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities) Bill 2009], lapsed at the end of the 42nd Parliament.
  • <p><b>Background to the bill</b></p>
  • <p>Compulsory student union fees were abolished under then Prime Minister John Howard’s Coalition Government with the <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r2283">Higher Education Support Amendment (Abolition of Compulsory Upfront Student Union Fees) Bill 2005</a>. This meant that universities could no longer require students to pay a compulsory fee for facilities, amenities or services that were not of an academic nature.</p>
  • <p>This was the third bill introduced by the Labor Government to re-introduce a compulsory student services and amenities fee since 2009. The first bill, the <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r4049">Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities, and other Measures) Bill 2009</a>, was defeated in the Senate (see that division <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/division.php?date=2009-08-18&number=1&house=senate">here</a>). The second, the <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r4195">Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities) Bill 2009</a>, lapsed at the end of the 42nd Parliament.</p>
  • <p>More information about this bill and its context can be found <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/bd/bd1011a/11bd018">here</a>.</p>
  • References
  • * [1] See MP Farrell's motion [http://www.openaustralia.org/senate/?id=2010-11-22.55.2 here].
  • * [2] Read MP Mason's contribution [http://www.openaustralia.org/senate/?gid=2011-09-19.56.1 here].
  • * [3] Read MP Brown's contribution [http://www.openaustralia.org/senate/?gid=2011-09-19.57.1 here].
  • * [4] See that division [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/division.php?date=2009-08-18&number=1&house=senate here].
senate vote 2011-10-11#4

Edited by mackay

on 2013-11-08 15:41:49

Title

Description

  • <p>The Aye-voters succeeded in passing a motion to read the bill a third time.</p>
  • <p>This means that the bill has been passed in the Senate and, as it has already been passed in the House of Representatives, it will now be sent to the Governor General to be made into law.</p>
  • <p>Someone who voted Aye supported the bill, which allows universities to impose an annual capped compulsory student services and amenities fee.</p>
  • <p><b>Debate in Parliament</b></p>
  • <p>The bill was <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;db=CHAMBER;id=chamber%2Fhansards%2F2010-11-22%2F0086;query=Id%3A%22chamber%2Fhansards%2F2010-11-22%2F0000%22">introduced into the Senate</a> by Labor Party Senator <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Don_Farrell&mpc=Senate&house=senate">Don Farrell</a> during the last week of sitting in 2010. However, it was not debated until the following September.</p>
  • <p>Liberal Party Senator <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Brett_Mason&mpc=Senate&house=senate">Brett Mason</a>, speaking on behalf of the Coalition, argued that the debate was not complicated. He said that the Coalition opposed the bill “because we do not believe that students should be forced to pay for services that they would not or cannot use”.</a>
  • <p>Labor Party Senator <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Carol_Brown&mpc=Senate&house=senate">Carol Brown</a>, then Deputy Government Whip in the Senate, argued that the bill “will restore resources for representation and advocacy as well as vital services and amenities”.
  • <p><b>Background to the bill</b></p>
  • <p>Compulsory student union fees were abolished under then Prime Minister John Howard’s Coalition Government with the <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r2283">Higher Education Support Amendment (Abolition of Compulsory Upfront Student Union Fees) Bill 2005</a>. This meant that universities could no longer require students to pay a compulsory fee for facilities, amenities or services that were not of an academic nature.</p>
  • <p>This was the third bill introduced by the Labor Government to re-introduce compulsory student union fees since 2009. The first bill, the <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r4049">Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities, and other Measures) Bill 2009</a>, was defeated in the Senate (see that division <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/division.php?date=2009-08-18&number=1&house=senate">here</a>). The second, the <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r4195">Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities) Bill 2009</a>, lapsed at the end of the 42nd Parliament.</p>
  • <p>This was the third bill introduced by the Labor Government to re-introduce a compulsory student services and amenities fee since 2009. The first bill, the <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r4049">Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities, and other Measures) Bill 2009</a>, was defeated in the Senate (see that division <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/division.php?date=2009-08-18&number=1&house=senate">here</a>). The second, the <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r4195">Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities) Bill 2009</a>, lapsed at the end of the 42nd Parliament.</p>
  • <p>More information about this bill and its context can be found <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/bd/bd1011a/11bd018">here</a>.</p>
senate vote 2011-10-11#4

