How Kim Carr voted compared to someone who believes that in light of the threat of climate change, the federal government should make as rapid a transition to renewable energy as possible

Division Kim Carr Supporters vote Division outcome

3rd Dec 2019, 4:00 PM – Senate Motions - Great Barrier Reef - Climate change

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Queensland Senator Larissa Waters (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

(a) notes that:

(i) on 1 December 2019, the Federal Government submitted the State Party Report on the state of conservation report of the Great Barrier Reef (the Reef) World Heritage Area,

(ii) the State Party Report responds to the World Heritage Committee Decision in 2015, requesting the Government to outline how the Reef's Outstanding Universal Value is being protected to avert a World Heritage In Danger listing,

(iii) the State Party Report recognises that mass coral bleaching events in 2016 and 2017, tropical cyclones, flooding, and crown-of-thorns starfish have impacted the Outstanding Universal Value of the Reef since 2015,

(iv) the Great Barrier Reef outlook report 2019 found that the long-term outlook for the Reef 's ecosystem has deteriorated from poor to very poor, and climate change and land-based run-off remain the key threats,

(v) the State Party Report states that the Government is 'actively managing the pressures over which we have direct control through investment and regulation based on the best available science',

(vi) United Nations scientific reports have confirmed that if global temperature rises by 1.5°C, 90% of coral in the Reef will be lost and 100% of coral will be lost at 2.0°C,

(vii) the Government has established a Senate inquiry questioning the water science informing regulation of land-based run-off into the Reef,

(viii) Government representatives have advocated for the removal of climate change threats as a consideration for World Heritage In Danger listing decisions, and

(ix) fossil fuel companies have donated nearly $5 million to the Liberals, Nationals and Labor parties over the past four years; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to:

(i) implement a climate policy to limit global warming to 1.5°C to protect the Great Barrier Reef,

(ii) manage the key pressures over which it has control by revoking all federal approvals for the Adani Carmichael mine and not approve any new coal in Australia, and

(iii) ban corporate donations to political parties from the fossil fuel industry, an industry which financially benefits from this Federal Government's lack of action on climate change.

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

10th Sep 2019, 4:17 PM – Senate Motions - Queensland - Bushfires

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Queensland Senator Larissa Waters (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes:

(i) that just one week after winter, Queensland is experiencing unprecedented and devastating bushfires and facing what the fire service has described as the most catastrophic bushfire season in recorded history,

(ii) that hundreds of people have been affected by the devastating fires—to date, 80 properties have been reported as damaged or destroyed, including the heritage-listed Bina Burra resort, and prior to these bushfires, a total of 40 properties had been lost to bushfire in Queensland in the previous 130 years,

(iii) the critical role that firefighting and emergency services personnel play in the frontline response to emergencies and climate-related disasters,

(iv) that the Bushfire and Natural Hazard Cooperative Research Centre's latest Seasonal Bushfire Outlook, August 2019, confirmed that Queensland fire seasons have been starting earlier and persisting longer since 1990,

(v) that drought conditions and severe water shortages in the Darling Downs and Granite Belt are expected to make fighting bushfires even more difficult across the summer, and

(vi) that, unless urgent action is taken to reduce harmful emissions and stop further global warming, bushfires, drought, and heatwaves will become more frequent and severe, putting Australian lives and properties at risk; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to:

(i) urgently take action to address climate change and manage the risk and severity of bushfires,

(ii) invest in community adaptation efforts to build resilience to climate change in moderate and high risk areas, and

(iii) commit to action to progress a rapid and just transition to clean and renewable energy sources to reduce the harmful emissions driving climate change.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

9th Sep 2019, 5:07 PM – Senate Motions - Energy - Clean energy industry

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Queensland Senator Larissa Waters (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) the Clean Energy Regulator's The Renewable Energy Target 2018 Administrative ReportThe acceleration in renewables investment, highlights the record investment in large scale, commercial and industrial and household renewables over the last year,

(ii) the Australian Bureau of Statistics reports that jobs in renewable energy in Queensland grew by 1,550 in 2017-2018, an increase of 44 percent on the previous year,

(iii) the Green Energy Markets 2019 update report, states that 2,012 full time equivalent Queenslanders were employed in the installation and sale of rooftop solar PV in June 2019,

(iv) the recently announced shortlist for the Queensland Government's Renewables 400 tender includes ten renewable energy generation and storage developments projected to collectively deliver 3,000 jobs in central and far north Queensland, including 350 direct jobs created by the Clarke Creek Wind and Solar Farm, west of Rockhampton, and

