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representatives vote 2009-03-19#6

Edited by system

on 2014-10-07 16:18:33

Title

Description

  • The majority voted in favour of a [http://www.openaustralia.org/debate/?id=2009-03-19.64.33 motion] to read the bill a second time.
  • This means that the majority of members agree with the main idea of the bill.
  • Someone who voted Aye supported the main idea of the bill, which was to allow universities to impose an annual capped compulsory student services and amenities fee. Since the majority voted Aye, the bill can now be discussed in greater detail.
  • However, in this case, the members agreed to give the bill a third reading immediately after this division.(That division is available [http://www.openaustralia.org/debates/?id=2009-03-19.67.1 here]. ) This means that the bill was passed in the House of Representatives and would now be sent to the Senate for their consideration.
  • ''Debate in Parliament''
  • The bill was introduced by Labor Party MP [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Kate_Ellis&mpc=Adelaide&house=representatives Kate Ellis], the Minister for Youth and Minister for Sport. She said that the bill delivers “the government’s election commitment to rebuild important university student services and to also ensure that students have representation on campus”.(See MP Ellis' full discussion of the bill [http://www.openaustralia.org/debates/?id=2009-02-11.10.1 here]. )
  • Liberal Party MP [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Sophie_Mirabella&mpc=Indi&house=representatives Sophie Mirabella], the Shadow Minister for Youth, claimed that the bill’s "primary purpose is to impose a new tax on the one million students attending universities across the nation, whether the students are full time, part time, studying on campus or external".(See MP Mirabella's contribution [http://www.openaustralia.org/debates/?id=2009-02-24.48.2 here]. )
  • ''Background to the bill''
  • Compulsory student union fees were abolished under then Prime Minister John Howard’s Coalition Government with the [http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r2283 Higher Education Support Amendment (Abolition of Compulsory Upfront Student Union Fees) Bill 2005]. This meant that universities could no longer require students to pay a compulsory fee for facilities, amenities or services that were not of an academic nature.
  • This bill aims to re-introduce a compulsory student services and amenities fee.(More information about this bill and its context can be found [http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/bd/bd0809/09bd107 here].)
  • References
  • The majority voted in favour of a [motion](http://www.openaustralia.org/debate/?id=2009-03-19.64.33) to read the bill a second time.
  • This means that the majority of members agree with the main idea of the bill.
  • Someone who voted Aye supported the main idea of the bill, which was to allow universities to impose an annual capped compulsory student services and amenities fee. Since the majority voted Aye, the bill can now be discussed in greater detail.
  • However, in this case, the members agreed to give the bill a third reading immediately after this division.(That division is available [here](http://www.openaustralia.org/debates/?id=2009-03-19.67.1). ) This means that the bill was passed in the House of Representatives and would now be sent to the Senate for their consideration.
  • _Debate in Parliament_
  • The bill was introduced by Labor Party MP [Kate Ellis](http://publicwhip-rails.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Kate_Ellis&mpc=Adelaide&house=representatives), the Minister for Youth and Minister for Sport. She said that the bill delivers “the government’s election commitment to rebuild important university student services and to also ensure that students have representation on campus”.(See MP Ellis' full discussion of the bill [here](http://www.openaustralia.org/debates/?id=2009-02-11.10.1). )
  • Liberal Party MP [Sophie Mirabella](http://publicwhip-rails.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Sophie_Mirabella&mpc=Indi&house=representatives), the Shadow Minister for Youth, claimed that the bill’s "primary purpose is to impose a new tax on the one million students attending universities across the nation, whether the students are full time, part time, studying on campus or external".(See MP Mirabella's contribution [here](http://www.openaustralia.org/debates/?id=2009-02-24.48.2). )
  • _Background to the bill_
  • Compulsory student union fees were abolished under then Prime Minister John Howard’s Coalition Government with the [Higher Education Support Amendment (Abolition of Compulsory Upfront Student Union Fees) Bill 2005](http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r2283). This meant that universities could no longer require students to pay a compulsory fee for facilities, amenities or services that were not of an academic nature.
  • This bill aims to re-introduce a compulsory student services and amenities fee.(More information about this bill and its context can be found [here](http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/bd/bd0809/09bd107).)
  • References
representatives vote 2009-03-19#6