Edited by mackay

on 2013-11-08 14:05:40

Title

Description

  • <p>The Aye-voters succeeded in passing a motion to read the bill a third time.</p>
  • <p>This means that the bill has been passed in the Senate and, as it has already been passed in the House of Representatives, it will now be sent to the Governor General to be made into law.</p>
  • <p>Someone who voted Aye supported the bill, which allows universities to impose an annual capped compulsory student services and amenities fee.</p>
  • <p><b>Debate in Parliament</b></p>
  • <p>The bill was <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;db=CHAMBER;id=chamber%2Fhansards%2F2010-11-22%2F0086;query=Id%3A%22chamber%2Fhansards%2F2010-11-22%2F0000%22">introduced into the Senate</a> by Labor Party Senator <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Don_Farrell&mpc=Senate&house=senate">Don Farrell</a> during the last week of sitting in 2010. However, it was not debated until the following September.</p>
  • <p>Liberal Party Senator <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Brett_Mason&mpc=Senate&house=senate">Brett Mason</a>, speaking on behalf of the Coalition, argued that the debate was not complicated. He said that the coalition opposed the bill “because we do not believe that students should be forced to pay for services that they would not or cannot use”.</a>
  • <p>Liberal Party Senator <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Brett_Mason&mpc=Senate&house=senate">Brett Mason</a>, speaking on behalf of the Coalition, argued that the debate was not complicated. He said that the Coalition opposed the bill “because we do not believe that students should be forced to pay for services that they would not or cannot use”.</a>
  • <p>Labor Party Senator <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Carol_Brown&mpc=Senate&house=senate">Carol Brown</a>, then Deputy Government Whip in the Senate, argued that the bill “will restore resources for representation and advocacy as well as vital services and amenities”.
  • <p><b>Background to the bill</b></p>
  • <p>Compulsory student union fees were abolished under then Prime Minister John Howard’s Coalition Government with the <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r2283">Higher Education Support Amendment (Abolition of Compulsory Upfront Student Union Fees) Bill 2005</a>. This meant that universities could no longer require students to pay a compulsory fee for facilities, amenities or services that were not of an academic nature.</p>
  • <p>This was the third bill introduced by the Labor Government to re-introduce compulsory student union fees since 2009. The first bill, the <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r4049">Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities, and other Measures) Bill 2009</a>, was defeated in the Senate (see that division <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/division.php?date=2009-08-18&number=1&house=senate">here</a>). The second, the <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r4195">Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities) Bill 2009</a>, lapsed at the end of the 42nd Parliament.</p>
  • <p>More information about this bill and its context can be found <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/bd/bd1011a/11bd018">here</a>.</p>
senate vote 2011-10-11#4

Edited by mackay

on 2013-11-08 14:04:11

Title

  • Bills — Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities) Bill 2010; Third Reading
  • Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities) Bill 2010 - Third Reading - Introduce a compulsory student services and amenities fee

Description

  • <p class="motion-notice motion-notice-notext">No motion text available</p>
  • <p>The Aye-voters succeeded in passing a motion to read the bill a third time.</p>
  • <p>This means that the bill has been passed in the Senate and, as it has already been passed in the House of Representatives, it will now be sent to the Governor General to be made into law.</p>
  • <p>Someone who voted Aye supported the bill, which allows universities to impose an annual capped compulsory student services and amenities fee.</p>
  • <p><b>Debate in Parliament</b></p>
  • <p>The bill was <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;db=CHAMBER;id=chamber%2Fhansards%2F2010-11-22%2F0086;query=Id%3A%22chamber%2Fhansards%2F2010-11-22%2F0000%22">introduced into the Senate</a> by Labor Party Senator <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Don_Farrell&mpc=Senate&house=senate">Don Farrell</a> during the last week of sitting in 2010. However, it was not debated until the following September.</p>
  • <p>Liberal Party Senator <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Brett_Mason&mpc=Senate&house=senate">Brett Mason</a>, speaking on behalf of the Coalition, argued that the debate was not complicated. He said that the coalition opposed the bill “because we do not believe that students should be forced to pay for services that they would not or cannot use”.</a>
  • <p>Labor Party Senator <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Carol_Brown&mpc=Senate&house=senate">Carol Brown</a>, then Deputy Government Whip in the Senate, argued that the bill “will restore resources for representation and advocacy as well as vital services and amenities”.
  • <p><b>Background to the bill</b></p>
  • <p>Compulsory student union fees were abolished under then Prime Minister John Howard’s Coalition Government with the <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r2283">Higher Education Support Amendment (Abolition of Compulsory Upfront Student Union Fees) Bill 2005</a>. This meant that universities could no longer require students to pay a compulsory fee for facilities, amenities or services that were not of an academic nature.</p>
  • <p>This was the third bill introduced by the Labor Government to re-introduce compulsory student union fees since 2009. The first bill, the <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r4049">Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities, and other Measures) Bill 2009</a>, was defeated in the Senate (see that division <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/division.php?date=2009-08-18&number=1&house=senate">here</a>). The second, the <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r4195">Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities) Bill 2009</a>, lapsed at the end of the 42nd Parliament.</p>
  • <p>More information about this bill and its context can be found <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/bd/bd1011a/11bd018">here</a>.</p>