How Raff Ciccone voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should address the causes and consequences of climate change as a matter of urgency by, for example, lowering emissions and investing in science and technology

Division Raff Ciccone Supporters vote Division outcome

5th Dec 2019, 12:25 PM – Senate Motions - New South Wales Bushfires - Declare climate emergency

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by NSW Senator Mehreen Faruqi (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes with deep concern that:

(i) over a hundred fires continue to burn across New South Wales,

(ii) data from the New South Wales Department of Environment shows harmful pollutants in Sydney's air are already over three times worse than at any moment in the past five years during bushfire season,

(iii) the toxicity of the air in some parts of Sydney is the equivalent of smoking between four and ten cigarettes a day,

(iv) particle pollution can trigger heart attacks, strokes, lung cancer and asthma attacks,

(v) New South Wales Health has stated that bushfires were to blame for an increase in people presenting to emergency departments with asthma and breathing difficulties, and

(vi) Mr Greg Mullins, the former chief of NSW Fire and Rescue, has stated that 'climate change has supercharged the bushfire problem' and that 'if anyone tells you this is part of a normal cycle or we've had fires like this before smile politely and walk away, because they don't know what they're talking about'; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to protect the health of the people of New South Wales and declare a climate emergency.

Yes Yes Not passed by a small majority

4th Dec 2019, 4:34 PM – Senate Motions - Climate Change - Public Health

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Victorian Senator Richard Di Natale (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) acknowledges that the Australian Medical Association, the Royal Australasian College of Physicians, the Australian College of Emergency Medicine and the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine, representing more than 50,000 Australian doctors, have all declared climate change a public health emergency;

(b) recognises that these highly-respected health and medical organisations have stated that climate change now poses an unprecedented and deadly threat to human lives, and have urgently called on all governments to address the climate emergency by:

(i) expediting the transition from fossil fuels to zero emission renewable energy across all economic sectors, with support to affected communities,

(ii) developing and implementing a national climate change and health strategy based on the framework developed by the health sector, and

(iii) advancing comprehensive heat hazard reduction strategies to minimise heat exposure and sensitivity across Australia, paying particular attention to the needs of vulnerable populations;

(c) further acknowledges that, through the Climate and Health Alliance, more than 50 health, social welfare and conservation groups have joined together in an open letter to the Parliament, to highlight the unprecedented and profound threat of climate change on the health of people and the health system; and

(d) calls on the Federal Government to listen to the experts, and act now to follow the 965 jurisdictions in 18 countries that have already declared a climate emergency, and take the urgent actions required to protect human and environmental health.

Yes Yes Not passed by a small majority

3rd Dec 2019, 4:00 PM – Senate Motions - Great Barrier Reef - Climate change

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Queensland Senator Larissa Waters (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

(a) notes that:

(i) on 1 December 2019, the Federal Government submitted the State Party Report on the state of conservation report of the Great Barrier Reef (the Reef) World Heritage Area,

(ii) the State Party Report responds to the World Heritage Committee Decision in 2015, requesting the Government to outline how the Reef's Outstanding Universal Value is being protected to avert a World Heritage In Danger listing,

(iii) the State Party Report recognises that mass coral bleaching events in 2016 and 2017, tropical cyclones, flooding, and crown-of-thorns starfish have impacted the Outstanding Universal Value of the Reef since 2015,

(iv) the Great Barrier Reef outlook report 2019 found that the long-term outlook for the Reef 's ecosystem has deteriorated from poor to very poor, and climate change and land-based run-off remain the key threats,

(v) the State Party Report states that the Government is 'actively managing the pressures over which we have direct control through investment and regulation based on the best available science',

(vi) United Nations scientific reports have confirmed that if global temperature rises by 1.5°C, 90% of coral in the Reef will be lost and 100% of coral will be lost at 2.0°C,

(vii) the Government has established a Senate inquiry questioning the water science informing regulation of land-based run-off into the Reef,

(viii) Government representatives have advocated for the removal of climate change threats as a consideration for World Heritage In Danger listing decisions, and

(ix) fossil fuel companies have donated nearly $5 million to the Liberals, Nationals and Labor parties over the past four years; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to:

(i) implement a climate policy to limit global warming to 1.5°C to protect the Great Barrier Reef,