Edited by system

on 2014-10-07 16:16:16

Title

Description

  • The majority voted in favour of a [http://www.openaustralia.org/debate/?id=2009-03-19.64.33 motion] to read the bill a second time.
  • This means that the majority of members agree with the main idea of the bill.
  • Someone who voted Aye supported the main idea of the bill, which was to allow universities to impose an annual capped compulsory student services and amenities fee. Since the majority voted Aye, the bill can now be discussed in greater detail.
  • However, in this case, the members agreed to give the bill a third reading immediately after this division.[1] This means that the bill was passed in the House of Representatives and would now be sent to the Senate for their consideration.
  • However, in this case, the members agreed to give the bill a third reading immediately after this division.(That division is available [http://www.openaustralia.org/debates/?id=2009-03-19.67.1 here]. ) This means that the bill was passed in the House of Representatives and would now be sent to the Senate for their consideration.
  • ''Debate in Parliament''
  • The bill was introduced by Labor Party MP [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Kate_Ellis&mpc=Adelaide&house=representatives Kate Ellis], the Minister for Youth and Minister for Sport. She said that the bill delivers “the government’s election commitment to rebuild important university student services and to also ensure that students have representation on campus”.[2]
  • The bill was introduced by Labor Party MP [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Kate_Ellis&mpc=Adelaide&house=representatives Kate Ellis], the Minister for Youth and Minister for Sport. She said that the bill delivers “the government’s election commitment to rebuild important university student services and to also ensure that students have representation on campus”.(See MP Ellis' full discussion of the bill [http://www.openaustralia.org/debates/?id=2009-02-11.10.1 here]. )
  • Liberal Party MP [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Sophie_Mirabella&mpc=Indi&house=representatives Sophie Mirabella], the Shadow Minister for Youth, claimed that the bill’s "primary purpose is to impose a new tax on the one million students attending universities across the nation, whether the students are full time, part time, studying on campus or external".[3]
  • Liberal Party MP [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Sophie_Mirabella&mpc=Indi&house=representatives Sophie Mirabella], the Shadow Minister for Youth, claimed that the bill’s "primary purpose is to impose a new tax on the one million students attending universities across the nation, whether the students are full time, part time, studying on campus or external".(See MP Mirabella's contribution [http://www.openaustralia.org/debates/?id=2009-02-24.48.2 here]. )
  • ''Background to the bill''
  • Compulsory student union fees were abolished under then Prime Minister John Howard’s Coalition Government with the [http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r2283 Higher Education Support Amendment (Abolition of Compulsory Upfront Student Union Fees) Bill 2005]. This meant that universities could no longer require students to pay a compulsory fee for facilities, amenities or services that were not of an academic nature.
  • This bill aims to re-introduce a compulsory student services and amenities fee.[4]
  • This bill aims to re-introduce a compulsory student services and amenities fee.(More information about this bill and its context can be found [http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/bd/bd0809/09bd107 here].)
  • References
  • * [1] That division is available [http://www.openaustralia.org/debates/?id=2009-03-19.67.1 here].
  • * [2] See MP Ellis' full discussion of the bill [http://www.openaustralia.org/debates/?id=2009-02-11.10.1 here].
  • * [3] See MP Mirabella's contribution [http://www.openaustralia.org/debates/?id=2009-02-24.48.2 here].
  • * [4] More information about this bill and its context can be found [http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/bd/bd0809/09bd107 here].
representatives vote 2009-03-19#6

