How David Smith voted compared to someone who believes that there should be more scrutiny or oversight of the actions and powers of the Australian Defence Force (ADF), both within Australia and overseas

Division David Smith Supporters vote Division outcome

27th Nov 2018, 12:16 PM – Senate Defence Amendment (Call Out of the Australian Defence Force) Bill 2018 - Second Reading - Agree with bill's main idea

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The majority voted in favour of a motion to agree with the main idea of the bill. In parliamentary jargon, they voted to read the bill for a second time. This means that the bill can now be discussed in more detail.

What does the bill do?

The bill was introduced to clarify how the Australian Defence Force (ADF) can be called out to protect Commonwealth interests and states and self-governing territories from domestic violence. It was introduced following a Defence review after the Lindt café siege in Sydney.

It makes the following changes to:

  • permit states and territories to request that the Commonwealth call out the Australian Defence Force (ADF) in a wider range of circumstances;
  • enable call out orders to authorise the ADF to operate in multiple jurisdictions, as well as the offshore area;
  • authorise the ADF to respond to incidents that cross a border into a jurisdiction that has not been specified in an order in certain circumstances;
  • allow the ADF to be pre-authorised to respond to land and maritime threats, in addition to aviation threats;
  • increase the requirements for the ADF to consult with state and territory police where it is operating in their jurisdictions;
  • simplify, expand and clarify the power of the ADF to search and seize, and to control movement during an incident;
  • remove the distinction between general security areas and designated areas; and
  • for the purposes of expedited call out, clarify that acting ministers are to be treated as substantive ministers and add the Minister for Home Affairs as an alternative authorising minister.

Read more in the bills digest.

Yes No Passed by a modest majority

27th Nov 2018, 12:13 PM – Senate Defence Amendment (Call Out of the Australian Defence Force) Bill 2018 - Second Reading - Make disallowable instruments

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The majority voted against a second reading amendment moved by Tasmanian Senator Nick McKim (Greens). The amendment would have added the words below to the usual second reading motion, which was that they agree with the main idea of the bill. Or, in parliamentary jargon, that they "read the bill for a second time".

Motion text

At the end of the motion, add "but the Senate is of the opinion that:

(a) call out orders should be disallowable instruments so that they are subject to scrutiny by the Parliament; and

(b) the Parliament should sit within six days of any call out order being made".

What does the bill do?

The bill was introduced to clarify how the Australian Defence Force (ADF) can be called out to protect Commonwealth interests and states and self-governing territories from domestic violence. It was introduced following a Defence review after the Lindt café siege in Sydney.

It makes the following changes to:

  • permit states and territories to request that the Commonwealth call out the Australian Defence Force (ADF) in a wider range of circumstances;
  • enable call out orders to authorise the ADF to operate in multiple jurisdictions, as well as the offshore area;
  • authorise the ADF to respond to incidents that cross a border into a jurisdiction that has not been specified in an order in certain circumstances;
  • allow the ADF to be pre-authorised to respond to land and maritime threats, in addition to aviation threats;
  • increase the requirements for the ADF to consult with state and territory police where it is operating in their jurisdictions;
  • simplify, expand and clarify the power of the ADF to search and seize, and to control movement during an incident;
  • remove the distinction between general security areas and designated areas; and
  • for the purposes of expedited call out, clarify that acting ministers are to be treated as substantive ministers and add the Minister for Home Affairs as an alternative authorising minister.

Read more in the bills digest.

No Yes Not passed by a modest majority

How "voted very strongly against" is worked out

The MP's votes count towards a weighted average where the most important votes get 50 points, less important votes get 10 points, and less important votes for which the MP was absent get 2 points. In important votes the MP gets awarded the full 50 points for voting the same as the policy, 0 points for voting against the policy, and 25 points for not voting. In less important votes, the MP gets 10 points for voting with the policy, 0 points for voting against, and 1 (out of 2) if absent.

Then, the number gets converted to a simple english language phrase based on the range of values it's within.

No of votes Points Out of
Most important votes (50 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 0 0 0
MP absent 0 0 0
Less important votes (10 points)      
MP voted with policy 0 0 0
MP voted against policy 2 0 20
Less important absentees (2 points)      
MP absent* 0 0 0
Total: 0 20

*Pressure of other work means MPs or Senators are not always available to vote – it does not always indicate they have abstained. Therefore, being absent on a less important vote makes a disproportionatly small difference.

Agreement score = MP's points / total points = 0 / 20 = 0.0%.

And then