(v) the Adani Carmichael mine, if it proceeds, is expected to create between 800 and 1,500 jobs in the construction phase, with 100 ongoing jobs; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to:

(i) deliver real jobs that last, by backing the job-creating, climate-fixing clean energy industry, and

(ii) fund industry development, training and other support to ensure that regional workers and communities, including coal workers, have secure long-term futures.

absent Yes Not passed by a small majority

9th Sep 2019, 4:55 PM – Senate Motions - Fossil Fuel Basins - Halt development

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by WA Senator Rachel Siewert (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that, on 31 July 2019, offshore petroleum exploration acreage was released, containing 64 areas available for lease:

(i) this is largest number of areas released since 2000, with more than 120,000 square kilometres available, and

(ii) fossil fuels are the leading cause of climate change; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to halt the development of any further fossil fuel basins.

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

31st Jul 2019, 4:08 PM – Senate Motions - Banking and Financial Services - Transition to low carbon economy

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Queensland Senator Larissa Waters (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) the ability to secure finance and insurance is a crucial step in the development of large-scale resources projects, providing protection for developers, government and the community,

(ii) Suncorp last week announced that it would no longer invest in, finance or insure new thermal coal mines and power plants, and will not underwrite any existing thermal coal projects after 2025,

(iii) QBE Insurance announced in March that, from 1 July 2019, it would no longer directly invest in or insure new thermal coal projects and would stop underwriting existing operations from 2030,

(iv) all Australian-based insurance companies have now effectively committed to removing coal from their investment portfolios, and

(v) many major multi-national re-insurance providers, including Allianz, AXA, Swiss Re, Munich Re and Zurich, have also restricted investment in, and underwriting of, thermal coal projects; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to:

(i) pay attention to the financial signals and recognise that thermal coal projects are increasingly unviable, and

(ii) commit to action to progress a rapid and just transition to clean and renewable energy sources for a low-carbon economy.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

24th Jul 2019, 3:47 PM – Senate Motions - Great Barrier Reef - Protect from climate change

Show detail

The majority voted against a motion introduced by Queensland Senator Larissa Waters (Greens), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) on 17 July 2019, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority released a Position Statement on Climate Change, which stated: 'climate change is the greatest threat to the Great Barrier Reef. Only the strongest and fastest possible actions to decrease global greenhouse gas emissions will reduce the risks and limit the impacts of climate change on the Reef'... 'If we are to secure a future for the Great Barrier Reef and coral reef ecosystems globally, there is an urgent and critical need to accelerate actions to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions. This must happen in parallel to taking actions to build the Reef's resilience',

(ii) in an address to the British Parliament on 9 July 2019, Sir David Attenborough criticised Australia for not taking the risks of climate change seriously, and imperilling the Great Barrier Reef,

(iii) at its meeting in 2015, the UNESCO World Heritage Committee gave the Australian Government five years to address the state of the Great Barrier Reef before it re-considered whether to include it on the World Heritage In Danger list—the Australian Government is due to submit a report addressing the protection of the Reef's Outstanding Universal Value to avert an In Danger listing by 1 December 2019,

(iv) scientific reports confirm that approximately half of the shallow water coral of the Great Barrier Reef has been lost since 2016 due to successive coral bleaching incidents,

(v) the Association of Marine Park Tourism Operators has signed a Reef Climate Declaration that acknowledges climate change as "the single biggest threat to the Great Barrier Reef" and states that "Australia must join the rest of the world to rapidly phase out coal and other fossil fuels and transition to renewable energy",

(vi) the Great Barrier Reef supports approximately 64,000 jobs and generates $6 billion for the Australian economy annually,

(vii) the science and the economics are clear that these jobs are at risk if strong action is not taken immediately to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and limit global temperature rises to 1.5°C, and

(viii) fossil fuel companies have donated nearly $5 million to the Liberals, The Nationals and Labor parties over the past four years; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to:

(i) affirm the advice of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority that climate change is the greatest threat to the Great Barrier Reef,

(ii) direct Mr Warren Entsch, Special Envoy for the Great Barrier Reef, to prioritise actions that reduce greenhouse gas emissions,

(iii) implement a climate policy that accelerates actions to limit global warming to 1.5°C to protect the Great Barrier Reef,

(iv) take all action necessary to properly protect the Great Barrier Reef and avoid the UNESCO World Heritage Committee needing to place the Great Barrier Reef on the World Heritage In Danger list,

(v) revoke all federal approvals for the Adani Carmichael mine and not approve any new coal in Australia, and

(vi) develop a clear plan to move towards 100% clean energy, including a plan for a just transition for Australia's regional workforces affected by climate change so that regional economies can thrive and workers are protected, and ban corporate donations to political parties from the fossil fuel industry, an industry which financially benefits from this Government's lack of action on climate change.

absent Yes Not passed by a modest majority

4th Jul 2019 – Senate Motions - Energy - Affordable, clean, renewable energy

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The majority voted against an amendment to a motion introduced by West Australian Senator Louise Pratt (Labor), which means it failed. The amendment was introduced by Queensland Senator Larissa Waters (Greens).