Edited by mackay

on 2014-02-17 15:14:22

Title

  • Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities, and Other Measures) Bill 2009 - Second Reading - Introduce a compulsory student services and amenities fee
  • Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities, and Other Measures) Bill 2009 - Second Reading - Read a second time

Description

  • The majority voted in favour of a [http://www.openaustralia.org/debate/?id=2009-03-19.64.33 motion] to read the bill a second time.
  • This means that the majority of members agree with the main idea of the bill.
  • <p>The Aye-voters succeeded in passing a motion to read the bill a second time.</p>
  • Someone who voted Aye supported the main idea of the bill, which was to allow universities to impose an annual capped compulsory student services and amenities fee. Since the majority voted Aye, the bill can now be discussed in greater detail.
  • <p>This means that the majority of members agreed with the main idea of the bill.</p>
  • However, in this case, the members agreed to give the bill a third reading immediately after this division.[1] This means that the bill was passed in the House of Representatives and would now be sent to the Senate for their consideration.
  • <p>Someone who voted Aye supported the main idea of the bill, which was to allow universities to impose an annual capped compulsory student services and amenities fee. Since the majority voted Aye, the bill can now be discussed in greater detail. However, in this case, <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;db=CHAMBER;id=chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-03-19%2F0111;query=Id%3A%22chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-03-19%2F0000%22">it was agreed</a> to give the bill a third reading immediately after this division. This means that the bill was passed in the House of Representatives and would now be sent to the Senate for their consideration.</p>
  • ''Debate in Parliament''
  • <p><b>Debate in Parliament</b></p>
  • The bill was introduced by Labor Party MP [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Kate_Ellis&mpc=Adelaide&house=representatives Kate Ellis], the Minister for Youth and Minister for Sport. She said that the bill delivers “the government’s election commitment to rebuild important university student services and to also ensure that students have representation on campus”.[2]
  • <p>The bill was introduced by Labor Party MP <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Kate_Ellis&mpc=Adelaide&house=representatives">Kate Ellis</a>, then Minister for Youth and Minister for Sport. <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;db=CHAMBER;id=chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-11%2F0020;query=Id%3A%22chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-11%2F0000%22">She said</a> that the bill delivers “the government’s election commitment to rebuild important university student services and to also ensure that students have representation on campus”.</p>
  • Liberal Party MP [http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Sophie_Mirabella&mpc=Indi&house=representatives Sophie Mirabella], the Shadow Minister for Youth, claimed that the bill’s "primary purpose is to impose a new tax on the one million students attending universities across the nation, whether the students are full time, part time, studying on campus or external".[3]
  • <p>Liberal Party MP <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Sophie_Mirabella&mpc=Indi&house=representatives">Sophie Mirabella</a>, then Shadow Minister for Youth, <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;db=CHAMBER;id=chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-24%2F0061;query=Id%3A%22chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-24%2F0000%22">claimed that</a> the bill’s “primary purpose is to impose a new tax on the one million students attending universities across the nation, whether the students are full time, part time, studying on campus or external.” She called it a “disgraceful return effectively to compulsory unionism”.</p>
  • ''Background to the bill''
  • <p><b>Background to the bill</b></p>
  • <p>Compulsory student union fees were abolished under then Prime Minister John Howard’s Coalition Government with the <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r2283">Higher Education Support Amendment (Abolition of Compulsory Upfront Student Union Fees) Bill 2005</a>. This meant that universities could no longer require students to pay a compulsory fee for facilities, amenities or services that were not of an academic nature.</p>
  • <p>This bill aimed to re-introduce a compulsory student services and amenities fee.</p>
  • <p>More information about this bill and its context can be found <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/bd/bd0809/09bd107">here</a>.</p>
  • Compulsory student union fees were abolished under then Prime Minister John Howard’s Coalition Government with the [http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r2283 Higher Education Support Amendment (Abolition of Compulsory Upfront Student Union Fees) Bill 2005]. This meant that universities could no longer require students to pay a compulsory fee for facilities, amenities or services that were not of an academic nature.
  • This bill aims to re-introduce a compulsory student services and amenities fee.[4]
  • References
  • * [1] That division is available [http://www.openaustralia.org/debates/?id=2009-03-19.67.1 here].
  • * [2] See MP Ellis' full discussion of the bill [http://www.openaustralia.org/debates/?id=2009-02-11.10.1 here].
  • * [3] See MP Mirabella's contribution [http://www.openaustralia.org/debates/?id=2009-02-24.48.2 here].
  • * [4] More information about this bill and its context can be found [http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/bd/bd0809/09bd107 here].
representatives vote 2009-03-19#6