(ii) manage the key pressures over which it has control by revoking all federal approvals for the Adani Carmichael mine and not approve any new coal in Australia, and

(iii) ban corporate donations to political parties from the fossil fuel industry, an industry which financially benefits from this Federal Government's lack of action on climate change.

absent Yes Not passed by a large majority

2nd Dec 2019, 5:45 PM – Senate Matters of Urgency - Climate Change - Work together

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by NT Senator Malarndirri McCarthy (Labor), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate:

(1) notes:

(a) Monday 2 December 2019 marks ten years since the Senate failed to pass legislation for a comprehensive economy wide climate change policy, the Rudd Labor government's Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme (CPRS);

(b) that implementation of the CPRS would have resulted in Australia's greenhouse gas emissions being between 27 and 81 million tonnes lower in 2020 than currently projected, would have delivered additional cumulative abatement of between 63 and 218 million tonnes over the last 10 years, and would have placed Australian emissions on a sustained and long term downward trajectory;

(c) in addition to Labor senators, the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme bills were supported by Liberal senators Sue Boyce and Judith Troeth;

(d) despite the constructive negotiations engaged in by Mr Malcolm Turnbull and Mr Ian Macfarlane, the Liberals and Nationals opposed the bills under the leadership of Mr Tony Abbott;

(e) the Australian Greens joined with the Liberals and Nationals and also opposed the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme, guaranteeing its defeat;

(2) recognises the decision by the Liberals and Nationals and the Australian Greens to join together and oppose the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme precipitated:

(a) a breakdown in consensus on policy in Australia to address the challenges of climate change;

(b) a decade of policy instability preventing necessary investment in energy infrastructure leading to increases in energy prices and increased emissions; and

(3) calls on all parties to end the political opportunism and work together to agree an enduring solution to the challenges of climate change.

Yes Yes Not passed by a small majority

2nd Dec 2019, 4:36 PM – Senate Motions - Climate Change - Work together

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Tasmanian Senator Anne Urquhart (Labor) at the request of SA Senator Penny Wong (Labor), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) 2 December 2019 marks ten years since the Senate failed to pass legislation for a comprehensive economy-wide climate change policy, the Rudd Labor Government's Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme (CPRS),

(ii) implementation of the CPRS would have resulted in Australia's greenhouse gas emissions being between 27 and 81 million tonnes lower in 2020 than currently projected, would have delivered additional cumulative abatement of between 63 and 218 million tonnes over the last 10 years, and would have placed Australian emissions on a sustained and long-term downward trajectory,

(iii) in addition to Labor senators, the CPRS bills were supported by Liberal Senators Boyce and Troeth,

(iv) despite the constructive negotiations engaged in by Mr Turnbull and Mr Macfarlane, the Liberals and the Nationals opposed the bills under the leadership of Mr Abbott, and

(v) the Australian Greens joined with the Liberals and the Nationals, and also opposed the CPRS, guaranteeing its defeat;

(b) recognises the decision by the Liberals, the Nationals and the Australian Greens to join together to oppose the CPRS precipitated:

(i) a breakdown in consensus on policy in Australia to address the challenges of climate change, and

(ii) a decade of policy instability preventing necessary investment in energy infrastructure leading to increases in energy prices and increased emissions; and

(c) calls on all parties to end the political opportunism and work together to agree an enduring solution to the challenges of climate change.

Yes Yes Not passed by a small majority

13th Nov 2019, 4:49 PM – Senate Motions - Australian Bushfires - Climate Change

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by NSW Senator Mehreen Faruqi (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) states of emergency have been declared in New South Wales and Queensland due to catastrophic bushfire risk,

(ii) lives have been lost, more than 150 homes have been destroyed, and almost 1,000,000 hectares of land in New South Wales have been razed since the start of this year's unprecedented bushfire season,

(iii) in New South Wales, the Greater Sydney and Hunter areas are set to experience catastrophic fire conditions for the first time on record,

(iv) in Queensland, a state of emergency has been declared in 42 local government areas across the south east and central Queensland, with at least 11,000 hectares and more than a dozen homes lost,

(v) the climate crisis is making bushfires like these more frequent and more intense, and making fire seasons longer and more dangerous each year, and

(vi) burning coal, oil and gas is dangerously heating our planet, and Australia is the third largest exporter of carbon pollution in the world;

(b) expresses its whole-hearted support for communities across New South Wales and Queensland devastated by these raging bushfires;

(c) thanks the courageous firefighters and emergency services for their service to communities in need; and

(d) calls on the Federal Government to:

(i) act decisively to build resilience in communities, and

(ii) declare a climate emergency.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

17th Oct 2019, 12:48 PM – Senate Motions - Thermal Coal - Ban new mines

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Tasmanian Senator Peter Whish-Wilson (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate agrees that, given we are in a climate emergency, no new thermal coal mines should be opened.