Motion text

(1) After paragraph (a)(i), add:

(ia) Government is giving this gas away with no royalties and missing out on $90 billion in revenue with gas companies sitting on $324 billion in PRRT credits before they have to pay a cent in tax and that neither the government or opposition want to change this cosy set up or threaten future political donations,

(2) Omit subparagraph (a)(iii), substitute:

(iii) Australia has become the world's largest gas exporter, thanks to environmental approvals issued by Labor governments, while our own businesses face difficulties in securing affordable gas supplies;

(3) After subparagraph (a)(vi), insert:

(vii) gas exports increases pressure on domestic gas extraction, placing farmers' land and water under sustained threat from fracking for unconventional gas, and

(viii) new gas production will increase global emissions 25% more than new coal projects and the industry threatens our ability to stay below 1.5 degrees of warming,

(4) Omit paragraph (b), substitute:

(b) calls on the Government to take real action to reduce the cost of energy in Australia by:

(i) bringing big gas and fossil fuel companies to heel, supporting the transition to renewable energy and ensuring Australian users have access to affordable, clean, renewable energy;

(ii) guaranteeing a reduction in gas energy prices for Australian businesses by subsidising renewable energy developments to levels that can sustain competitive Australian manufacturing, as well as ensuring ample gas clean energy supply for Australian users; and

(iii) delivering a national energy policy that will end investment uncertainty and deliver a modern energy system including cheaper, reliable and clean power.

Original motion text

(a) notes that:

(i) since 2013, gas prices for manufacturers have skyrocketed, increasing by up to four times their levels in 2013,

(ii) according to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, spiralling gas prices have resulted in three manufacturers closing down and threaten the viability of many more businesses,

(iii) Australia has become the world’s largest gas exporter while our own businesses face difficulties in securing affordable gas supplies,

(iv) the Federal Government continues to refuse to bring big gas companies to heel by pulling the trigger on gas export controls,

(v) under Prime Minister Morrison, power prices have continued to skyrocket, with wholesale power price futures contracts up by 33% since former Prime Minister, Mr Malcolm Turnbull was forced out of The Lodge, and

(vi) Prime Minister Morrison’s election promise to reduce wholesale power prices to $70/mwh by 2021 would only bring prices back to the levels seen under his predecessor, Mr Turnbull; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to take real action to reduce the cost of energy in Australia by:

(i) bringing big gas companies to heel by finally pulling the trigger on gas export controls and ensuring Australian users have access to affordable Australian gas,

(ii) guaranteeing a reduction in gas prices for Australian businesses to levels that can sustain competitive Australian manufacturing, as well as ensuring ample gas supply for Australian users, and

(iii) delivering a national energy policy that will end investment uncertainty and deliver a modern energy system including cheaper, reliable and clean power.

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

26th Nov 2018, 3:51 PM – Senate Motions - Renewable Energy - Cheap, reliable and clean

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion introduced by Independent Senator Tim Storer, which means it succeeded. Motions like these don't make any legal changes on their own but since they represent the will of the Senate.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) Australia in blessed with world-class renewable energy and energy storage resources,

(ii) the price of renewable energy continues to decline, setting new records year on year,

(iii) utility-scale wind and solar farms are the cheapest form of new-build electricity generation in Australia today,

(iv) Australia has the highest penetration of rooftop solar in the world, with close to two million households having installed solar systems to help them to reduce their power bills, and

(v) South Australia's Honesdale Power Reserve, the world's biggest grid connected lithium-ion battery, is showing how new technology can put downward pressure on electricity prices and allow for the successful integration of high levels of wind and solar energy; and

(b) agrees that renewable energy, coupled with energy storage technologies, can provide "fair dinkum power" that is cheap, reliable and clean.