Edited by mackay

on 2014-01-17 10:47:32

Title

Description

  • <p>The Aye-voters succeeded in passing a motion to read the bill a second time.</p>
  • <p>This means that the majority of members agreed with the main idea of the bill.</p>
  • <p>Someone who voted Aye supported the main idea of the bill, which was to allow universities to impose an annual capped compulsory student services and amenities fee. Since the majority voted Aye, the bill can now be discussed in greater detail. However, in this case, <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;db=CHAMBER;id=chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-03-19%2F0111;query=Id%3A%22chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-03-19%2F0000%22">it was agreed</a> to give the bill a third reading immediately after this division. This means that the bill was passed in the House of Representatives and would now be sent to the Senate for their consideration.</p>
  • <p><b>Debate in Parliament</b></p>
  • <p>The bill was introduced by Labor Party MP <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Kate_Ellis&mpc=Adelaide&house=representatives">Kate Ellis</a>, then Minister for Youth and Minister for Sport. <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;db=CHAMBER;id=chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-11%2F0020;query=Id%3A%22chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-11%2F0000%22">She said</a> that the bill delivers “the government’s election commitment to rebuild important university student services and to also ensure that students have representation on campus”.</p>
  • <p>Liberal Party MP <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22handbook%2Fallmps%2F00AMU%22;querytype=;rec=0">Sophie Mirabella</a>, then Shadow Minister for Youth, <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;db=CHAMBER;id=chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-24%2F0061;query=Id%3A%22chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-24%2F0000%22">claimed that</a> the bill’s “primary purpose is to impose a new tax on the one million students attending universities across the nation, whether the students are full time, part time, studying on campus or external.” She called it a “disgraceful return effectively to compulsory unionism”.</p>
  • <p>Liberal Party MP <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Sophie_Mirabella&mpc=Indi&house=representatives">Sophie Mirabella</a>, then Shadow Minister for Youth, <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;db=CHAMBER;id=chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-24%2F0061;query=Id%3A%22chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-24%2F0000%22">claimed that</a> the bill’s “primary purpose is to impose a new tax on the one million students attending universities across the nation, whether the students are full time, part time, studying on campus or external.” She called it a “disgraceful return effectively to compulsory unionism”.</p>
  • <p><b>Background to the bill</b></p>
  • <p>Compulsory student union fees were abolished under then Prime Minister John Howard’s Coalition Government with the <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r2283">Higher Education Support Amendment (Abolition of Compulsory Upfront Student Union Fees) Bill 2005</a>. This meant that universities could no longer require students to pay a compulsory fee for facilities, amenities or services that were not of an academic nature.</p>
  • <p>This bill aimed to re-introduce a compulsory student services and amenities fee.</p>
  • <p>More information about this bill and its context can be found <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/bd/bd0809/09bd107">here</a>.</p>
representatives vote 2009-03-19#6

