← Basic divisions list

These divisions relate to the policy “for reducing air pollution”. Compare how a supporter of the policy would have voted to the division outcome.

27th Nov 2018, 1:58 PM – Senate Road Vehicle Standards Bill 2018 and others - Second Reading - Reduce vehicle emissions - Division No. 4

Supporters vote “Yes”

Party Yes No
Australian Conservatives (100% turnout) 1
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 9
Australian Labor Party (76% turnout) 19
Centre Alliance (100% turnout) 2
Country Liberal Party (100% turnout) 1
Derryn Hinch's Justice Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy President (100% turnout) 1
Independent (100% turnout) 1 2
Liberal Democratic Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (100% turnout) 2
Liberal Party (65% turnout) 15
National Party (100% turnout) 3
Pauline Hanson's One Nation Party (100% turnout) 2
President (100% turnout) 1
United Australia Party (0.0% turnout)
Totals (80% turnout) 32 29

The majority voted in favour of an amendment to the usual second reading motion, which is "that the bill be read a second time". That is parliamentary jargon for agreeing with the main idea of the bill. The amendment was introduced by Victorian Senator Janet Rice (Greens).

Motion text

At the end of the motion, add:

", but the Senate notes that:

(a) the Ministerial Forum on Vehicle Emissions was established in October 2015 to address emissions from motor vehicles;

(b) the Draft Regulation Impact Statement on Vehicle emissions standards for cleaner air released by the Ministerial Forum notes that:

(i) Australia is estimated to have experienced a 68 per cent increase in deaths attributable to air pollution during the period 2005 to 2010, with total of 1,483 deaths in 2010; and

(ii) it is suggested that, in OECD countries, road transport accounts for approximately half of the cost of the health impact of air pollution (including these preventable deaths);

(c) while the Prime Minister insists that we will meet our Paris targets 'in a canter', the transport sector is now responsible for 19 per cent of Australian greenhouse gas emissions and has continued to grow in emissions year on year since 2001;

(d) despite two discussion papers, three draft regulation impact statements, two additional reports and over three years of work, there has been no substantive government action to reduce emissions from motor vehicles; and

(e) the Government has proven itself completely unable to deliver meaningful reductions in vehicle emissions and therefore cannot be trusted to reduce deaths from vehicle pollution or meet our international climate change obligations."

15th Aug 2018, 5:21 PM – Senate Regulations and Determinations - Product Emissions Standards (Excise) Charges Regulations 2018, Product Emissions Standards (Customs) Charges Regulations 2018 - Disallow - Division No. 7

Supporters vote “No”

Party Yes No
Australian Conservatives (100% turnout) 1
Australian Greens (89% turnout) 8
Australian Labor Party (64% turnout) 16
Centre Alliance (100% turnout) 2
Country Liberal Party (0.0% turnout)
Derryn Hinch's Justice Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy President (100% turnout) 1
Independent (150% turnout) 3
Katter's Australian Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal Democratic Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (0.0% turnout)
Liberal Party (52% turnout) 12
National Party (33% turnout) 1
Nick Xenophon Team (100% turnout) 2
Pauline Hanson's One Nation Party (100% turnout) 2
President (0.0% turnout)
United Australia Party (0.0% turnout)
Totals (64% turnout) 6 45

The majority voted against a motion to disallow two regulations, which means it failed. These regulations address the negative impacts of air pollution from certain products on human and environmental health.

This motion was moved by South Australian Senator Cory Bernardi, who explained that:

In essence, they [the regulations] are the carbon tax on whipper-snippers, lawnmowers and outboard engines that were identified at the very passage of this bill and yet they were blithely championed through and sponsored through in the absence of a great deal of information and supported by people who said they had nothing whatsoever to do with the climate agreement reached in Paris. They were wrong.

Motion text

That the Product Emissions Standards (Excise) Charges Regulations 2018, made under the Product Emissions Standards (Excise) Charges Act 2017, and the Product Emissions Standards (Customs) Charges Regulations 2018, made under the Product Emissions Standards (Customs) Charges Act 2017, be disallowed.