Yes Yes Passed by a small majority

27th Jun 2018, 4:20 PM – Senate Motions - Energy - More coal-fired power stations

Show detail

The majority voted against a motion introduced by Senator Pauline Hanson (Qld), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate calls on the government to facilitate the building of new coal-fired power stations and the retrofitting of existing base load power stations.

No No Not passed by a small majority

13th Sep 2017, 5:38 PM – Senate Motions - Energy - Transition for coal workforce required

Show detail

The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Richard Di Natale.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) considers coal-fired power stations in Australia will need to close in order to deal with climate change; and

(b) notes that the Government must have a plan for a managed transition of the workforce and to a clean energy future.

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

12th Sep 2017, 4:12 PM – Senate Motions - Renewable Energy - Against target and subsidies

Show detail

The majority voted against a motion introduced by Senator David Leyonhjelm, which means the motion failed.

Motion text

That the Senate agrees that—

(a) the renewable energy target should not continue beyond 2023;

(b) no scheme to subsidise renewable energy generation or mandate a particular market share for renewable energy generation should replace it; and

(c) renewable energy projects not already approved by the Clean Energy Regulator be ineligible to receive subsidies via renewable energy certificates.

No No Not passed by a large majority

11th Sep 2017 – Senate Motions - Energy - Liddell power station

Show detail

The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Richard Di Natale, which means the motion failed.

Motion text

That the Senate supports the closure of the Liddell power station in 2022, as currently planned, and calls on the Government to:

(a) abandon any attempts to extend the life of this aging coal-fired power station;

(b) address any issues of security of supply through means identified by the Australian Energy Market Operator, such as dispatchable renewables, storage and demand management; and

(c) develop a plan for the orderly retirement of coal-fired power stations in Australia.

absent Yes Not passed by a large majority

22nd Mar 2017, 5:05 PM – Senate Motions - Energy - Transition plan for coal workers

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion to introduce a transition plan for coal workers, which was introduced by Greens Party Leader Senator Richard Di Natale. These motions have no legal force, but represent the will of the Senate.

Motions

That the Senate—

(a) notes that the Government has had no choice but to walk away from funding coal-fired power stations as they now look to invest in storage technologies to support the unstoppable potential of clean energy;

(b) acknowledges that thermal coal is in structural decline and has no long-term future in Australia; and

(c) urges the Government to implement a just transition plan for the benefit of coal workers, before it is too late.

absent Yes Passed by a small majority

1st Dec 2016, 4:30 PM – Senate Motions - Coal Industry - For technology neutral policies

Show detail

The majority voted against a motion introduced by National Party Senator John Williams, which means it was unsuccessful.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) supports the 53 000 workers directly employed by the coal industry;

(b) recognises that the forced closure of coal–fired power stations would increase the living expenses of Australian families through increased electricity prices;

(c) acknowledges that the forced closure of coal–fired power stations would jeopardise Australia's energy security and put thousands of jobs at risk in our manufacturing sector which relies on access to cheap and affordable power;

(d) acknowledges that coal is an affordable, abundant and increasingly clean domestic energy resource that is vital to providing reliable low-cost electricity, and that it will continue to be integral to Australia; and

(e) supports technology neutral policies that deliver emission reduction targets.

absent No Not passed by a small majority

15th Sep 2016, 9:12 PM – Senate Budget Savings (Omnibus) Bill 2016 - Second Reading - ARENA funding

Show detail

The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Larissa Waters, which means it was unsuccessful.

Motion text

At the end of the motion, add:

, but the Senate condemns this bill for ripping $500 million from the Australian Renewable Energy Agency's clean energy innovation grants as a dangerous and irresponsible act of sabotage, especially in a climate emergency and global transition to clean energy, and because it leaves the Coalition and Labor parties with no meaningful plan to meet Australia's Renewable Energy Target and pollution reduction target agreed at the Paris climate conference.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

3rd May 2016, 4:02 PM – Senate Motions - Budget - Australian Renewable Energy Agency

Show detail

The majority voted against a motion that called for the Senate to resolve that funding for the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) won't be reduced. The motion was introduced by Greens Senator Larissa Waters.