Edited by mackay

on 2013-11-08 15:40:05

Title

Description

  • <p>The Aye-voters succeeded in passing a motion to read the bill a second time.</p>
  • <p>This means that the majority of members agreed with the main idea of the bill.</p>
  • <p>Someone who voted Aye supported the main idea of the bill, which was to allow universities to impose an annual capped compulsory student services and amenities fee. Since the majority voted Aye, the bill can now be discussed in greater detail. However, in this case, <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;db=CHAMBER;id=chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-03-19%2F0111;query=Id%3A%22chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-03-19%2F0000%22">it was agreed</a> to give the bill a third reading immediately after this division. This means that the bill was passed in the House of Representatives and would now be sent to the Senate for their consideration.</p>
  • <p><b>Debate in Parliament</b></p>
  • <p>The bill was introduced by Labor Party MP <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Kate_Ellis&mpc=Adelaide&house=representatives">Kate Ellis</a>, then Minister for Youth and Minister for Sport. <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;db=CHAMBER;id=chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-11%2F0020;query=Id%3A%22chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-11%2F0000%22">She said</a> that the bill delivers “the government’s election commitment to rebuild important university student services and to also ensure that students have representation on campus”.</p>
  • <p>Liberal Party MP <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22handbook%2Fallmps%2F00AMU%22;querytype=;rec=0">Sophie Mirabella</a>, then Shadow Minister for Youth, <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;db=CHAMBER;id=chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-24%2F0061;query=Id%3A%22chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-24%2F0000%22">claimed that</a> the bill’s “primary purpose is to impose a new tax on the one million students attending universities across the nation, whether the students are full time, part time, studying on campus or external.” She called it a “disgraceful return effectively to compulsory unionism”.</p>
  • <p><b>Background to the bill</b></p>
  • <p>Compulsory student union fees were abolished under then Prime Minister John Howard’s Coalition Government with the <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r2283">Higher Education Support Amendment (Abolition of Compulsory Upfront Student Union Fees) Bill 2005</a>. This meant that universities could no longer require students to pay a compulsory fee for facilities, amenities or services that were not of an academic nature.</p>
  • <p>This bill aimed to re-introduce compulsory student union fees.</p>
  • <p>This bill aimed to re-introduce a compulsory student services and amenities fee.</p>
  • <p>More information about this bill and its context can be found <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/bd/bd0809/09bd107">here</a>.</p>
representatives vote 2009-03-19#6

Edited by mackay

on 2013-11-08 14:28:40

Title

Description

  • <p>The Aye-voters succeeded in passing a motion to read the bill a second time.</p>
  • <p>This means that the majority of members agreed with the main idea of the bill.</p>
  • <p>Someone who voted Aye supported the main idea of the bill, which was to allow universities to impose an annual capped compulsory student services and amenities fee. Since the majority voted Aye, the bill can now be discussed in greater detail. However, in this case, <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;db=CHAMBER;id=chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-03-19%2F0111;query=Id%3A%22chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-03-19%2F0000%22">it was agreed</a> to give the bill a third reading immediately after this division. This means that the bill was passed in the House of Representatives and would now be sent to the Senate for their consideration.</p>
  • <p><b>Debate in Parliament</b></p>
  • <p>The bill was introduced by Labor Party MP <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Kate_Ellis&mpc=Adelaide&house=representatives">Kate Ellis</a>, then Minister for Youth and Minister for Sport. <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;db=CHAMBER;id=chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-11%2F0020;query=Id%3A%22chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-11%2F0000%22">She said</a> that the bill delivers “the government’s election commitment to rebuild important university student services and to also ensure that students have representation on campus”.</p>
  • <p>Liberal Party MP <a href=" http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22handbook%2Fallmps%2F00AMU%22;querytype=;rec=0">Sophie Mirabella</a>, then Shadow Minister for Youth, <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;db=CHAMBER;id=chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-24%2F0061;query=Id%3A%22chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-24%2F0000%22">claimed that</a> the bill’s “primary purpose is to impose a new tax on the one million students attending universities across the nation, whether the students are full time, part time, studying on campus or external.” She called it a “disgraceful return effectively to compulsory unionism”.</p>
  • <p>Liberal Party MP <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22handbook%2Fallmps%2F00AMU%22;querytype=;rec=0">Sophie Mirabella</a>, then Shadow Minister for Youth, <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;db=CHAMBER;id=chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-24%2F0061;query=Id%3A%22chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-24%2F0000%22">claimed that</a> the bill’s “primary purpose is to impose a new tax on the one million students attending universities across the nation, whether the students are full time, part time, studying on campus or external.” She called it a “disgraceful return effectively to compulsory unionism”.</p>
  • <p><b>Background to the bill</b></p>
  • <p>Compulsory student union fees were abolished under then Prime Minister John Howard’s Coalition Government with the <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r2283">Higher Education Support Amendment (Abolition of Compulsory Upfront Student Union Fees) Bill 2005</a>. This meant that universities could no longer require students to pay a compulsory fee for facilities, amenities or services that were not of an academic nature.</p>
  • <p>This bill aimed to re-introduce compulsory student union fees.</p>
  • <p>More information about this bill and its context can be found <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/bd/bd0809/09bd107">here</a>.</p>
representatives vote 2009-03-19#6

