How Tim Storer voted compared to someone who believes that the federal government should address the causes and consequences of climate change as a matter of urgency by, for example, lowering emissions and investing in science and technology

Division Tim Storer Supporters vote Division outcome

4th Dec 2018, 6:19 PM – Senate Matters of Urgency - Climate Change - Coal exports

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Larissa Waters (Queensland, Australian Greens) moved a motion:

That, in the opinion of the Senate, the following is a matter of urgency:

Australia's coal exports are one of the most significant contributors to climate change globally.

This was one of ten proposed motions received by the senate before 8:30 am and was selected by lot in accordance of standing order 75.

Yes Yes Not passed by a modest majority

28th Nov 2018, 3:55 PM – Senate Motions - Coalmines in the Galilee Basin - Refuse

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Larissa Waters (Qld), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes:

(i) that MacMines Austasia 20,000-hectare China Stone thermal coal project in the Galilee Basin is one step closer to approval,

(ii) that this mine is expected to export 38 million tonnes of coal annually,

(iii) that this single Galilee Basin project is estimated to produce 128.4 metric tonnes of CO2 per year, which is equivalent to 23% of Australia's total domestic emissions in 2017, or about ten years' worth of Australia's domestic emissions over the lifetime of the mine,

(iv) that, this week, large parts of north and far north Queensland are in a severe heatwave with indication that the heatwave will spread west to the Northern Territory border,

(v) that temperature records for many Queensland towns have been broken,

(vi) that about 1500 people have been displaced, up to 600 evacuated and at least four houses lost, as unprecedented bushfires continue to burn in the Deepwater National Park region, south of Gladstone,

(vii) the emotional trauma and financial hardship that these sorts of extreme weather events can inflict on our communities,

(viii) that the work of emergency services and volunteers is to be commended,

(ix) that the Galilee Basin has 9 mega coal mines proposed, including the Adani Carmichael mine, China Stone mine, Alpha Coal Project, Kevin's Corner Project, Degulla Coal, Alpha West, Alpha North, Galilee (China First) Coal Project and South Galilee Coal Mine,

(x) that there is undeniable evidence that CO2 emissions are driving dangerous global warming which is causing extreme weather conditions unlike any we have ever seen before, and

(xi) that unless we take urgent action to stop global warming, bushfires, flooding, drought, heat waves will become more frequent and increasingly severe; and

(b) calls on the Minister for the Environment to:

(i) urgently take proactive measures against global warming,

(ii) refuse federal environmental approval for MacMines' China Stone thermal coal mine, and

(iii) not approve any coal mines in the Galilee Basin.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

27th Nov 2018, 5:11 PM – Senate Motions - School Strike 4 Climate Action - National climate and energy policy

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The majority voted in favour of a motion introduced by Greens Senator Jordon Steele-John (WA) also on behalf of Greens Senator Mehreen Faruqi (NSW). Motions like these don't make any legal changes on their own but can be politically influential as they represent the will of the Senate.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that:

(i) this Friday, 30 November 2018, students from the movement 'School Strike 4 Climate Action' will hold a national school strike, and

(ii) young people will live with the effects of climate change for the longest time and that, therefore, their voices and their concerns must be heard in the debate;

(b) commends all students across Australia for their commitment to action on climate change; and

(c) calls on the Federal Government to put in place a national climate and energy policy.

Yes Yes Passed by a small majority

26th Nov 2018, 3:47 PM – Senate Motions - Climate Change - Develop and implement a serious policy

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The majority voted in favour of a motion introduced by Greens Senator Sarah Hanson-Young (SA), which means it succeeded. Motions like these don't make any legal changes on their own but can be politically influential since they represent the will of the Senate.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes the Flinders University research published in Nature's Scientific Reports, which shows that 'climate change and human activity are dooming species at an unprecedented rate via a plethora of direct and indirect, often synergic, mechanisms';

(b) notes that climate change is, without a doubt, the biggest threat to life on our planet; and

(c) calls on the Federal Government to develop and implement a serious climate and energy policy, with a plan to reduce carbon pollution and overhaul our environmental laws to protect life on earth.