Wording of the motion

That the Senate—

(a) notes:

(i) how well positioned Australia is to take advantage of the huge jobs and commercial opportunities from investing in research and development in clean energy technologies,

(ii) That the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) is the institution that will enable us to be global leaders in clean technology innovation, and

(iii) That the 2014 Budget proposed $1.3 billion in cuts to ARENA for the financial years 2017-18 to 2021-22 which have so far been blocked but which have caused considerable uncertainty for ARENA; and

(b) resolves That the $1.5 billion of currently legislated funding for ARENA for the financial years 2016-17 to 2021-22 will not be reduced.

absent Yes Not passed by a modest majority

19th Apr 2016, 7:39 PM – Senate Motions - Climate Change - End fossil fuel political donations

Show detail

The majority voted against a motion, which was introduced by Greens Senator Larissa Waters. The motion called on all political parties to ban and refuse to accept fossil fuel donations.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes:

(i) the unprecedented coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef which the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority describes as the worst ever mass bleaching event,

(ii) the devastating bushfires affecting areas of Tasmania's Wilderness World Heritage Area which have not been burned in centuries and which may never recover,

(iii) the fact that 2014 and 2015 were both the hottest year on record, and that the United Kingdom Meteorological Office predicts that 2016 will also be the hottest year on record,

(iv) that ordinary Australians are leading the way in calling for action on global warming, in particular, the students at the University of Queensland who have occupied the Chancellery Building calling on the University to divest from fossil fuels, and

(v) that fossil fuel companies have made $3.7 million in political donations to the Coalition and the Australian Labor Party since the 2013 election; and

(b) calls on all political parties to:

(i) support a legislative ban on fossil fuel donations, and

(ii) refuse to accept any more fossil fuel donations.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

17th Mar 2016, 12:39 PM – Senate Motions - Climate Change - Support a rapid transition to clean energy

Show detail

The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Larissa Waters. It called for the government to stop supporting new coal mining developments and start supporting a rapid transition to clean energy.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) the Chief Scientist, Dr Alan Finkel, stated on the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's Q&A program that Australia is 'losing the battle' against global warming,

(ii) Professor Terry Hughes has told 'The Conversation' that Australia can either develop new coal mines or protect the Great Barrier Reef, but 'we can't possibly do both',

(iii) coral bleaching caused by global warming has already caused the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority to raise its bleaching alert to Level 2, and the United States' National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has upgraded its Coral Reef Watch warning for the far northern Great Barrier Reef to Alert Level 2, the highest threat level, and

(iv) the mining and burning of coal is driving dangerous global warming which threatens the Great Barrier Reef; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to abandon its support for the Adani mega coal mine and Abbot Point coal port expansion, and support a rapid transition to 100 per cent clean energy as soon as possible, and at least 90 per cent clean energy by 2030.

absent Yes (strong) Not passed by a modest majority

20th Aug 2015, 12:18 PM – Senate Motions - Galilee Basin - Stop legal actions by anti-coal activists

Show detail

An equal number of Senators voted for and against the motion, which means it was unsuccessful. The motion concerned mining operations in the Galilee Basin and Abbot Point and called on the Government to "remov[e] legal loopholes that allow for the hijacking of approval processes for political purposes".

Motion text

That the Senate notes:

(a) the importance of the Galilee Basin and Abbot Point to the future development of northern Australia;

(b) the ongoing support of the Queensland and the Australian governments for the responsible and sustainable development of the Galilee Basin and Abbot Point;

(c) the actions of anti coal activists which have delayed billions of dollars in investment and thousands of much needed jobs; and

(d) the importance of maintaining the reputation of Queensland and Australia as a mining and resource hub by removing legal loopholes that allow for the hijacking of approval processes for political purposes.

No No (strong) Not passed

23rd Jun 2015, 11:03 PM – Senate Renewable Energy (Electricity) Amendment Bill 2015 - Third Reading - Pass the bill

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion to pass the bill (in parliamentary jargon, they voted to read the bill for a third time).

Purpose of the bill

The bill amends the Commonwealth Renewable Energy Target (RET) scheme by, for example, reducing the large-scale renewable energy target (LRET) and replacing the requirement for two-yearly reviews of the operation of the RET scheme with annual statements by the Clean Energy Regulator (CER). Further detail is available in the bills digest.

Read more on ABC News.

Yes No (strong) Passed by a modest majority

17th Jun 2015, 6:02 PM – Senate Renewable Energy (Electricity) Amendment Bill 2015 - Second Reading - Agree to the bill's main idea

Show detail

The majority voted in favour of a motion to agree with the bill's main idea (in parliamentary jargon, they voted to read the bill for a second time).