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

16th Oct 2019, 4:40 PM – Senate Motions - Climate Change, Petroleum Industry - No new coal, oil or gas projects

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by West Australian Senator Rachel Siewert (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) acknowledges that the very first step in dealing with the climate crisis is that no new coal, oil or gas projects can be built;

(b) notes the in-depth research by the International Energy Agency that global carbon budgets cannot afford a single new coal, oil or gas project to proceed in order to stay below 1 degrees of warming, as committed to under the Paris Agreement; and

(c) concludes that the Adani coalmine in Queensland, fracking the Beetaloo Gas Basin in the Northern Territory and drilling for oil in the Great Australian Bight are incompatible with any declaration of a climate emergency.

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

16th Oct 2019, 4:12 PM – Senate Motions - Climate Change - Address

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The same number of senators voted for and against a motion introduced by Tasmanian Senator Anne Urquhart (Labor), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) climate change is a significant threat to our economy, natural environment, farming communities and national security,

(ii) Australia's annual emissions have been rising in recent years,

(iii) as a global problem, the solution to climate change requires concerted international cooperation to limit the production of greenhouse gasses,

(iv) as the only global agreement designed to address climate change, the Paris accords must play a central role in addressing climate change,

(v) the Paris accords require signatory countries to deliver actions consistent with keeping the global temperature rise this century to well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase to 1 degrees celsius,

(vi) based on the latest scientific advice, the world is currently on track for warming of above 3 degrees, and efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions need to be strengthened to avoid catastrophic climate change impacts, and

(vii) as a result of the threat posed by climate change, the United Kingdom, Canada, France, Portugal, Argentina and the Republic of Ireland have declared a climate emergency; and

(b) affirms that:

(i) Australia remains committed to delivering on its obligations under the Paris accords,

(ii) failing to meet the goals of the Paris accords would have unprecedented and devastating environmental, economic, societal and health impacts for Australia, and

(iii) the threat posed by climate change on the future prosperity and security of Australia and the globe constitutes a climate change emergency.

Yes Yes Not passed

16th Oct 2019, 4:08 PM – Senate Motions - Climate Change - Climate emergecy

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The same number of senators voted for and against an amendment to a motion, which means it failed.

Amendment text

(1) After paragraph (b), add paragraph (c):

(c) declares an environment and climate emergency.

Yes Yes (strong) Not passed

15th Oct 2019, 5:11 PM – Senate Motions - Tasmania: Mining - Prohibition

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Tasmanian Senator Nick McKim, also on behalf of Tasmanian Senator Peter Whish-Wilson, which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) thermal coal combustion is a key driver of increasing greenhouse gas emissions and rising global temperatures,

(ii) the impact the current level of global warming of just 1 degrees is having on Tasmania includes worsening floods, East Coast drought, marine heatwaves, increased dry lightning storms causing bushfires, coastal erosion, biosecurity threats and ecosystem stress,

(iii) the scientific consensus is that the burning of fossil fuels, such as coal, must end in order to limit global warming to 2 degrees and prevent further climate breakdown,

(iv) Western Australian-based Midland Energy has received around $50,000, and Queensland-based Junction Coal around $23,000, in grants from the Tasmanian Government for coal exploration in Tasmania, and

(v) it is in Tasmania's best interest to be a climate positive, clean energy island, and that any new coal mines would harm the agricultural and tourism sectors; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to implement a prohibition on any new thermal coal mines in Tasmania.