10th May 2018, 12:44 PM – Senate Interstate Road Transport Legislation (Repeal) Bill 2018 - Second Reading - Address emissions - Division No. 4

Supporters vote “Yes”

Party Yes No
Australian Conservatives (100% turnout) 1
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 9
Australian Labor Party (54% turnout) 13
Centre Alliance (0.0% turnout)
Country Liberal Party (100% turnout) 1
Derryn Hinch's Justice Party (100% turnout) 1
Deputy President (100% turnout) 1
Independent (100% turnout) 1 2
Liberal Democratic Party (0.0% turnout)
Liberal National Party (50% turnout) 1
Liberal Party (61% turnout) 14
National Party (33% turnout) 1
Nick Xenophon Team (100% turnout) 2
Pauline Hanson's One Nation Party (33% turnout) 1
President (0.0% turnout)
Totals (64% turnout) 12 36

The majority voted against a motion that would have added certain words (see below) to the usual second reading motion that the Senate read the bill for a second time (which means that the Senate agree with the bill's main idea).

Motion text

At the end of the motion, add:

", but the Senate:

(a) notes that:

(i) approximately 3000 Australians die from the effects of air pollution each year;

(ii) the transport sector is accountable for nearly 19 per cent of Australia's greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to ongoing and dangerous climate change;

(iii) Australia is not compliant with the International Energy Agency's 90 day stockholding requirement of liquid fuels; and

(b) calls on the Government to:

(i) introduce Euro VI standards for light and heavy vehicles at the earliest possible opportunity;

(ii) immediately begin work on the design and implementation of a heavy vehicle fuel efficiency standard; and

(iii) develop a plan for Australia's transition to electric and other zero emission transport for freight.".

19th Apr 2016, 6:49 PM – Senate Motions - Public Transport - Prioritise funding - Division No. 9

Supporters vote “Yes”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (90% turnout) 9
Australian Labor Party (61% turnout) 14
Australian Motoring Enthusiast Party (100% turnout) 1
Country Liberal Party (0.0% turnout)
Deputy President (0.0% turnout)
Family First Party (0.0% turnout)
Independent (130% turnout) 1 3
Liberal Democratic Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (0.0% turnout)
Liberal Party (52% turnout) 13
National Party (50% turnout) 2
Nick Xenophon Team (0.0% turnout)
Palmer United Party (0.0% turnout)
President (100% turnout) 1
Totals (60% turnout) 10 35

The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Janet Rice (Vic), which means it was rejected.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) the Turnbull Government is yet to commit funding to any major public transport projects in our urban centres,

(ii) the recent audit of East West Link federal funding showed significant flaws in the Liberal Government's approvals and funding decisions for that proposed project, and that there are strikingly similar features of the funding decisions for WestConnex and Perth Freight Link toll roads,

(iii) communities in Sydney, Perth and Melbourne are standing up and saying they do not want more polluting toll roads pushed through their urban neighbourhoods, and

(iv) investment in well designed public transport infrastructure is a more effective, economic, equitable and less polluting means of tackling congestion than new toll road projects; and

(b) calls on the Government to withdraw funding for WestConnex and the Perth Freight Link, and prioritise funding for public transport in our major urban centres before polluting toll roads that further embed car dependence in our cities.

24th Nov 2014, 4:59 PM – Senate Motions - Westconnex - Don't construct WestConnex - Division No. 6

Supporters vote “Yes”

Party Yes No
Australian Greens (100% turnout) 10
Australian Labor Party (83% turnout) 20
Australian Motoring Enthusiast Party (0.0% turnout)
Country Liberal Party (0.0% turnout)
Deputy President (0.0% turnout)
Family First Party (100% turnout) 1
Independent (150% turnout) 3
Liberal Democratic Party (100% turnout) 1
Liberal National Party (100% turnout) 2
Liberal Party (72% turnout) 18
National Party (100% turnout) 4
Nick Xenophon Team (0.0% turnout)
Palmer United Party (100% turnout) 2
President (100% turnout) 1
Totals (82% turnout) 10 52

The majority disagreed that "the Federal and NSW Governments [should] abandon their plans to construct the WestConnex motorway and commit to building public transport in Sydney to minimise congestion, improve environmental sustainability and boost productivity" (see the motion).

Wording of the motion

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) the Federal Government has provided $1.5 billion in funding for the WestConnex motorway, plus an additional $2 billion in the form a concessional loan; and that this funding was awarded despite the lack of a detailed business case, including the assumptions behind the project's cost-benefit analysis, being made available to Infrastructure Australia or the public,

(ii) the WestConnex motorway, if built, will negatively impact residents and commuters across Sydney by increasing traffic congestion and air pollution; and the main beneficiaries of the project will be private businesses who will profit from new tolls while the public wears the financial risk, and

(iii) the Federal Government has not spent a single dollar on public transport projects in Sydney; and

(b) calls on the Federal and NSW Governments to abandon their plans to construct the WestConnex motorway and commit to building public transport in Sydney to minimise congestion, improve environmental sustainability and boost productivity.