Main idea of the bill

The bill amends the Commonwealth Renewable Energy Target (RET) scheme by, for example, reducing the large-scale renewable energy target (LRET) and replacing the requirement for two-yearly reviews of the operation of the RET scheme with annual statements by the Clean Energy Regulator (CER). Further detail is available in the bills digest.

absent No (strong) Passed by a modest majority

15th Mar 2012, 12:12 PM – Senate Motions - Coal - From coal to clean energy market

Show detail

The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Christine Milne, which means the motion was unsuccessful.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) China's twelfth 5 year plan is expected to introduce caps on coal use from 2015,

(ii) the price of coking coal has already dropped some 40 per cent in the past year, due in large part to a drop in China's demand for imported coal,

(iii) China expects utility scale solar power to out-compete new coal-fired power stations by the end of the decade, while the Indian Government expects the cost crossover as soon as 2016,

(iv) India's economic giant, Tata Power, has publicly stated that its new investments will favour renewable energy, as coal power is becoming 'impossible' to develop,

(v) the Australian Bureau of Resource and Energy Economics (BREE) continues to predict that coal exports will double over the next two decades, and

(vi) Australia is leaving itself economically exposed by focusing on the development of coal export infrastructure; and

(b) calls on the Government to:

(i) require BREE to review its modelling based on the current geopolitics of coal, and

(ii) rethink Australia's economic settings, which assume ongoing increases in the coal export market, and instead look to broaden Australia's economic base and build a more competitive clean energy economy.

absent Yes Not passed by a modest majority

18th Nov 2010, 10:21 AM – Senate Motions - Climate Change - Benefits of fast transition to zero or low emissions

Show detail

The majority voted against a motion calling for the Government to consider the benefits of a fast transition for the economy to zero or low emissions, which means the motion failed.

Motion text

That the Senate:

(a) notes that a statement from a group of the world’s largest investors, representing US$15 trillion:

(i) calls for domestic and international policies to ‘unlock the vast benefits of low-carbon markets and avoid economic devastation caused by climate change’,

(ii) cites potentially 20 per cent losses to gross domestic product by 2050 if climate change goes unabated,

(iii) notes the benefits of both a carbon price and regulation in driving investment into renewable energy and other clean technologies, and

(iv) calls for emissions targets, strong and sustained price signals, energy and transportation policies, the phase out of fossil fuel subsidies, adaptation measures and corporate disclosure of climate risk to be implemented;

(b) applauds the moves by elements of Australian business to embrace the opportunities provided by ambitious climate action; and

(c) calls on the Government to consider the increasing benefits of swiftly transforming the economy for low to zero emissions.

absent Yes Not passed by a large majority

8th Feb 2007, 10:57 AM – Senate Motions - Climate Change - Reduce coal exports

Show detail

The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Kerry Nettle, which means it was unsuccessful.

Motion text

That the Senate:

(a) notes the statements by Clean-Up Australia Day founder, Mr Ian Kiernan, regarding the ‘absolutely frightening’ contribution of Australia’s coal exports to greenhouse gas emissions and climate change; and

(b) calls on the Government to work with state governments to reduce coal exports and provide a just transition for workers in the coal industry.

absent Yes Not passed by a large majority

27th Nov 2006, 4:10 PM – Senate Motions - Newcastle City Council - Renewables and public transport

Show detail

The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Bob Brown, which means it was rejected.

Motion text

That the Senate supports the following resolution of Newcastle City Council:

Newcastle City Council recognises the urgent need to protect local and global environments from increasing greenhouse gas emissions and to reduce Newcastle’s role in that increase.

Therefore Newcastle City Council:

1. Recommends that the NSW Government establishes a cap on coal exports from Newcastle at existing levels.

2. Recommends that the NSW Government initiates an independent Inquiry into the environmental, social and economic sustainability of the current coal industry and proposed expansion of the Hunter Valley coal industry.

3. Recommends that pending such an Inquiry, the NSW Government initiates a moratorium on new coal mine approvals at Anvil Hill and elsewhere in NSW.

4. Calls on the NSW and Federal Governments to establish a mandatory renewable energy target of 25% by 2020, with 20% by 2014 as a first step, in keeping with targets set by the South Australian Government.

5. Calls on the NSW Government to establish a contribution of 10c/tonne on coal exports through the Port of Newcastle to fund a community trust to be administered through Hunter Councils, to support a transition to a clean energy economy in the Hunter and to invest in local renewable energy projects.

6. Calls on the NSW Government to build a more efficient public transport system in the Hunter, linking major regional cities defined in the Lower Hunter Regional Strategy.

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

How "voted a mixture of for and against" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 1 50 50
MP voted against policy 1 0 50
MP absent 2 50 100
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 3 30 30
MP voted against policy 9 0 90
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 9 9 18
Total: 139 338

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 139 / 338 = 41%.

And then