← Basic divisions list

These divisions relate to the policy “for Senate electoral reform”. Compare how a supporter of the policy would have voted to the division outcome.

17th Mar 2016, 5:21 PM – Senate Commonwealth Electoral Amendment Bill 2016 - Second Reading - Agree with the bill's main idea - Division No. 8

Supporters vote “Yes (strong)”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (90% turnout) 9
Australian Labor Party (63% turnout) 15
Australian Motoring Enthusiast Party (100% turnout) 1
Country Liberal Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy President (100% turnout) 1
Family First Party (100% turnout) 1
Independent (100% turnout) 3
Liberal Democratic Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (50% turnout) 1
Liberal Party (72% turnout) 18
National Party (100% turnout) 4
Nick Xenophon Team (0.0% turnout)
Palmer United Party (100% turnout) 1
President (100% turnout) 1
Totals (75% turnout) 34 23

The majority voted to agree with the bill's main idea. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to read the bill for a second time.

The Senate can now discuss the bill in more detail.

What does this bill do?

The bills digest explains that:

[This bill] constitutes the first response of the Government to the reports of the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters from its inquiry into the 2013 Federal Election, particularly in regards to the recommendations to change the Senate voting system. The recommended changes to the Senate electoral system by the Committee followed the election of senators on the basis of very small primary votes, and a perception that the group voting ticket system was being manipulated by some parties to direct preferences in a way that was not consistent with voter expectations.

The bill has three parts:

  • First, it gets rid of group voting tickets and requires citizens voting 'above the line' to allocate at least six preferences so that their vote will only be counted against the candidates they preferenced and won't go to other parties that they didn't vote for at all (note that that the bill has a savings provision "that allow voters who allocate at least one vote above the line to have their ballot paper count as formal and the preferences counted")

  • Second, it prohibits an individual from being the registered officer of more than one political party at once

  • Third, it lets parties to submit a party logo to the AEC to be added to their party registration to be printed on the ballot papers in black and white.

Read more in the bills digest.

17th Mar 2016, 3:27 PM – Representatives Commonwealth Electoral Amendment Bill 2016 - Consideration of Senate Message - Agree with Senate amendments - Division No. 2

Supporters vote “Yes (strong)”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 1
Australian Labor Party (56% turnout) 31
Country Liberal Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy Speaker (0.0% turnout)
Independent (0.0% turnout)
Katter's Australian Party (0.0% turnout)
Liberal Party (89% turnout) 65
National Party (100% turnout) 14
Palmer United Party (0.0% turnout)
Speaker (0.0% turnout)
Totals (75% turnout) 81 31

The majority voted to agree with the amendments that were made in the Senate. This means that the bill can now be passed, because both the House and the Senate have agreed to its wording.

What does this bill do?

The bills digest explains that:

[This bill] constitutes the first response of the Government to the reports of the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters from its inquiry into the 2013 Federal Election, particularly in regards to the recommendations to change the Senate voting system. The recommended changes to the Senate electoral system by the Committee followed the election of senators on the basis of very small primary votes, and a perception that the group voting ticket system was being manipulated by some parties to direct preferences in a way that was not consistent with voter expectations.

The bill has three parts:

  • First, it gets rid of group voting tickets and requires citizens voting 'above the line' to allocate at least six preferences so that their vote will only be counted against the candidates they preferenced and won't go to other parties that they didn't vote for at all (note that that the bill has a savings provision "that allow voters who allocate at least one vote above the line to have their ballot paper count as formal and the preferences counted")

  • Second, it prohibits an individual from being the registered officer of more than one political party at once

  • Third, it lets parties to submit a party logo to the AEC to be added to their party registration to be printed on the ballot papers in black and white.

Read more in the bills digest.

17th Mar 2016, 1:30 PM – Senate Commonwealth Electoral Amendment Bill 2016 - Third Reading - Pass the bill - Division No. 37

Supporters vote “Yes (strong)”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (90% turnout) 9
Australian Labor Party (67% turnout) 16
Australian Motoring Enthusiast Party (100% turnout) 1
Country Liberal Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy President (100% turnout) 1
Family First Party (100% turnout) 1
Independent (100% turnout) 1 2
Liberal Democratic Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (100% turnout) 2
Liberal Party (76% turnout) 19
National Party (75% turnout) 3
Nick Xenophon Team (0.0% turnout)
Palmer United Party (100% turnout) 1
President (100% turnout) 1
Totals (78% turnout) 36 23

The majority voted in favour of passing the bill in the Senate. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to read it for a third time.

It will now be sent back to House of Represenatives so they can decide whether or not they agree with the Senate's amendments.

What does this bill do?

The bills digest explains that:

[This bill] constitutes the first response of the Government to the reports of the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters from its inquiry into the 2013 Federal Election, particularly in regards to the recommendations to change the Senate voting system. The recommended changes to the Senate electoral system by the Committee followed the election of senators on the basis of very small primary votes, and a perception that the group voting ticket system was being manipulated by some parties to direct preferences in a way that was not consistent with voter expectations.

The bill has three parts:

  • First, it gets rid of group voting tickets and requires citizens voting 'above the line' to allocate at least six preferences so that their vote will only be counted against the candidates they preferenced and won't go to other parties that they didn't vote for at all (note that that the bill has a savings provision "that allow voters who allocate at least one vote above the line to have their ballot paper count as formal and the preferences counted")

  • Second, it prohibits an individual from being the registered officer of more than one political party at once

  • Third, it lets parties to submit a party logo to the AEC to be added to their party registration to be printed on the ballot papers in black and white.

Read more in the bills digest.