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

14th Oct 2019, 3:46 PM – Senate Motions - Bylong Valley Coalmine - Protect Bylong Valley

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by NSW Senator Mehreen Faruqi (Greens) also on behalf of Queensland Senator Larissa Waters, which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) the New South Wales Independent Planning Commission (the Commission) has rejected the development of the Bylong Valley coal mine near Mudgee in New South Wales, citing concerns about the long-lasting environmental, agricultural and heritage impacts of the proposed coal mine;

(ii) the Commission raised serious concerns about the proposed mine, including groundwater contamination and the mine's contribution to climate change through greenhouse gas emissions; and

(iii) the Commission also raised concerns about the intergenerational inequity of environmental costs associated with the proposal, saying that younger generations would have to bear the heavy environmental, agricultural and heritage costs of the proposed coal mine; and

(b) congratulates the community, who have been campaigning for years to protect the Bylong Valley from coal mining.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

10th Sep 2019, 6:44 PM – Senate Matters of Urgency - Climate Change - Action needed

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The same number of senators voted for and against a motion introduced by Queensland Senator Larissa Waters, which means it failed.

Motion text

Pursuant to standing order 75, I give notice that today I propose to move "That, in the opinion of the Senate, the following is a matter of urgency:

We are facing an existential climate crisis that threatens human civilisation and the government needs to act, starting by supporting the global climate strike on 20 September."

Yes Yes (strong) Not passed

10th Sep 2019, 4:17 PM – Senate Motions - Queensland - Bushfires

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Queensland Senator Larissa Waters (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes:

(i) that just one week after winter, Queensland is experiencing unprecedented and devastating bushfires and facing what the fire service has described as the most catastrophic bushfire season in recorded history,

(ii) that hundreds of people have been affected by the devastating fires—to date, 80 properties have been reported as damaged or destroyed, including the heritage-listed Bina Burra resort, and prior to these bushfires, a total of 40 properties had been lost to bushfire in Queensland in the previous 130 years,

(iii) the critical role that firefighting and emergency services personnel play in the frontline response to emergencies and climate-related disasters,

(iv) that the Bushfire and Natural Hazard Cooperative Research Centre's latest Seasonal Bushfire Outlook, August 2019, confirmed that Queensland fire seasons have been starting earlier and persisting longer since 1990,

(v) that drought conditions and severe water shortages in the Darling Downs and Granite Belt are expected to make fighting bushfires even more difficult across the summer, and

(vi) that, unless urgent action is taken to reduce harmful emissions and stop further global warming, bushfires, drought, and heatwaves will become more frequent and severe, putting Australian lives and properties at risk; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to:

(i) urgently take action to address climate change and manage the risk and severity of bushfires,

(ii) invest in community adaptation efforts to build resilience to climate change in moderate and high risk areas, and

(iii) commit to action to progress a rapid and just transition to clean and renewable energy sources to reduce the harmful emissions driving climate change.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

9th Sep 2019, 4:55 PM – Senate Motions - Fossil Fuel Basins - Halt development

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by WA Senator Rachel Siewert (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that, on 31 July 2019, offshore petroleum exploration acreage was released, containing 64 areas available for lease:

(i) this is largest number of areas released since 2000, with more than 120,000 square kilometres available, and

(ii) fossil fuels are the leading cause of climate change; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to halt the development of any further fossil fuel basins.

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

24th Jul 2019, 3:47 PM – Senate Motions - Great Barrier Reef - Protect from climate change

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Queensland Senator Larissa Waters (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) on 17 July 2019, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority released a Position Statement on Climate Change, which stated: 'climate change is the greatest threat to the Great Barrier Reef. Only the strongest and fastest possible actions to decrease global greenhouse gas emissions will reduce the risks and limit the impacts of climate change on the Reef'... 'If we are to secure a future for the Great Barrier Reef and coral reef ecosystems globally, there is an urgent and critical need to accelerate actions to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. This must happen in parallel to taking actions to build the Reef's resilience',

(ii) in an address to the British Parliament on 9 July 2019, Sir David Attenborough criticised Australia for not taking the risks of climate change seriously, and imperilling the Great Barrier Reef,

(iii) at its meeting in 2015, the UNESCO World Heritage Committee gave the Australian Government five years to address the state of the Great Barrier Reef before it re-considered whether to include it on the World Heritage In Danger list—the Australian Government is due to submit a report addressing the protection of the Reef's Outstanding Universal Value to avert an In Danger listing by 1 December 2019,

(iv) scientific reports confirm that approximately half of the shallow water coral of the Great Barrier Reef has been lost since 2016 due to successive coral bleaching incidents,