Edited by mackay

on 2013-11-08 14:27:32

Title

  • Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities, and Other Measures) Bill 2009 Second Reading
  • Higher Education Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities, and Other Measures) Bill 2009 - Second Reading - Introduce a compulsory student services and amenities fee

Description

  • <p pwmotiontext="moved">That this bill be now read a second time.</p>
  • <p pwmotiontext="moved">That this bill be now read a second time.</p>
  • <p>The Aye-voters succeeded in passing a motion to read the bill a second time.</p>
  • <p>This means that the majority of members agreed with the main idea of the bill.</p>
  • <p>Someone who voted Aye supported the main idea of the bill, which was to allow universities to impose an annual capped compulsory student services and amenities fee. Since the majority voted Aye, the bill can now be discussed in greater detail. However, in this case, <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;db=CHAMBER;id=chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-03-19%2F0111;query=Id%3A%22chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-03-19%2F0000%22">it was agreed</a> to give the bill a third reading immediately after this division. This means that the bill was passed in the House of Representatives and would now be sent to the Senate for their consideration.</p>
  • <p><b>Debate in Parliament</b></p>
  • <p>The bill was introduced by Labor Party MP <a href="http://publicwhip-test.openaustraliafoundation.org.au/mp.php?mpn=Kate_Ellis&mpc=Adelaide&house=representatives">Kate Ellis</a>, then Minister for Youth and Minister for Sport. <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;db=CHAMBER;id=chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-11%2F0020;query=Id%3A%22chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-11%2F0000%22">She said</a> that the bill delivers “the government’s election commitment to rebuild important university student services and to also ensure that students have representation on campus”.</p>
  • <p>Liberal Party MP <a href=" http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22handbook%2Fallmps%2F00AMU%22;querytype=;rec=0">Sophie Mirabella</a>, then Shadow Minister for Youth, <a href="http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;db=CHAMBER;id=chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-24%2F0061;query=Id%3A%22chamber%2Fhansardr%2F2009-02-24%2F0000%22">claimed that</a> the bill’s “primary purpose is to impose a new tax on the one million students attending universities across the nation, whether the students are full time, part time, studying on campus or external.” She called it a “disgraceful return effectively to compulsory unionism”.</p>
  • <p><b>Background to the bill</b></p>
  • <p>Compulsory student union fees were abolished under then Prime Minister John Howard’s Coalition Government with the <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/Bills_Search_Results/Result?bId=r2283">Higher Education Support Amendment (Abolition of Compulsory Upfront Student Union Fees) Bill 2005</a>. This meant that universities could no longer require students to pay a compulsory fee for facilities, amenities or services that were not of an academic nature.</p>
  • <p>This bill aimed to re-introduce compulsory student union fees.</p>
  • <p>More information about this bill and its context can be found <a href="http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Bills_Legislation/bd/bd0809/09bd107">here</a>.</p>