17th Mar 2016, 12:58 PM – Senate Commonwealth Electoral Amendment Bill 2016 - in Committee - Agree to the bill - Division No. 34

Supporters vote “Yes (strong)”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (90% turnout) 9
Australian Labor Party (71% turnout) 17
Australian Motoring Enthusiast Party (100% turnout) 1
Country Liberal Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy President (100% turnout) 1
Family First Party (100% turnout) 1
Independent (100% turnout) 1 2
Liberal Democratic Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (100% turnout) 2
Liberal Party (80% turnout) 20
National Party (75% turnout) 3
Nick Xenophon Team (0.0% turnout)
Palmer United Party (100% turnout) 1
President (100% turnout) 1
Totals (80% turnout) 37 24

The majority voted to agree with the bill as amended. The Senate will now stop discussing it in detail and decide whether to pass it (known as giving the bill a third reading).

What does this bill do?

The bills digest explains that:

[This bill] constitutes the first response of the Government to the reports of the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters from its inquiry into the 2013 Federal Election, particularly in regards to the recommendations to change the Senate voting system. The recommended changes to the Senate electoral system by the Committee followed the election of senators on the basis of very small primary votes, and a perception that the group voting ticket system was being manipulated by some parties to direct preferences in a way that was not consistent with voter expectations.

The bill has three parts:

  • First, it gets rid of group voting tickets and requires citizens voting 'above the line' to allocate at least six preferences so that their vote will only be counted against the candidates they preferenced and won't go to other parties that they didn't vote for at all (note that that the bill has a savings provision "that allow voters who allocate at least one vote above the line to have their ballot paper count as formal and the preferences counted")

  • Second, it prohibits an individual from being the registered officer of more than one political party at once

  • Third, it lets parties to submit a party logo to the AEC to be added to their party registration to be printed on the ballot papers in black and white.

Read more in the bills digest.

2nd Mar 2016, 11:45 AM – Senate Commonwealth Electoral Amendment Bill 2016 - First Reading - Read for the first time - Division No. 7

Supporters vote “Yes (strong)”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 10
Australian Labor Party (92% turnout) 22
Australian Motoring Enthusiast Party (100% turnout) 1
Country Liberal Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy President (100% turnout) 1
Family First Party (100% turnout) 1
Independent (100% turnout) 3
Liberal Democratic Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (100% turnout) 2
Liberal Party (92% turnout) 22
National Party (100% turnout) 4
Nick Xenophon Team (0.0% turnout)
Palmer United Party (100% turnout) 1
President (100% turnout) 1
Totals (93% turnout) 40 30

The majority voted in favour of reading the bill for a first time. In other words, the majority were in favour of formerly introducing the bill in to the Senate.

According to Odgers’ Australian Senate Practice:

the first reading is normally passed without opposition and is regarded as a purely formal stage

So, the fact that the Senate divided to vote on this motion (rather than voting 'on the voices', like normal) shows that this bill was rather controversial.

What does this bill do?

The bills digest explains that:

[This bill] constitutes the first response of the Government to the reports of the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters from its inquiry into the 2013 Federal Election, particularly in regards to the recommendations to change the Senate voting system. The recommended changes to the Senate electoral system by the Committee followed the election of senators on the basis of very small primary votes, and a perception that the group voting ticket system was being manipulated by some parties to direct preferences in a way that was not consistent with voter expectations.

The bill has three parts:

  • First, it gets rid of group voting tickets and requires citizens voting 'above the line' to allocate at least six preferences so that their vote will only be counted against the candidates they preferenced and won't go to other parties that they didn't vote for at all (note that that the bill has a savings provision "that allow voters who allocate at least one vote above the line to have their ballot paper count as formal and the preferences counted")

  • Second, it prohibits an individual from being the registered officer of more than one political party at once

  • Third, it lets parties to submit a party logo to the AEC to be added to their party registration to be printed on the ballot papers in black and white.

Read more in the bills digest.

24th Feb 2016, 4:49 PM – Representatives Commonwealth Electoral Amendment Bill 2016 - Second Reading - Agree with the main idea - Division No. 1

Supporters vote “Yes (strong)”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 1
Australian Labor Party (84% turnout) 46
Country Liberal Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy Speaker (100% turnout) 1
Independent (150% turnout) 2 1
Katter's Australian Party (0.0% turnout)
Liberal Party (88% turnout) 64
National Party (100% turnout) 14
Palmer United Party (0.0% turnout)
Speaker (0.0% turnout)
Totals (87% turnout) 83 47

The majority voted to agree with the bill's main idea. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to read the bill for a second time.

The House can now discuss the bill in more detail.

What does this bill do?

The bills digest explains that:

[This bill] constitutes the first response of the Government to the reports of the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters from its inquiry into the 2013 Federal Election, particularly in regards to the recommendations to change the Senate voting system. The recommended changes to the Senate electoral system by the Committee followed the election of senators on the basis of very small primary votes, and a perception that the group voting ticket system was being manipulated by some parties to direct preferences in a way that was not consistent with voter expectations.

The bill has three parts:

  • First, it gets rid of group voting tickets and requires citizens voting 'above the line' to allocate at least six preferences so that their vote will only be counted against the candidates they preferenced and won't go to other parties that they didn't vote for at all (note that that the bill has a savings provision "that allow voters who allocate at least one vote above the line to have their ballot paper count as formal and the preferences counted")

  • Second, it prohibits an individual from being the registered officer of more than one political party at once

  • Third, it lets parties to submit a party logo to the AEC to be added to their party registration to be printed on the ballot papers in black and white.

Read more in the bills digest.