Yes Yes Passed by a small majority

12th Nov 2018, 4:26 PM – Senate Motions - Minister for the Environment - Apologise to Kiribati President

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The majority voted in favour of a motion introduced by Greens Senator Sarah Hanson-Young (SA), which means it passed. Motions like these don't make any legal changes on their own, but can be politically influential since they represent the will of the Senate.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes that the Minister for the Environment, Ms Price, made offensive remarks to former President of Kiribati, Anote Tong;

(b) further notes that former President Tong has a long history of advocating on behalf of his people, his country and the Pacific, who will be first and worst affected by climate change; and

(c) calls on the Federal Government to apologise to former President Tong, commend him for his heroic actions on behalf of his people, and take seriously the threat of climate change in the Pacific region.

absent Yes Passed by a small majority

16th Oct 2018, 4:30 PM – Senate Motions - Climate Change - Donations, climate policy and Adani

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The majority voted against a motion introduced by Greens Senator Larissa Waters (Qld), which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate—

(a) notes:

(i) that the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) forecasts that warming of 2 degrees above pre-industrial levels will see the death of 100 per cent of coral reefs globally, and that warming of 1.5°C will see 90 per cent of coral reefs die,

(ii) that the IPCC forecasts that warming is likely to reach 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels between 2030 and 2052 if it continues at the current trajectory,

(iii) the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) report, released on 18 September 2018, Impacts of Climate Change on World Heritage Coral Reefs: Update to the First Global Scientific Assessment, which confirms that remaining within 1.5°C climate target is critical for survival of World Heritage-listed coral reefs,

(iv) the statement by the Chair of the Great Barrier Reef Foundation Board during the Brisbane hearing of the inquiry into the Great Barrier Reef 2050 Partnership Program, that "many reefs around the world are classified as in danger, regardless of whether UNESCO has them listed", and

(v) that 64 000 people rely on jobs supported by the Great Barrier Reef; and

(b) calls on the Federal Government to:

(i) ban corporate donations to political parties from the fossil fuel industry, an industry which financially benefits from this Government's lack of action on climate change,

(ii) get a climate policy that limits global warming to 1 degrees to protect the Great Barrier Reef and Australians from extreme weather events, and

(iii) revoke all federal approvals for the Adani Carmichael mine, and not approve any new coal in Australia.

No Yes Not passed by a large majority

15th Aug 2018, 5:21 PM – Senate Regulations and Determinations - Product Emissions Standards (Excise) Charges Regulations 2018, Product Emissions Standards (Customs) Charges Regulations 2018 - Disallow

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The majority voted against a motion to disallow two regulations, which means it failed. These regulations address the negative impacts of air pollution from certain products on human and environmental health.

This motion was moved by South Australian Senator Cory Bernardi, who explained that:

In essence, they [the regulations] are the carbon tax on whipper-snippers, lawnmowers and outboard engines that were identified at the very passage of this bill and yet they were blithely championed through and sponsored through in the absence of a great deal of information and supported by people who said they had nothing whatsoever to do with the climate agreement reached in Paris. They were wrong.

Motion text

That the Product Emissions Standards (Excise) Charges Regulations 2018, made under the Product Emissions Standards (Excise) Charges Act 2017, and the Product Emissions Standards (Customs) Charges Regulations 2018, made under the Product Emissions Standards (Customs) Charges Act 2017, be disallowed.

No No Not passed by a large majority

14th Aug 2018, 3:59 PM – Senate Motions - Paris Agreement - Withdraw

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The majority voted against a motion to withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement, which means it failed.

Motion text

That the Senate:

(a) notes that the United States of America has withdrawn from the Paris Climate Agreement; and

(b) calls upon the Australian Government to also withdraw from the Agreement, and cease taking any steps towards enacting at law or by policy any steps towards the Agreement's targets.

No No Not passed by a large majority

How "voted moderately for" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 5 50 50
MP voted against policy 2 0 20
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 1 1 2
Total: 51 72

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 51 / 72 = 71%.

And then