(v) the Association of Marine Park Tourism Operators has signed a Reef Climate Declaration that acknowledges climate change as "the single biggest threat to the Great Barrier Reef" and states that "Australia must join the rest of the world to rapidly phase out coal and other fossil fuels and transition to renewable energy",

(vi) the Great Barrier Reef supports approximately 64,000 jobs and generates $6 billion for the Australian economy annually,

(vii) the science and the economics are clear that these jobs are at risk if strong action is not taken immediately to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and limit global temperature rises to 1.5°C, and

(viii) fossil fuel companies have donated nearly $5 million to the Liberals, The Nationals and Labor parties over the past four years; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to:

(i) affirm the advice of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority that climate change is the greatest threat to the Great Barrier Reef,

(ii) direct Mr Warren Entsch, Special Envoy for the Great Barrier Reef, to prioritise actions that reduce greenhouse gas emissions,

(iii) implement a climate policy that accelerates actions to limit global warming to 1.5°C to protect the Great Barrier Reef,

(iv) take all action necessary to properly protect the Great Barrier Reef and avoid the UNESCO World Heritage Committee needing to place the Great Barrier Reef on the World Heritage In Danger list,

(v) revoke all federal approvals for the Adani Carmichael mine and not approve any new coal in Australia, and

(vi) develop a clear plan to move towards 100% clean energy, including a plan for a just transition for Australia's regional workforces affected by climate change so that regional economies can thrive and workers are protected, and ban corporate donations to political parties from the fossil fuel industry, an industry which financially benefits from this Government's lack of action on climate change.

absent Yes Not passed by a modest majority

24th Jul 2019, 12:19 PM – Senate Future Drought Fund Bill 2019 and another - in Committee - Fossil fuels

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The majority voted against amendments introduced by Victorian Senator Janet Rice (Greens), which means it failed.

Senator Rice explained that:

These amendments are a very significant way of doing something about [climate change]—of actually making sure that the drought fund that is going to be repairing the impacts of climate change is not, at the same time, investing in the very things that are causing it. These amendments on sheet 8704 would mean that the drought fund would not invest in coal and gas and oil. Furthermore, that would then be included in the investment mandate for this fund, and furthermore these amendments say that this fund should again be a disallowable instrument, to make sure that the investment mandate is as it should be—that it is taking the reality of our climate catastrophe into account.

Motion text

(1) Clause 5, page 8 (after line 25), after the definition of person, insert:

prohibited financial asset: a financial asset is a prohibited financial asset if the financial asset includes an interest in a body corporate that produces fossil fuels.

(2) Clause 39, page 41 (line 23), at the end of subclause (1), add "that are not prohibited financial assets".

(3) Clause 41, page 43 (line 30) to page 44 (line 6), omit subclause (7), substitute:

(7) A direction under subsection (1) is a legislative instrument.

(8) Despite regulations made for the purposes of paragraphs 44(2) (b) and 54(2) (b) of the Legislation Act 2003, section 42 (disallowance) and Part 4 of Chapter 3 (sunsetting) of that Act apply to a direction under subsection (1).

(4) Heading to clause 54, page 50 (line 25), at the end of the heading, add "etc.".

(5) Clause 54, page 50 (line 31), at the end of subclause (1), add:

; or (c) an asset held by the Board as an investment of the Future Drought Fund is, or has become, a prohibited financial asset.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

24th Jul 2019, 10:43 AM – Senate Future Drought Fund Bill 2019 and another - Second Reading - Climate crisis

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Tasmanian Senator Peter Whish-Wilson (Greens), which means it failed. The motion would have amended the usual second reading motion, which is that "the bills be read for a second time". This is parliamentary jargon for agreeing with the main idea of the bill.

Motion text

At the end of the motion, add:

", but the Senate:

(a) notes that the Bureau of Meteorology has stated that:

(i) the current drought in the Murray-Darling Basin is the most severe in 120 years of records; and

(ii) climate change is a significant cause of the severity of the drought; and

(b) calls on the Government to recognise that we are in the middle of a climate crisis which has implications for droughts in this country."

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

How "voted moderately for" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 2 100 100
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 5 50 50
MP voted against policy 9 0 90
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 2 2 4
Total: 152 244

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 152 / 244 = 62%.

And then